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Using the power of a 450

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Okay, so people are always making statements like, "most people can't use the full power that a 450 has to offer"

What (in your opinion) is "using the full power" exactly? How does one know whether he/she is using the full power of a bike? Is it as simple as someone that has the bike pinned in every gear?

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I'll give you an example of "not using the full power". I recently rode with my smaller brother who rides a 250 (I'm on a 450). We hadn't ridden together in literally 23 years. Anyway, we went on some sloppy, tight, hilly single tracks that wouldn't allow you to get out of 3rd gear. He's a good rider and is faster and in better shape than me and he pulled away from me. On this kind of riding, the 450 was a disadvantage to his 250 because it was slow and technical riding so I was riding a heavier bike without being able to take advantage of the power.

Also, my brother used to ride a 450 like all of his friends. He swears that he goes faster on the 250 and has more energy left at the end of the day. When he's racing his buddies on a track, he says he beats most of them on the corners but they pull him on the straights.

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I certainly use all the power my CRF450 pumps out - albeit I spend most of my time runnin in the desert - use it all, could certainly use a 6th gear though!!

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As far as MX goes, look at a racer like RC. He never shuts off, and always has the throttle on and pulling. He uses all the power his 450 can give.

If you ever find yourself coasting, blipping the throttle, or leaving the bike in one gear on long straights instead of upshifting, you aren't using all the power you've got. And lets face it, there anren't many tracks where you can get the bike pinned in 5th. Most riders aren't honest enough with themselves to admit that they can't use all the stock engine has to offer.

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I think overall a 450 is more tiring because the power is more like a light switch - it's either on or off. A 250 is a more managable power. Dirt bikes like to be in the higher rpms and I often find myself lugging it up a hill in whatever gear I'm in just because it can. Would be faster winding it out at a higher rpm and lower gear.

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So by your guys logic...since your not hitting the top of 5th gear...your not using all the power?

Of course that is dead wrong. You are only not using all of the speed. You use all of the power everytime you rev out through a gear. The more power...the faster you accelerate through that gear.

If you can't get it too hook up...you might have too much power. But if that is not the case....your using it all...and could probably use more.

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Okay, so people are always making statements like, "most people can't use the full power that a 450 has to offer"

What (in your opinion) is "using the full power" exactly? How does one know whether he/she is using the full power of a bike? Is it as simple as someone that has the bike pinned in every gear?

I think most people say that because they don't always use all the power a 450 has to offer. An example would be that I can rip through woops like a bat out of hell, I don't roll on the throttle, I gun it. But I am also not that skilled on my turning, so I have to roll the throttle and play it safe.

So does my 450 have more power than I need? Some times Yes and sometimes No.

A good example of someone who always uses the power of a 450 is RC or Bubba, anyone else just uses it sometimes.

If you are thinking about getting one, and you are comming off a 250 two smoke thinking you need more, then get the 450.

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please allow me to tell you a simple way to test if your using a 450 to its full.

set up a course, get on a track anything you may want. so lon as its the same

get someone to use a stop watch for oyu.

now get on somehting like a 230, and run that course. best as oyu can. then do it on the 450.

now do it with a 250 to 450.

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please allow me to tell you a simple way to test if your using a 450 to its full.

set up a course, get on a track anything you may want. so lon as its the same

get someone to use a stop watch for oyu.

now get on somehting like a 230, and run that course. best as oyu can. then do it on the 450.

now do it with a 250 to 450.

Agreed...like I said, my brother is faster on a track with his 250 than he was on his 450.

Also agree with the light switch analogy...that's why I'm putting a 13 oz flywheel on.

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I thought RC's comments regarding bike performance after one of the first few races of the 2006 MX season was very interesting. He stated that he and his team had finally dialed in his bike better than ever, (perhaps he would consider it perfect), and that his bike was no longer holding him back. Said a different way, this means that he is the weak link in the performance chain. RC cannot use all that his bike has to offer.

Now, granted he has every performance part anyone could possibly want, but think about it: RC's bike is not holding him back. Improving his riding skills is the only thing that could do to increase his speed at this point...according to the man himself!

So, tricking out a bike with performance enhancing parts is going to help you a little bit here and a little bit there, but your skills are your weakest link, (I don't care who you are!). Put RC on a completely stock 450 and you on the trickest bike available, and he'll kick your ass every time. On a two minute long track, I bet he laps you within 5 laps.

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I don't remember what MX race it was, but a couple of the pro Lites riders raced their 250Fs against the local boys on their 450Fs and both of the Lites riders won on smaller bikes. Just another example of how it's more important to work on your riding skills than it is to dump your cash into expensive aftermarket parts.

If you want to just feel the raw power of a tricked out bike, then go ahead and spend your money, but don't lie and say you really need it.

