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Breaking in a new IRC Volcanduro

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I had some IRCs put on my XR250 a couple of weeks ago and so far only have about 10 miles on them. The rear tire is an IRC 110/80-18 Motocross M5B Soft Terrain and is a huge difference on hills.

The front is an IRC 80/100-21 volcanduro VE-35F and has been a handful. Not sure how to describe what it's doing except to say that it seems to have a mind of its own and dances side to side. Since I had the stock tire on there for over two years and 1300 miles maybe I just need to get used to what a real dirt tire feels lke?? Or I'm thinking, and hoping, that it just needs to be broken in so that the side knobs wear down a little. Tire pressure was originally 17ps on both front and back but I lowered it to 12psi and it didn't make much difference. SAG is set correctly and the shock and fork settings are stock.

How long should the break in period take? 50 miles?

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I have never heard of breaking in a tire before but have you checked to see if the bead was seated properly on the rim. If not seated properly, it could cause a wobble. Check your spokes too and see if your rim is spinning true

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I had some IRCs put on my XR250 a couple of weeks ago and so far only have about 10 miles on them. The rear tire is an IRC 110/80-18 Motocross M5B Soft Terrain and is a huge difference on hills.

The front is an IRC 80/100-21 volcanduro VE-35F and has been a handful. Not sure how to describe what it's doing except to say that it seems to have a mind of its own and dances side to side. Since I had the stock tire on there for over two years and 1300 miles maybe I just need to get used to what a real dirt tire feels lke?? Or I'm thinking, and hoping, that it just needs to be broken in so that the side knobs wear down a little. Tire pressure was originally 17ps on both front and back but I lowered it to 12psi and it didn't make much difference. SAG is set correctly and the shock and fork settings are stock.

How long should the break in period take? 50 miles?

i have been running the vulcanduros for years and love them. i run the ve33 front and rear. not totally familiar with the ve35f but i know my ve33 needs breaking in.

when they are new and have sharp knobbies they tend to get really loose. the front end particullarly wants to wash out. as soon as the edges are broken they should begin to hold very well.

double check to ensure your wheels are true and bearing are solid.

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The F is a shorter sidewall tire for 4 stroke use (less sidewall rollover with the heavier bikes). As a rule when the corners (edges) are worn off I replace my tires. I feel that is where you get your bite on the terrafirma from. There seems to be something else going on here.

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when they are new and have sharp knobbies they tend to get really loose. the front end particullarly wants to wash out. as soon as the edges are broken they should begin to hold very well.

'loose' and 'washing out' might be a better way to describe it. The tire is definitely washing out, and frequently, but is not necessarily wobbly. I didn't think that there might be a problem with the bearings or spokes or the bead of the tire but I'll check that.

Thanks to all replies

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rockjockey probably has a pretty good wear meter.

all i am saying is that once the knob edges are broken (not worn) the tire should bite. especially when you weight the front end. it is really important to get forward when diving in to turns.

give it a little time and see what happens.

don't try to break it in on the street. i have also run knobs on the street, as my bike is plated. i have found that knobbies tend to get "dished" from street use. once this happens you will find a entirely new meaning of a loose front end.

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There is no breaking in tires. They just hook up bitchen for the first two hours and then you just have to suffer through to the point that you can justify their replacement.

Not all tires are created equal. If the tire feels weird try mounting it the other direction. If that doesn’t work try a different tire. I’ve had tires on my bike that I rode once and discarded because they were too vague. What’s worse, the cost of a tire or the cost of a broken motorcycle, torn gear and torn flesh due to a poor tire?

I had some IRCs put on my XR250 a couple of weeks ago and so far only have about 10 miles on them. The rear tire is an IRC 110/80-18 Motocross M5B Soft Terrain and is a huge difference on hills.

The front is an IRC 80/100-21 volcanduro VE-35F and has been a handful. Not sure how to describe what it's doing except to say that it seems to have a mind of its own and dances side to side. Since I had the stock tire on there for over two years and 1300 miles maybe I just need to get used to what a real dirt tire feels lke?? Or I'm thinking, and hoping, that it just needs to be broken in so that the side knobs wear down a little. Tire pressure was originally 17ps on both front and back but I lowered it to 12psi and it didn't make much difference. SAG is set correctly and the shock and fork settings are stock.

How long should the break in period take? 50 miles?

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Some tires are directional...Maybe check the sidewall to see if their mounted correctly....Just a thought.

Also,I never liked the IRC vulcanderos ..Didn't last and handled terrible in my opinion.

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The Vulcanduro VE33 is my favorite rear tire, especially considering the price. They also are a relatively long lasting rear tire. The VE33 is rear tire only as it is not made for the front. I tried the IRC VE35 front tire once, and found it to be OK in the loose stuff but treacherous and skatey on medium and harder terrain. I took it off after one day in the desert as it was downright dangerous.

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I tried the IRC VE35 front tire once, and found it to be OK in the loose stuff but treacherous and skatey on medium and harder terrain. I took it off after one day in the desert as it was downright dangerous.

What did you replace it with?

