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is the 230 rear shock height adjustable?

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Can the seat height of the 230 be adjusted via lock rings around the rear shock like mx bikes? Basically, does it have adjustable race sag? :thumbsup:

I'm thinking model years 2004 and newer. My g/f is great for this bike but its about 2 inches too tall.

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The "sag" is adjustable as with most off-road / MX bikes. If you loosen the adjustments fully, the seat height will be lower, but that is not what the pre-load adjustment is for.

There are "lowering" links available for his bike. One that I have heard of is the KOUBA link. If you do a search I feel certain you will find info on it.

A lowering link will be a better option in your quest to lower the bike. It will only take a few minutes to install.

Good luck and ride safely.

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yes...thats pretty much what it does. u turn it clockwise it gets sitffer/harder...u turn it counter-clockwise it gets softer

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yes...thats pretty much what it does. u turn it clockwise it gets sitffer/harder...u turn it counter-clockwise it gets softer
From the perspective of looking down at it? And what do you use to turn them?

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Im bringing this old thread back up......

Im having a difficult time unlocking the top shock spanner collar..

I just want to make sure that I am trying to turn it the right way....

My seat is removed, if I am looking down on the shock which way do I punch the top spanner ring to unlock it: clockwise or counterclockwise

Im using a flat head and hammer and it isnt budging counterclockwise or clockwise. Also used WD40

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The shock is a standard right-hand thread. Turn it counter-clockwise if looking from the top down. You can spin the spring once the lock nut is loose. Do NOT use a flat-head screwdriver - Use a drift pin, punch, or a long stud bolt.

As Mike Coe stated earlier, you need to be ce careful with preload - See here: http://brucessuspension.com/kb6.htm I've spoken with Bruce on many occasions and he really knows what he's talking about. I quoted a little bit about his thoughts on preload below:

"OK. So lets suppose you decide that you won’t spend your money on a new spring, and will just run more race sag and less preload to make the suspension work easier. WRONG. The amount of stored energy you are going to reduce by backing off the preload will be more than offset by the additional secondary stored energy that will be added by increasing race sag. So, if you run too much race sag, the secondary preload goes way up and the suspension will become harsher on the small bumps. In addition, the rising rate linkage that the shock is hooked to (or the tapered needle inside on a PDS shock) will be in the harder part of its travel. I hope I have convinced you to use the right spring, which will guarantee a smoother ride. I have used the rear spring in this article, but the front suspension works the same way, only using lighter springs."

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the lowering link is a great idea, doubtful about the value, $133.00US, as soon as you install it the kick stand will be too long and you will break your brake lever.

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