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Just Did First Valve Clearance Check and ??

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I just did the initial valve clearance check on my E model and found all four of the clearances to be .003". I made sure that I have the crank set at TDC on the compression stroke (none of the cam lobes are engaged with the tappets).

Isn't this a little strange? :thumbsup: I realize they all need to be adjusted, but it seems strange that both the intake and exhaust sides were the same?? :ride:

What do you guys think?

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Are you sure that it was at TDC of the compression stroke?Were the lobes of the cams pointing at 10 o'clock (exhaust) and 2 o'clock(intake) when viewed from the left side?

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Yes, I made sure the crank was at TDC comp stroke. That's why I'm somewhat perplexed by the tight clearances.

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Thems is some tight valves if you actually measured correctly. If so then you are going to need to keep a real close eye on them from now on. Once they start to move they just keep picking up speed.

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I confirmed cam lobes are pointing at 10 and 2 o'clock. This motor has only about 90 miles on it. Manual said to check valves initially at 5 hours of service. is going on with this new motor?

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No way they should all be that tight, that is even out of spec for the intakes and way tight on the exhaust.

Are you using a set of feeler gauges with a 45* bend in them? or just flat ones? Are you sure the buckets are pushed down against the shims?

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Could it also be possible to misread the feeler gages.Like perhaps a metric gage in lieu of an SAE or vice versa if you know what I mean?My Sears crapsman 45* gages are dual marked to make the cypherin' a lot easier for those that don't know how to do the metric conversion without looking it up.If so all could be a little better than depicted.For example .13mm is .005118" and .3mm is .011811" and so forth.Hopefully it is just a matter of misreading the gage.

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On my first valve check (@365 miles) one of my intakes were at .003". And one of my exhaust's were at .007" - both under spec. Re-shimmed to .012" and .008" and haven't really moved in 7,000 miles since.

Re-shim , Ride and Recheck , your probably going to be fine . :thumbsup:

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On my first valve check (@365 miles) one of my intakes were at .003". And one of my exhaust's were at .007" - both under spec. Re-shimmed to .012" and .008" and haven't really moved in 7,000 miles since.

Re-shim , Ride and Recheck , your probably going to be fine . :thumbsup:

Your's were only .001" off though, that can be somewhat expected. His exhausts are .005" off, that is totally unacceptable.

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Could it also be possible to misread the feeler gages.Like perhaps a metric gage in lieu of an SAE or vice versa if you know what I mean?My Sears crapsman 45* gages are dual marked to make the cypherin' a lot easier for those that don't know how to do the metric conversion without looking it up.If so all could be a little better than depicted.For example .13mm is .005118" and .3mm is .011811" and so forth.Hopefully it is just a matter of misreading the gage.

My feeler guages are only maked in thousandths of an inch. No metric markings at all. They are the straight type (all I have at the moment), but the .003 and .004 guages are very thin and flexible so I don't think the fact that they are the straight variety is a problem at this point (surely could be with thicker guages). I could only get the .003 to slip in, the .004 wouldn't go even with light pressure.

I'm going to stop by a tool store tonight on my way home and pick up some better quality angled feelers, but I'm sure my current measurements are accurate. :applause:

I guess I really have no option, but to make the necessary adjustments using the shim table in the manual and then just recheck after some more riding. :ride:

Anyone care to give a good estimate for how long I should wait to recheck after I adjust? :thumbsup:

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Depends on how hard you ride. I'd personally give it one good hard ride or a couple of rides with the wife. In fact I'd be checking them about that often for the next several rides just to make myself feel better.

Just think suzuki doesn't recommend an inspection on the S/SM until 15,000 miles :thumbsup: (offroad models are more reasonable at the first 5 hours and then every 20 thereafter. )

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Is most likely cause just a bad set up from the factory? :thumbsup: The bike has run great, first oil change was fine (not too much metal in the oil), no signs of anything else wrong. Hopefully, I will get the clearances back in spec and be OK from here on out.

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Seems to me that it wouldn't have run very well with them that tight. Do the adjustments and let us know how it turns out.

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Any secrets or hints regarding pulling the cams and shimming the valves. I do have a service manual, but those don't always tell you EVERYTHING! Experience is usually the best teacher, and there is certainly alot of experience here! :thumbsup:

Thanks!!

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As soon as you get the valve cover off stuff a clean rag in any openings just in case you drop something,,,,,,like a shim for instance :ride:

Make sure you keep the cam journal bolts in the right holes, they aren't all the same length.

Careful you don't strip out the beforementioned bolts. Either use a good 3/8" torque wrench or just do it by feel.

Check to make sure that you are still TDC when reinstalling the cams.

Cams go at 10 and 2, lobes are pointing away from each other and NOT towards each other as shown in the manual.

Make sure the bike is clean all over but especially the area around and above the valve cover/head.

Don't leave the head uncovered if you are not working on it, at least put a CLEAN shop rag or towel over it.

Most people don't use any rtv or anything else on the valve cover gasket, but there are a few who for some reason can't seem to get it to seal without :thumbsup:

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There is also a "how to" DVD that I remember hearing about. I have not watched it, but other members have said that it was helpful....If your a "visual" kind of person then the DVD may help, other wise follow the manual and take note of the discrepancies as listed by 10guy and others....

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Seems to me that it wouldn't have run very well with them that tight.

Agreed...

Something doesn't add up. At the very least that bike should have been showing a lot of hot start issues with tight valves like that.

:thumbsup:

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they will run just fine with the valves that tight.

there will be no starting issues till they are at 0 clearance.this is why it is so important to check the valves.

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I just did the initial valve clearance check on my E model and found all four of the clearances to be .003". I made sure that I have the crank set at TDC on the compression stroke (none of the cam lobes are engaged with the tappets).

Isn't this a little strange? :thumbsup: I realize they all need to be adjusted, but it seems strange that both the intake and exhaust sides were the same?? :ride:

What do you guys think?

I've got a dumb question. Your engine was cold when you checked the clearences, right? (overnight cold)

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