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Lowering DRZ400E Suspension

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Hi Guy's,

Any suggestions on how I can lower the suspension on my new 2006 DRZ400E without fitting a new suspension link?

I know the links are available from Kouba, but surely you can successfully lower the suspension without modifying the bike with after market components.

My height is 5’7” (Short arse) and weigh about 77 KG (170 LBS) fully geared up. I would like to lower the suspension about an inch or so.

The spring preload adjustment looks as though there is around an inch or so of adjustment but I’m concerned that if I decrease the preload tension the suspension will be too bouncy.

Any suggestions…..

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Three options:

(1) Kouba Link Works pretty good, tends to make the rear a bit softer sprung. Tighten up the preload, or get a stiffer spring. About 1" lower

(2) Shorter Seat Corbin or the Suzuki Gel Seat. Less padding, lower height, about 1" lower

(3) Modified Sub Frame Don't know who does this, but would be $$ expensive, I think. Tight clearances for everything that fits under the seat, it's already really close tolerances & no clearance in stock setup.

I did option #1 & #2, also put a TOPAR top triple clamp & handlebar riser, slid the forks upward in the triple clamps, lowered the ride height about 1 3/4" - 2", can now touch the ground with both feet now (5'8", short legs, 30" inseam). The bike seems to be a bit more stable and slides well on smooth fireroads, but ground clearance is an issue on rough trails. I tightened the rear shock with the standard spring about 1/4"-1/2" of additional preload, still just a tiny bit soft, but works well enough to suit me.

Have a Corbin seat, and although it's much thinner than stock, it's just about the same in comfort, which doesn't say much for the stock seat

With the lowered ride height stance, I'd also strongly recommend a good tough skid-plate, you'll need it ...

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The only way to do it properly is to install spacers in the forks and rear shock, and cut the springs down to match.

The rear suspension works on a linkage so to lower 50-mm you would need a 10-mm spacer.

I did mine and also installed up-rated springs front and rear.

I used a custom rear shock, but it is possible to modify yours.

Neil.

:thumbsup::ride::applause:

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May I ask why you are dead set against the Kouba? I put mine on, set the race sag and lowered the front forks, it runs great for my old man style riding. They are only $70.00 and their service is fantastic. I ordered on a Sunday and forgot to type in my name. I got a call at eight o'clock that night to correct and expedite the order.

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May I ask why you are dead set against the Kouba? / It runs great for my old man style riding.

The Kouba link works great if you aren't an aggressive rider. But if you push the suspension hard, the lowering links cause the shock to blow thru it's travel. Here's an explanation: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=398279

I tried a Kouba #2 link, added a stiffer spring, switched to a #1 link, gave up and had the suspension lowered, like Neil was talking about. Kouba is a good company with a good product, with many happy customers, but for a lot of us the lowering links mess up the suspension action and the ride quality. A Kouba link is GREAT for a certain type of rider, you're one of the lucky ones. :thumbsup:

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I am a bit of an aggressive rider and I'm concerned that the Kouba link will mess up the suspension.

I have had a good look at the seat (stock standard) and I reckon that I could get an upholsterer to take and inch or so off the seat height without compromising the comfort or the suspension.

Has anybody else done this?

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It's very easy to cut some foam out of your seat. It's the first thing I suggested in the link I gave you earlier: lowering your seat height. Pull the staples out of the seat base with pliers, remove the cover, carefully draw lines on both sides of the foam as a cutting guide. Get ahold of an electric carving knife, you will get a much cleaner finish, and cut out 1 1/2" to 2" of foam. Use a foam "sanding block" to smooth the edges if necessary. See pictures in "My Garage" to see the finished shape. Then you just staple the cover back on. It's easy! :thumbsup: ( and you'll be laughing )

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