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Swingarm Bolt

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I'm trying to remove my swingarm from a 1998 KX 250 frame, but I can't get the swingarm bolt out. I got the nut off of the end of the swingarm bolt without any problems, but I can't force the swingarm bolt to budge one little bit. Does the bolt thread throughout the whole swingarm or are the threads just where the nut attached? I've taken a hammer and tapped on it hoping to break it loose so it would slide out, but no luck. So how does that bolt come out?

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Hit it harder. They don't thread into the frame. If the bearings are really worn, they might have put a groove in the bolt. Make sure all the weight is off the swingarm, then use a socket extension and tap it harder, it should start to move. Be careful not to damage the threads. Probably just a bunch of white corrosion buildup you need to get through. When you put it back together, grease up the bolt.

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I'm trying to remove my swingarm from a 1998 KX 250 frame, but I can't get the swingarm bolt out. I got the nut off of the end of the swingarm bolt without any problems, but I can't force the swingarm bolt to budge one little bit. Does the bolt thread throughout the whole swingarm or are the threads just where the nut attached? I've taken a hammer and tapped on it hoping to break it loose so it would slide out, but no luck. So how does that bolt come out?

KX swingarm and rear suspension linkages are prone to siezing up soild from water seeping into the needle bearings. Very few people ever completely dissasemble the linkages and keep them properly greased. I am willing to bet yours has never been apart, and is now siezed. Lay the bike on it's side (with the swingarm nut end facing up). Spray PB Blaster oil around the bolt at both ends to allow the oil too seep into the swingarm needle bearings and bushings. Get ready for a battle with a hammer. Also be ready to sink some big $$$$$ into swingarm and linkage bearing kits. Pivot Works makes reasonably priced kits. When you reassemble everything, mix 50% grease, and 50% antiseize compound, and it will last years.

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do what has already been mentioned, but consider a hardwood dowel to use as a driving pin, the wood creates a dampening impact instead of metal on metal that could crack something. Even on a new bike they can be stubborn like mine, I took mine apart and there was practically no grease from factory.

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Use penetrating oil, then use a brass drift / punch. Sears used to carry a Mayhew set that had a drift that was a good size for the swingarm bolt. It is better to not directly pound on the bolt and mushroom the threaded end outward. If it gets real bad, then heat will be required also (propane torch, etc.).

I would suggest that you just use grease inside the new bearings and anti-seize on the outside when installing new ones.

I would also suggest that you clean and regrease them once or twice a year. After you get it all repaired, you will be motivated to clean and grease them in the future.

Good luck with it.

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Just wait until you ride your bike with a properly greased free working rear suspension!! (It's like adding a soft pillow under your a$$ when you ride)

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Whoever had this bike really did a big number in screwing up the little things. I'll have to replace the back wheel hub because the bearings were never changed and seized up. This in turn caused the new bearings to fit loosely in the hub. The front master cylinder wouldn't hold pressure and I had to order a new one (170 bucks). Pistons on the front calliper were warped and wouldn't push out properly (70 bucks for a used calliper). The front wheel bearings were shot and had to be changed. The studs on the front forks were broken off and replaced with cheap bolts that broke. No way to fix so I had to get some used front forks (200 bucks). I've had the bike for almost two months and only ridden it for maybe two hours total before I got so fed up with the problems, that I just started disassembling the whole bike. I'm going to do a total rebuild from the ground up. At this rate I could have afforded an 07 model and still had some cash in my pocket. As soon as I get the swingarm bolt out, I'm going to have the frame either repainted or powder coated. I should be an expert on building this bike by the time I'll finally get to ride it. Anyway, back to the garage to try and get that swingarm bolt out.

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Whoever had this bike really did a big number in screwing up the little things. I'll have to replace the back wheel hub because the bearings were never changed and seized up. This in turn caused the new bearings to fit loosely in the hub. The front master cylinder wouldn't hold pressure and I had to order a new one (170 bucks). Pistons on the front calliper were warped and wouldn't push out properly (70 bucks for a used calliper). The front wheel bearings were shot and had to be changed. The studs on the front forks were broken off and replaced with cheap bolts that broke. No way to fix so I had to get some used front forks (200 bucks). I've had the bike for almost two months and only ridden it for maybe two hours total before I got so fed up with the problems, that I just started disassembling the whole bike. I'm going to do a total rebuild from the ground up. At this rate I could have afforded an 07 model and still had some cash in my pocket. As soon as I get the swingarm bolt out, I'm going to have the frame either repainted or powder coated. I should be an expert on building this bike by the time I'll finally get to ride it. Anyway, back to the garage to try and get that swingarm bolt out.

I am sorry to hear of your "money pit" new bike. You are describing an all too familiar tale of the guy who steals a dirt bike for "cheap money", then has to dump about a grand into ressurecting the bike into ridable, reliable condition. I work for a dealer, and I see this scenario dozens of times. Think of it as a restoration, and you are gaining good working knowledge of your KX, thats all you can do at this point.

One suggestion, tear down the top end for an inspection. If the previous owner(s) was that much of a $hithead as far as lack of maintenence, its a good idea to get an idea of the internal engine condition now, rather than blow the crank because the previous owner(s) never cleaned the air filter.

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The broken studs on the forks can be fixed.

Good luck on the rebuild. Thanks for helping out that poor bike.

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After three nights of pounding away with a hammer and a whole canister of PB Blaster, I finally forced the swingarm bolt out. It also took heating up the bolt with a cutting torch, before I could get the bolt to budge. Like everybody guessed, every bearing in the whole suspension and swingarm assembly was seized up. Anyway, has anybody had their frame, subframe, and/or swingarm repainted or powder coated? I'm undecided as to whether or not I want to paint or powder coat the frame. I think glossy coat of black paint would set the frame off, but I'm concerned that it would get scratched up during reassembly no matter how careful I am. I also think that having the frame powder coated with a smoother feeling rhino-liner type of coating would be more durable and practical. If anybody has done this or has pix of it, post em up.

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