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I thought RC's comments regarding bike performance after one of the first few races of the 2006 MX season was very interesting. He stated that he and his team had finally dialed in his bike better than ever, (perhaps he would consider it perfect), and that his bike was no longer holding him back. Said a different way, this means that he is the weak link in the performance chain. RC cannot use all that his bike has to offer.

Now, granted he has every performance part anyone could possibly want, but think about it: RC's bike is not holding him back. Improving his riding skills is the only thing that could do to increase his speed at this point...according to the man himself!

So, tricking out a bike with performance enhancing parts is going to help you a little bit here and a little bit there, but your skills are your weakest link, (I don't care who you are!). Put RC on a completely stock 450 and you on the trickest bike available, and he'll kick your ass every time. On a two minute long track, I bet he laps you within 5 laps.

In the late 70's, there was a trail ride/race that my dad and I rode. I was only 8 so we obviously approached it as a trail ride. Anyway, Brad Lackey (one of the best riders ever) showed up and rode it on a Honda xr75...and came in 3rd.

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There are certain places on the tracks I ride that I definately use ALL the power the bike will give me.

Horsepower Hill at Cycle Ranch is a Very large step with with an uphill approach. My last bike could only make it if my run up with perfect with no mistakes. My new bike will make it with limited mistakes out of right hand conrner proceeding. The track is sandy/clay and is deep in the corner before the run up the hill. I give it all shes got and can clear it, but if I hold back, it wont make it.

So yes, in certain situations I believe 100% is needed and used.

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So there's one or two spots on a track where you have to pin it. That's a long way from being able to wring it out to the max everywhere on a track, and that's what we're talking about. I can see a rider doing mods to move power around to suit their style, but 99% of us don't NEED more.

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Chew on this for a while.

I think all the talk on here about people not being able to use all the power that they have is crap. If at any point while riding you have the throttle pinned trying to go as fast as you can, you are using all the power that the bike has.

There isn't a single person alive that can use all the power that a bike has at every second that they're on the bike. At some point you have to let off the throttle, and at that time you will not be using all the power that the bike has to offer.

I've seen Ricky and Bubba idleing around on their 450's (not using all the power that the bike has) does this mean they should have smaller bikes?

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Chew on this for a while.

I think all the talk on here about people not being able to use all the power that they have is crap. If at any point while riding you have the throttle pinned trying to go as fast as you can, you are using all the power that the bike has.

There isn't a single person alive that can use all the power that a bike has at every second that they're on the bike. At some point you have to let off the throttle, and at that time you will not be using all the power that the bike has to offer.

I've seen Ricky and Bubba idleing around on their 450's (not using all the power that the bike has) does this mean they should have smaller bikes?

Agreed, I think all this is a moot point unless you race. If you race, then the only thing that matters is your lap times and what class you're in. For recreational riders, I think it's just your preference. I wish I had a little more power everytime I ride Glamis or open desert.

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Chew on this for a while.

I think all the talk on here about people not being able to use all the power that they have is crap. If at any point while riding you have the throttle pinned trying to go as fast as you can, you are using all the power that the bike has.

There isn't a single person alive that can use all the power that a bike has at every second that they're on the bike. At some point you have to let off the throttle, and at that time you will not be using all the power that the bike has to offer.

I've seen Ricky and Bubba idleing around on their 450's (not using all the power that the bike has) does this mean they should have smaller bikes?

Okay, I'm done chewing...

Very simply put, for 99% of us, it depends on the terrain. Wide open desert, I wish I was on a KTM520. Very tight, woods riding, I would prefer a 250. I love my 450 as the best all around bike. I will never own a 250 because of those certain times where I need every pony the 450 has (like a long, loose hill climb) but I do realize that there ARE times that you CAN'T use all of the 450's power so a lighter bike would be preferred.

And I'm not just talking about wringing it out in 5th. :thumbsup:

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I also agree it depends on the situation and where you want to be fast. I would rather be fast when it gets tight and technical and it is actually the rider, not when it's wide open and all i have to do is twist the wrist and blow by someone.... that is for rednecks if you ask me. I bet 99.9 percent of us would be faster on a smaller bike in almost every situation. The more I ride, the smaller the bike I like. There are those that admit the truth and those that have their heads stuck in the sand.. you can figure out who's who. Besides, it's way more fun humilating some tough guy on his 450 on a 125 than the other way around.

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I also agree it depends on the situation and where you want to be fast. I would rather be fast when it gets tight and technical and it is actually the rider, not when it's wide open and all i have to do is twist the wrist and blow by someone.... that is for rednecks if you ask me. I bet 99.9 percent of us would be faster on a smaller bike in almost every situation. The more I ride, the smaller the bike I like. There are those that admit the truth and those that have their heads stuck in the sand.. you can figure out who's who. Besides, it's way more fun humilating some tough guy on his 450 on a 125 than the other way around.

I am going to say yours does not have a license plate and you never ride it on the street. If you ever get the opportunity to cruise it down the interstate with a big rig on your tail...you will begin to realize HP is important...every bit you can sqeeze out of it is important.

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