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What brand of oil ?

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Just curious as to what brand of oil you peeps are using. I'm too new to form my own opinion...so I'll ask the opinionated :thumbsup: BTW, it goes in a '06YZ250F.

Thanks

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I run Yamalube, dude...check out the YZ450F fourm, their are like a ton of oil threads, tons!

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Some basic oil info: http://www.thumperfaq.com/oil.htm

Whatever you pick, petroleum or synthetic (there are 3 different types of synthetics), get a motorcycle specific oil that is API SG/JASO MA. (Best to just avoid all car oils and Rotella. Rotella doesn't have as robust an add pack(high pressure additives to protect your gears and cam) as an SG motorcycle oil , and many car oils have additives that will make your clutch slip.)

If any machine needs an synthetic though, it's a screaming 250 or 450! http://www.maximausa.com/technical/lubenews/LubeNews2002.pdf

I absolutely prefer Maxima Extra, an ester synthetic and the best oil I have been able to find! Maxima has the best add pack in the business. http://www.maximausa.com/products/4stroke/maxum4synthextra.asp

What part of BC do you live in?

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i run yamalube in mine i know a machnic and he said that the trans and clutch are all made to go with yamalube. thats why i get the factory oil filters too. they were built around yamalube.

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i use mobil 1 extended performance 15w-50. bike seems to like it, and you can get it at walmart. whatever oil you choose just remember to change it often. :thumbsup:

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i use mobil 1 extended performance 15w-50. bike seems to like it, and you can get it at walmart. whatever oil you choose just remember to change it often. :thumbsup:

Good luck with your Mobil 1 Wally world oil . Mobil oil Company says don't use their automotive oil in a wet clutch environment. They produce a motorcycle specific oil for that. Look for the JASO MA rating which tells you that an oil is wet clutch safe.

Dwight

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Good luck with your Mobil 1 Wally world oil . Mobil oil Company says don't use their automotive oil in a wet clutch environment. They produce a motorcycle specific oil for that. Look for the JASO MA rating which tells you that an oil is wet clutch safe.

Dwight

i am aware of this. the ep is basically the same as the mx4t i believe. mx4t is higher in phosphorus and zinc. it works fine. no clutch problems at all.

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Ydogsfly-It's your bike do what you want, just so you are aware that you are not getting the full protection of the superior add pack that you would get with MX4T!

With bikes in particular, there is a huge turnover. Most folks don't keep a bike for more than a couple of years, then sell it. Maybe you can get away with using whatever wimped out car oil for a while, but in the long run it will shorten the engine/transmission life. But what do you care about longevity when you are going to sell it next year, right? Precisely why I never buy anything used! You don't have any idea what the previous owner did.

One thing to note with both Yamalube and Honda oils. For years they were SG, but in the last year they have quietly gone SJ. This is a DOWNGRADE in the add pack from SG! Why they did this I have no idea??? Maybe a marketing decision to keep the price down and be more competitive on the dealers shelf. Who knows???? Personally, I would no longer use either.

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There is no significant difference between so-called "motorcycle specific" oils and automotive oils, other than marketing gimicks and price. And I challenge any of you to actually make your clutch slip with any commercially available synthetic engine oil. That's pure myth. I hear many riders say to stay away from EC oils for the same reason, that they may make the clutch slip. Bull :thumbsup: t. EC oil only means that it has a lower level of phosphorus and zinc, because these additives can possibly clog up a car's catylitic converter in higher concentrations. The EC nomenclature is all about emmisions.

Since the oil companies had to reduce the phosphorus and zinc to meet the specification, they needed an alternative. There are a hell of a lot of different additives in use, but the most common is a form of molybdenum. This is where the "it'll make your clutch slip" myth came from, but the ironic part is that the form of moly that could actually cause clutch problems is not the type that is used in oils. But the myth is still perpetuated, on bb sites like this, and in trackside discussions between people that just parrot what they read online. But it's nothing more than a myth, regardless of how many people seem to believe it to be true.

And the belieif that "moto-specific" oils are somehow better than automotive oils just isn't true. In most cases, the so-called moto-oils are simply repackaged automotive oils, with a tripled price tag.

