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jumping improvments?

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I go to the track and ride not to hard. I obviously know this is not jumping suspension, but i was wondering if there is anything anyone has done to improve the suspension without replacing it, for minor jumping?

thanks

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add thicker fork oil :thumbsup:

EDIT:

replace the stock fork oil with 15w and add some spacers to pre-load.

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Add Pre-Load spacers and get 20 Wt. fork oil. Tighten up the rear spring and it will be a world of a difference.

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It might also help if you told us what you were riding. The 150 and 230 are almost identical, but they are still different. The weight between the two and wheel sizes are totally different. Both would effect your decision.

Without that info, however, here's something I would suggest. For $40, Hlebo's suspension will adjust your stock fork springs and give you spacers. Results? Awesome!!! I have CR80 forks, but if I ran the stockers, that would be the ticket. Now remember, your weight and your bikes weight are factors, but for the price, NOTHING can top the result.

As for the rear, I don't know of a cheap fix. You really have to dig deep to fix that if you don't like what you have. I have a spacer on my rear spring and that would probably fix your bike; I got it from Hlebo's, but I also got mine revalved so I don't know the cost. One of these day, I'll put that on my site. Hope that helps.

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where do you tighten up the rear shock?

There's a big washer type looking screw. It covered the entire top of the yellow shock spring. Get a hammer and a big screw driver that you never want to use again or a metal rod or anything you can get. Basically, what you'll do is turn that thing by using the punch or screwdriver to turn it. This is really hard to explain so bear with me. You actually hit that thing to make it turn.

There is a tool that you can do that with, but the normal practice is a hammer and a long piece of metal that will fit in there and turn that. I know. This sounds crazy. Maybe someone else can explain it better than me. Basically, you just want to turn that screw to lower it, thus compression the shock spring.

If you look at it, I think you'll figure it out.

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to preload the rear suspension just do what toneconsultant said, if you've ever preloaded a snowmobile spring its the same way.... take the suspension off and like tone said there is a little metal disc thingy with notches all around it, what you want to do is take the screwdriver and place it in one of the notches the way you want to turn it (lefty loosy righty tighty) then bang away untill you achieve your wanted stiffness

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The only thing you have to remember about tightening the spring preload is that it doesn't help in the least with bottoming resistance. The spring is still X foot lbs to compress. What it will do is make it stiffer in the initial portion of travel so that when you're going up jump faces, it won't compess so quickly and get as squirrely.

Here is the one thing you have to take notice of - it really changes the characteristics of the bike dramatically. If you tighten the rear springs preload a little - the bike will turn a bit sharper. If you turn it a bit more, it'll get to a point where the bike wants to carve on a dime (turn really sharp) but then the stability will start to suffer at higher speeds. So don't go so tight on the rear springs preload that you find that going fast all of a sudden you get a front end that is slapping back and forth (tank swappers) - or when you chop the throttle.

Also the bike with stiffer rear spring preload will be more harsh over smaller bumps - so be preparred for that as well.

Preload isn't really something you use for jumps. It's actually to fine tune between turning & straight line stability as well as proper shock action - but it will help with more mellow jumps that are not G-Out jumps that you crush into....

Have fun - do small increments like 1 turn at a time to see how you like it.

The tool they are talking about is called a SPANNER WRENCH and they're terrible on motorcycle shocks. Use a piece of metal with a flat end either round or small square and a hammer. Break the top nut loose, then tighten the bottom one. Then snug that top one back up after each turn of the bottom ring.

Mike

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The only thing you have to remember about tightening the spring preload is that it doesn't help in the least with bottoming resistance. The spring is still X foot lbs to compress. What it will do is make it stiffer in the initial portion of travel so that when you're going up jump faces, it won't compess so quickly and get as squirrely.

Here is the one thing you have to take notice of - it really changes the characteristics of the bike dramatically. If you tighten the rear springs preload a little - the bike will turn a bit sharper. If you turn it a bit more, it'll get to a point where the bike wants to carve on a dime (turn really sharp) but then the stability will start to suffer at higher speeds. So don't go so tight on the rear springs preload that you find that going fast all of a sudden you get a front end that is slapping back and forth (tank swappers) - or when you chop the throttle.

Also the bike with stiffer rear spring preload will be more harsh over smaller bumps - so be preparred for that as well.

Preload isn't really something you use for jumps. It's actually to fine tune between turning & straight line stability as well as proper shock action - but it will help with more mellow jumps that are not G-Out jumps that you crush into....

Have fun - do small increments like 1 turn at a time to see how you like it.

The tool they are talking about is called a SPANNER WRENCH and they're terrible on motorcycle shocks. Use a piece of metal with a flat end either round or small square and a hammer. Break the top nut loose, then tighten the bottom one. Then snug that top one back up after each turn of the bottom ring.

Mike

THE SPANNER!!!! :thumbsup::ride: That's what I was trying to think of. hahaha. I couldn't remember what that thing was called.

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Land with the gas on and don't be a sack of potatoes when you land. You shouldn't really have that much problem with the stock suspension if you're not riding that hard.

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so i dont repeat anyone here ill just recap on things that are good to do. change susp. oil, add spacers, tighten back susp. and get BBR springs. if your really into track, i reccomend BBR springs.

everyone here gives good advice. im proud. lol

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My BBR Fork Springs were actaully dissapointing for how stiff they were. That's why I run 20 WT at 1 inch from top, 1 inch of spacers and along with the BBR's.

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mod a cr85 front with springs and revalve and works shock on the rear is all you need. It's almost too smooth.

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