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Every single detail needed to perfect cornering in this thread

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Cornering is the most important obstacle in a track, and it comes in a variety of different shapes and sizes. From flat corners, banked or bermed, off camber, rutted, or a combination of any of them, cornering is an especially demanding part of the sport. This thread is a thread that will give you the information that is needed to know so that you have the choice to perfect them.

Here are my tips:

When entering the corner, be standing in the attack position, with one or two fingers on the clutch and same with the brake. The most important difference between pros and amateurs are that pros do not coast, they do not take off the gas without applying the brake. So therefore, when entering a corner, keep the gas on as long as you can, and brake as late as possible. Apply more front brake than rear brake. Although I know many of you (including myself) only use the front brake or the rear, it is essential to use both. A tricky part to cornering is getting a feel for the rear brake. That is, being able to put on enough pressure so that you are using it to stop and not locking it up. Keep the clutch out and kick the bike down into the right gear and allow the engine braking to take its effect.

In the apex of the corner, in one fluid motion go from standing to sitting at the front of the tank with your inside leg out, and applying excessive pressure to your outside footpeg (enough pressure so that it feels like you are almost standing on your one foot, this gives the bike a lower center of gravity, giving the bike more control and also better traction). Keep all your weight on your footpegs and the seat, none on the bars (putting weight on the bars makes your bike top heavy, and makes your front end wash out easier).

Apply the front brake in ruts to keep the front end inside of it. By doing this, you are compressing the forks, and applying downside pressure into the rut, this also makes the bike easier to turn because the bike is closer to the ground when the forks are compressed. Apply the throttle smoothly as you let go of the front brake. The front brake will automatically come off as you twist the throttle.

Well that is about all I know about cornering, please add everything you know.

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I never let the engine do the braking. For me this is a time waster and allows other slower riders to catch up.. Just my 2 cents

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I never let the engine do the braking. For me this is a time waster and allows other slower riders to catch up.. Just my 2 cents

What? Letting the clutch out when you're braking slows you down much faster than the brakes alone. Yeah, slower riders will catch up if you brake with the engine alone.

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you dont brake with the engine alone but you do your downshifting, if needbe(but really i stay in 3rd most of the time) but you hae much more control while braking with the clutch out and you can make tight inside corners after landing a big fast jump or w/e where if u pull in the clutch it speeds up the bike, and makes it easier to be wobbly and unstable and then you cant tell if your locking up your rear brakes which you shouldnt be, and finally that means that you're probably not letting the clutch back out until you get on the gas meaning your riding like a 2 stroke. the best way to turn is brake, then gas, then flick the clutch if needed but not always. i dont want to sound like a know-it-all but i learned from the best.

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I would like to re-emphasize the clutch OUT while braking. Thank you

probably a good point, since if it gets quiet all of a sudden, you know you locked up the rear wheel.

good post.

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thanks, this is something i've been having trouble with. i'm trying to remember everything i did when i rode 80's 6 years ago, but some things i forget. i've been riding the bike horribly in most corners and use the clutch way too much which kills corner speed. thanks for the write up

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I find it extremely helpful to do nothing but cornering for at least an hour per day. It helps you more than you could believe on the track. I have a field near my house and have built a corner track and ride 100 laps each way per day and within 3 weeks I have seriously improved my cornering speed and stability.

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i took a riding lesson today, and the guy told me to weigh the inside peg for a quick moment before you enter the turn because this helps lean the bike over. then immediately afterwards you weigh the outside peg. anyone else do this? i also find it helps to put pressure on your outside leg against the gas tank.

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I do exactly that when I trail ride but that is only because I haven't been to a track yet

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Cornering is the most important obstacle in a track, and it comes in a variety of different shapes and sizes. From flat corners, banked or bermed, off camber, rutted, or a combination of any of them, cornering is an especially demanding part of the sport. This thread is a thread that will give you the information that is needed to know so that you have the choice to perfect them.

Here are my tips:

When entering the corner, be standing in the attack position, with one or two fingers on the clutch and same with the brake. The most important difference between pros and amateurs are that pros do not coast, they do not take off the gas without applying the brake. So therefore, when entering a corner, keep the gas on as long as you can, and brake as late as possible. Apply more front brake than rear brake. Although I know many of you (including myself) only use the front brake or the rear, it is essential to use both. A tricky part to cornering is getting a feel for the rear brake. That is, being able to put on enough pressure so that you are using it to stop and not locking it up. Keep the clutch out and kick the bike down into the right gear and allow the engine braking to take its effect.

In the apex of the corner, in one fluid motion go from standing to sitting at the front of the tank with your inside leg out, and applying excessive pressure to your outside footpeg (enough pressure so that it feels like you are almost standing on your one foot, this gives the bike a lower center of gravity, giving the bike more control and also better traction). Keep all your weight on your footpegs and the seat, none on the bars (putting weight on the bars makes your bike top heavy, and makes your front end wash out easier).

Apply the front brake in ruts to keep the front end inside of it. By doing this, you are compressing the forks, and applying downside pressure into the rut, this also makes the bike easier to turn because the bike is closer to the ground when the forks are compressed. Apply the throttle smoothly as you let go of the front brake. The front brake will automatically come off as you twist the throttle.

Well that is about all I know about cornering, please add everything you know.

Good post, I took lessons from Jim Gibson in S. Cal a few years ago, and basically what he taught for corners. To add to this, he said the transition from gas to brake was 4 things. in one motion it's gas off, front and rear brakes on, weight as far back over the rear fender as you can, and down shift pinching the bike with you knees. Entering the corner the transition is like you described, chin over the number plate, locking forward and out of the corner, never down. smooth throttle transition, and you should be sure to be in the correct gear so the clutch is not needed. In fact, Jim said if he saw me touch the clutch, he would remove it from my bike until the lesson was over.

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so your supposed to leave the clutch out the entire time while braking? wouldnt this be hard on the transmission?

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so your supposed to leave the clutch out the entire time while braking? wouldnt this be hard on the transmission?

No. The engine breaking helps you slow down. I cover it with one finger though so I can pull it in if the corner is tight and I need to lock up the back to slide around.

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Not every SINGLE detail, but I was hoping that people would add in the necessary to make it every single detail, hense

"Well that is about all I know about cornering, please add everything you know."

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