The best oil is one that your budget will allow to be changed frequently. While it's true that synthetic oils will last longer before they begin to break down, thermal breakdown and molecular shear is not the enemy for our achines. Contamination is, from dirt, and clutch particles. Frequent changes will allow you to keep the contamination cleaned out, but will also negate any benefits of using synthetic oils.

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I've always used Bel Ray synthetic in my 01, hasn't let me down. I change my oil after ever 3 rides or after each race.

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What part of BC do you live in?

Delta. 15min from Vancouver.

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I use Motul 5100 which is a motorcycle specific oil. I disagree with Chokey, thumpers are very hard on any oil because they have to lubricate both the transmission and the engine. Most automotive oils are designed to lubricate engines not transmissions.

Motorcycle specific oils have more additive packages that IMO hold up longer and are designed for the demands of motorcycle engines.

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Chokey is absolutely WRONG, and he says why himself! Car oils (none of which are API SG anymore) DO NOT have as robust an add pack as an SG motorcycle oil, and therefore do not offer the same level of high pressure protection........plain and simple. You would be selling youself short and being a fool, if you didn't take advantage of that extra protection!

Better oils do cost more money! But, anybody who can afford gas for their bike, can afford the finest oil there is.

Seeing you live near Vancouver (I'm from Chilliwack) where the climate if fairly mild (for that latitude), I would run 10W40 in summer, and maybe switch to 5W30 if the winter turns really cold.

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You are both wrong. There is usually no difference in the additives for so-called motorcycle-specific oils. In fact, there are many diesel and regular car oils out there with comparable and many times much higher amounts of antiwear/acid neutralizing additives. And there are enough instances of motorcycle manufacturers specifying automotive oil to dispel the notion that you have to run a "motorcycle" oil. If your manual specifies an SJ rated oil, then an SJ rated oil will provide all the protection that your engine needs. The JASO MA (motorcycle) oil rating only certifies that that oil has passed a test for acceptable performance in a wet clutch environment. It has nothing to do with the anti-wear additive package, nor does it mean that a non-JASO MA oil wil not perform acceptably in a wet clutch environment.

If anti-wear and acid-removing additives is they key to what you think makes a good motorcycle oil, then if you actually bother to do a little research, you'll find that Shell Rotella T in fact matches or exceeds the additive levels in nearly all "motorcycle specific" oils. So much for motorcycle oils having better additive packages...

Maybe you should do a little research before you stick your foot in your mouth with blanket statements about oil additives.

But it's OK if you want to run "moto-specific" oils at three times the cost if it makes you feel good.

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Cars don't have integrated engines/transmissions. Car oils were never intended by their manufacturers to be thrashed in a transmission. Motorcycle specific oils are designed to be thrashed in a transmission.

It's that simple guys.............

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Cars don't have integrated engines/transmissions. Car oils were never intended by their manufacturers to be thrashed in a transmission. Motorcycle specific oils are designed to be thrashed in a transmission.

It's that simple guys.............

Reconranger, I don't usually jump in on oil threads as this has been covered about a zillion times, but your feeding somewhat false info with your blanket statement about moto specific oils.

1) yes, moto specific oils work great

2) diesel oils work just as well and in some specific oils better (yamalube scores poorly ) than many moto spec oils

3)the basis for your argument seems to be based on the additive packages that moto spec oils have vs. auto/diesel oils. The part of the equation that I haven't heard in your argument is the viscosity, or more specifically, the oils ability to keep its viscosity index over time and use. When an oil thins out, those few molecules of pressure additives won't be enough to protect metal on metal. they are the last barrier and depending on how thin the oil has become, may or may not do their job. Maintaining viscosity is more important than additive package. The transmission grinds up the viscosity improvers in any oil. Some oils hold up better than others in this regard. The only scientific way to judge is send used oiil out to be tested. This has been done many times and discussed here on TT.

The verdict based on these test is: they ALLLLLLL shear out of grade VERY QUICKLY. It is better to use a cheaper oil (diesel oils) and change it very often than to put the expensive oil in and hope that you're getting what you paid for.

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