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Don't feel quite right standing up. Suggestions please...

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This weekend, I went for a ride to try out my bike after putting in the correct springs for my weight. I thank those who recommended I work on the suspension. It is the first thing anyone should do.

I do have a problem while standing though. I am not quite comfortable and don't know how to properly explain.

I feel a bit of discomfort in my lower back indicating I am out of shape (possible) or I am not leaning over in the correct angle. I have pro taper bars. Here is a picture of my cockpit.

http://i12.photobucket.com/albums/a246/mauricedorris/WR450/wr450-3.jpg

Some more information is that when I accelerate while standing, I always have to hold on because I feel as though I am going to get thrown off of the back. I feel like I am always holding on and my forearms tend to cramp up a bit.

Should I be leaning forward more? Do I need lower bars? I have already decided to rotate my levers down a bit. Is there a way to measure the correct bar relationships to my body?

thanks

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1) get in shape

2) stand up alot so you get used to it

3) lean forward under acceleration, and grip the seat with your knees to take the force off your arms. similarly, lean way back under hard braking or steep downhills. i try to keep my weight in such a place that i minimize the forces acting on my hands/forearms.

mw

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You need to be standing with your elbows up, knees slightly bent and squeezing the bike between your legs. Squeezing will take the effort off of your arms. Your arms and hands are there to work the throttle, brake, clutch, steer, etc., your legs are there to hold you onto and control the movement of the bike.

SQUEEEEEEEEZE!!!

It's sort of tough to get your legs in shape for it, but you'll get it.

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When accelerating hard, squeeze the bike with your knees....then loosen up some with the hands so you don't get arm pump, sore wrists, or hand cramps.

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the pain in your lower back is probably you showing your age. nearly everyone from their mid 30s and up have some sort of back problems. It is just from use over time.

I currently ride with 3 herniated disk in my lower back. You can try altering your body position. To ride agressive you will put your back in a position that puts pressure on your lower back.

Try riding with a kidney belt. it helps and also do plenty of core body exercises. The abdominals and lower back muscles that are stronger will help support those damaged disk.

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I had the same problem when i styarted riding 6 months ago.

You just have t o get used to riding while standing up.

On my Wr 250 it was pretty easy to do so. Now on my cr 250 its hard to stay that way for long.

You should be able to see the front plate or the light while standing your knees should be bent so you are siting in the air.

Your feet a little bit on the front teeth of the pegs: /-

Not that much of course. That will help not going back when pinning it.

Youll do the opposite while braking.

Elbows out.

Now do it!

jaja Good luck

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the pain in your lower back is probably you showing your age. nearly everyone from their mid 30s and up have some sort of back problems. It is just from use over time.

back problems aren't from use, they're from lack of use and turning into a fat lazy tub of goo. i'm 45 and i have no back problems. why? because i'm not a fat lazy tub of goo.

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OK, my 2 cents: DON'T squeeze the tank, the grips nor any other part of the bike with your legs or hands when you accelerate and don't "lean" back or forward with your upper body.

Try rolling your bars a little more forward to give you more room to "sink" your knees forward when you hit the gas so that your feet roll forward with the toes pointing down. Stand more on the balls of your feet instead of the instep when doing performance riding so that when your toes point down, they are less likely to hit something. This also provides one more leg joint (your ankles) to become part of your body suspension.

You want to keep your upper body and shoulders a little more upright as if you were snow skiing. Your feet and knees should be doing the work so that the foot pegs push you and the foot pegs hold you back. DON'T stand there flat-footed! Give the bike room between your legs to dance around and to tip left and right without tipping you.

When you sink your knees forward, your waist will be closer to the steering head, your body will be forward but NOT LEANING forward. Don't have your butt hangin' out there behind you when you hit the gas. If you do this correctly, your hands and arms will have little to do and last a lot longer.

Get used to moving your feet all over the pegs to keep your balance and the forces of acceleration and braking centered through your feet and the foot pegs. Keep at it until you can tip the bike all over the place, hit the brakes and hit the gas with a very light grip on the bars. When you can do this, you will be able to use the bars for advanced stuff instead of depending upon them to keep you attached to the bike.