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Some tires are directional...Maybe check the sidewall to see if their mounted correctly....Just a thought.

Also,I never liked the IRC vulcanderos ..Didn't last and handled terrible in my opinion.

When the part of the tire that has the arrow on it is on the ground, the arrow is pointing in the direction of the back of the bike. Does that sound right? The rear tire is mounted with the arrow in the same direction.

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The Vulcanduro VE33 is my favorite rear tire, especially considering the price. They also are a relatively long lasting rear tire. The VE33 is rear tire only as it is not made for the front. I tried the IRC VE35 front tire once, and found it to be OK in the loose stuff but treacherous and skatey on medium and harder terrain. I took it off after one day in the desert as it was downright dangerous.

i stand corrected i have the ve32 vulcanduro up front. i feel he ve32/33 is great all purpose combination with good wear characteristics and price. despite what people may think the knobs have to have the edges broken before they really bite.

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What did you replace it with?

At the time I was riding out of Parker,AZ, and the only front tire the single bike shop had was a (now discontinued) Dunlop K490 front tire. Compared to the VE35, the K490 was a revelation and steered 100 times better in the hard desert terrain. Subsequent to that, I have used Dunlop 756, Dunlop 952 and Michelin S12 tires with good success. I have found the Dunlop 952 to last the longest and hold its edge the best. The Michelin S12 works well but is more susceptible to pinch flats due to its soft sidewalls. The Dunlop 756 works very well until the knobs start to round off.

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i feel he ve32/33 is great all purpose combination with good wear characteristics and price. despite what people may think the knobs have to have the edges broken before they really bite.

This monday or tuesday I'm going to take the bike to a riding area around here that has a good mix of sandy atv trails, gravelly/dirt roads, and very rocky 4WD roads. It'll be about a 2 to 4 hour ride. If on my way back, especially after the rocky part, I don't feel some improvement, I'm going to call the shop I got the tire from and see what they say about it. This is the first time I've bought a dirt bike tire so I don't know what the return policy is. I'm guessing I won't get a refund or exchange? If they won't exchange it I'll give another shop a shot at it, especially if they have an IRC VE33 or a Dunlop 952, which sounds like it might be worth a try.

The guy at the shop who suggested the tires to me is more of a motocross guy, although after a long discussion with him about suspension, tires, and the kind of riding I do, I thought he knew what I needed.

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Turns out the problem may not have been the new front tire, but the new rear tire. Stock rear tire size for '02 XR250 is 100/100-18. The replacement tire put on there a few weeks ago was 110/80-18. I'm not sure exactly how much that dropped the rear relative to the front (maybe 1/2"?), but it seems to have been enough to affect the suspension. Didn't really want to adjust the rear shock preload from where it's at( around 100mm race sag and 25mm static sag); because of my weight I'm near or at the limit of what the shock can handle. I was going to raise the forks 5mm to see what affect that would have, but it appeared that the part of the fork that gets clamped is beveled. I could only raise them about 1mm.

I ended up buying yet another rear tire, a Dunlop D756, that is the stock size 100/100-18. That did the trick. Today I went on a 30 mile ride and the problem I had with the front tire dancing around, even when riding straight, was gone. :thumbsup:

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Turns out the problem may not have been the new front tire, but the new rear tire. Stock rear tire size for '02 XR250 is 100/100-18. The replacement tire put on there a few weeks ago was 110/80-18. I'm not sure exactly how much that dropped the rear relative to the front (maybe 1/2"?), but it seems to have been enough to affect the suspension.

Interesting! I think the 110 tire would (at least in theory) be about .31" taller than the 100 tire. I'm surprised that would affect the suspension feel that much - although the tire could have been a good bit taller or shorter than what the manufacturer says. I'll keep the info in mind when selecting tires. I wonder if that height difference could contribute to some riders saying that a particular tire 'washes out' while other riders rave about the same tire? :thumbsup:

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I think the 110 tire would (at least in theory) be about .31" taller than the 100 tire.

From reading search results concerning tire size, I figured the tire height differences went this way:

The 110 of the 110/80 is width in mm, and 80 is the tire height as a percentage of that width so that .80*110=88mm.

To compare with a 100/100, the height and width are both 100mm so that

100mm height of the 100/100 minus the 88mm height of the 110/80 is 12mm.

There's what, 25.4mm to an inch? So the height of the 110/80 is approximately 1/2" lower than the 100/100.

I think that's right.

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Add in to the equation that the "F" series tire may have had a shorter sidewall in addition and your bike thinks you set the sag wrong and had the rear riding to low which put more weight on the rear tire and caused the front to wash.

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Im on a 2003 kx125 and i ride very VERY rocky single track, and yes its on a 125 w/o a flyweel weight.(just to get you the idea of what and how i ride) So my first ride on the VE33 was in the sand in new jersey and the second ride was back at my local rocky woods in New york and the tire actually ended up ripping underneath one of the knobbies to the tube nd got a flat. personally, the tire felt awsome to me before it teared, but was extremely dissapointed when it did. This happen to anyone else or anything similar????

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