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2 stroke matienence

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ive heard 2 strokes are more matienece than 4 strokes so thats why i bought one but is there really that much maitence because i am starting to ride mainly trails so i thinking of buying a 2 stroke but i want to know what kinda maitence there is for them

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Actually there is less maintainence. No valves to worry about.

Yep, just top end jobs...Most of the time if you take care of you're 4-Stroke you never have to touch the valves. At least with a Yamaha... :thumbsup:

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This is how two-strokes and four-strokes compare in my opinion. Hopefully this will help you to make an informed decision.

Two-stroke pros:

Snappy, quick and free-revving, instant power.

*Lighter than a four-stroke.

*Far fewer moving parts makes them easier to design and cheaper to manufacture, as well as eisier to work on.

*Engine mods for more hp are cheap and easy.

*Produces approximately 60% more power than a four-stroke of equal displacement in an equivalent state of tune.

*Less prone to low-rpm flame-outs.

* Easy to start when you do stall them.

*Parts and accessories are generally cheaper.

*Maintainance for a serious racer can be much cheaper for a full season of racing.

*Sound output, while at similar decible levels to four-strokes, doesn't carry as far. This is a significant issue in some places.

Two-stroke cons:

*Requires pre-mix oil in fuel.

*Jetting can be very finicky on some models.

*Even stock engines can be prone to engine-killing detonation. Any serious full-race engine mods will require race fuel for the engine to survive.

*Some will say that top-end rebuilds are more frequent, but for a pro racer, I would argue that point. In the hands of a "I can ride a 450 like a 125" pro racer, four-stroke top-ends wear out just as fast as two-strokes. And casually ridden two-strokes can last just as long as casually ridden four-strokes. Just ask any KDX rider.

*Some parts of the country do not allow year-round use of two-strokes on public land.

*Except for Yamaha and KTM, two-stroke development is all but dead.

*Current AMA Racing rules give two-strokes a huge displacement disadvantage.

Four-stroke pros:

*Smooth, easy to use power, much longer spread of power than a two-stroke.

*Better low-end torque.

*The "every-other-revolution" firing order of a four-stroke helps maintain traction in less-than-ideal conditions.

*Jetting tends to be less critical.

*Can run much higher compression than two-strokes before detonation becomes a problem. Even heavily modified engines can often still be run on pump fuel. This can be significant for the racer that's on a tight budget.

*Current AMA Racing rules allow four-strokes an extreme displacement advantage.

Four-stroke cons:

*Some bikes can be prone to sudden flame-outs at low speeds.

* In most cases, harder to start after you do stall it.

* Heavier than two-strokes, with a higher center of gravity.

*Many more moving parts than a two-stroke. This makes them more expensive to design, manufacture, repair, and rebuild.

*Parts and accessories are more expensive.

*Don't kid yourself. Four-stroke engines, when raced, wear out as fast as two-strokes.

*The complexity of the engines makes many riders afraid to attempt things like rebuilds.

*Sound output carries farther than a two-stroke at similar decible levels. This is becoming a serious issue.

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Two-stroke cons:

*Sound output, while at similar decible levels to four-strokes, doesn't carry as far. This is a significant issue in some places.

[/b]

That's a con?

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Pros are the good things.

Cons are the bad things.

It's helpful to know what's good and bad of each style to help with your buying decision.

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Pros are the good things.

Cons are the bad things.

It's helpful to know what's good and bad of each style to help with your buying decision.

Heh, I know what Pros and Cons are. I just think its a pro that the sound of a 2-stroke doesn't travel as far.

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Yep, just top end jobs...Most of the time if you take care of you're 4-Stroke you never have to touch the valves. At least with a Yamaha... :thumbsup:

i think this depends alot on how much and how hard you ride. i know yamaha guys with big miles that have had to do plenty of engine work too, but they do seeem to be pretty good on valves.

all i know about is ktm 2-strokes, which are about the most maintenance-free motorcycles since the xr400 as far as i can tell. i can go 3-5,000 miles on a top end (a year of riding for me, 4-5 years for most people it seems). by comparison, of the 4-strokes i have owned:

klr650 - bulletproof, valves never moved in 20,000 miles after beakin

klx300 - after 5000 miles valves were shot and had to be replaced, at vastly more expense than a 2 stroke top-end or two

husabergfe550 (2005) so far only 2000 hard miles on it. valves barely moved when i've checked them (every 1000-ish miles) and a valve adjust can be done in 20 minutes. still more maintenance than any 2-stroke i've owned tho.

anyway, 2-stroke and 4-stroke each have pros and cons, and chokey enumerated them pretty accurately imho.

mw

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Yes, the 2 stroke is less maintenance, especially the ktm's. After 2 full racing seasons on my 2004 KTM 300, I could still see some of the cross hatch when I held the cylinder up to a light. I had done rings twice before, so this was the 3rd time apart and I just changed the rings again because the piston was in great shape. The ring end gaps weren't even that far off. I have owned kx, cr and yz 250's and they were all about half that life.

The 4 stroke is so much fun to ride though, so much traction, hill climbing is a blast. It's nice to sit on top of a hill climb watching all of your buddies try to spin their smokers up to the top.

I always thought that my thumper was far more finicky with jetting then all of my 2 strokes?! So wouldn't that be a con for a thumper? So many more jets too, and jetting circuits

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