It feels really really good when you get it right!! :thumbsup:

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back problems aren't from use, they're from lack of use and turning into a fat lazy tub of goo. i'm 45 and i have no back problems. why? because i'm not a fat lazy tub of goo.

The part about not being in shape was just me poking fun at myself. I am in decent shape (so I think anyway). I could always loose 10 or 15lbs, but who couldn't at my age. I am kinda used to the "tough love" I get on TT, but you guys are giving me a complex! :thumbsup:

41yr old, 5-10, 205lbs. I ride standing up 85% of the time already and really only sit when turning at speed. btw... most people over 30 DO NOT necessarily have back problems. :ride:

However, the bars just don't feel quite comfortable. Let me rephrase the question in a way where I might get a different answer.

How do you determine what is the correct bar height and position? Is there a measurement of some sort. There are many bars with different heights and bends and several top clamps to move the bars back and/or forward. What is the proper way to measure what the best position of the bars should be? I do like the suggestion that I should be able to see the light on the front.

thanks (now I've got to go get some slimfast!)

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back problems aren't from use, they're from lack of use and turning into a fat lazy tub of goo. i'm 45 and i have no back problems. why? because i'm not a fat lazy tub of goo.

Hahaha.I'll pass that along to my 200lb 5'10" office working bro in law.It should explain alot!Personally,I'm 5'10" 140lbs and 41 yrs old.My back isn't the best-or hip-or neck-or arms,but then,I've worked in a garage all my life :thumbsup: I ride my mtn bike 3-4 times a week and do some light weight stuff but old age does creep up.I agree with some of the above especially about holding on with your legs but I had similar standing comfort issues with both my SX and EXC and I could never quite get it sorted out but always wondered if it was a bar height issue.When I got the Berg I put 1" risers on them.They put me in a good upright neutral position and I feel far more comfortable than with either KTM.Would risers have worked on the KTM's?Probably.They're much cheaper than bars and certainly well worth a try.I went back and reread your post Maurice.It all sounds familiar.I tried the bars lower,farther ahead and back and had the same sensations you did.I would assume,from what worked for me anyway,is that the lower you are the more scrunchy your riding position and the more you have to hang on with your arms(and strain your back)-and get blown back and forth.Standing more straight up on the other hand,makes it easier to hang on with your legs and take the strain off your arms and stay centered easily.It doesn't give you that cool looking racer crouch but in my state whenever I crouch I wonder if I'll be able to straighten up again :ride:

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Sounds like you might be to cautious, I was when I first got my RM, I never stood up because I thought I might hit the band or something and loose grip. I took it trail riding with my Thumper buddies and i realized that I should stand up because it is easier to trail ride that way.

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Sounds like you might be to cautious, I was when I first got my RM, I never stood up because I thought I might hit the band or something and loose grip. I took it trail riding with my Thumper buddies and i realized that I should stand up because it is easier to trail ride that way.

Not really... as stated, I stand 85% of the time. I am agressive enough to potentially get thrown off of the back of the bike.

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I could always loose 10 or 15lbs, but who couldn't at my age.

umm. well, i couldn't. 6'2, 165 lbs. probably up to 5% body fat since i stopped racing mtn bikes, lol.

ok, i understand better now. i didn't realize that you were normally a standup rider and just having an issue with this bike.

imho, ALL bikes are short in the bars for me. i run a gpr under-bar damper on my 250sx and 2 cm risers on my husaberg, and i run the bars all the way forward. also low pegs on the berg. that puts me in the right position.

i personally am pretty comfortable standing up with the bars lower (like on my 300exc), but only if they are far enough forward. if you have stock bars on a japanese bike, they are probably too low and have way too much sweep for my tastes, but everyone is different. i don't think there's a particular formula, but in general, taller guys that stand alot want the bars higher and further forward. of course there are exceptions to every rule.

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