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chain lube

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I know this is a touchy subject for some, and I dont want this to be taken as a flame, but what are you folks out there in Huskyland using to lube your drivechains, if anything.

In the past I have just kept my dirt bike chains clean and coated them with WD40, but a friend of mine swears that his chain lasts longer with lube.

Any thoughts and opinions on this would be appreciated.

BTW-I love my TE250-coolest bike in my garage, and on the trail for that matter.

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Or for that matter, lube vs wax? I tried chain wax to keep the dirt off but I just don't like the chatter (mostly noticed on the street with my TE-610). I think I'm heading back to lube. I'll definitely try the Pro-Gold. Thanks.

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I just use WD40 after a wash, as it is a oring chain so the lube is not getting in to where it is needed. the WD40 is just to stop it locking rusty.

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I just use WD40 after a wash, as it is a oring chain so the lube is not getting in to where it is needed. the WD40 is just to stop it locking rusty.

Correct. Lube has no benefit on an o-ring chain and only serves to attract particulates which ultimately turn into a grinding compound. WD40 after a ride to prevent rust is all you need. After a wet ride I take the WD40 to the chain as soon as possible.

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The rubber O-rings need lube to keep them from drying out and cracking. I still believe in lube for an O-ring chain, something that dries and does not attract dirt to keep the O-rings fresh and the chain from rusting. There is a lot of people that use WD-40 and if it works for you then keep using it but WD-40 will get past O-rings and break down the grease in your chain. Not proven facts, just what I think and I could very well be wrong.

These threads are almost as bad as "what oil should I use".

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I use a real thin lubricating oil after i wash it to keep the o-rings soft and rust away. I used to use WD-40 but a downhill bike pro had a good talk to me one day about it and and now I only use that for breaking bolts loose. WD-40 is a solvent used to penetrate and loosen seized bolts etc. It is not really a lubricate and can actually damage your chain but getting past the o-rings and breaking down the sealed grease. There are some really cool brands of chain wax that I would think would be the best. All that said I used WD-40 for years as well and never had any big issues with it. For me and as much as i ride the chain is going to wear out about as fast as it does and there is not a lot I can do about it. I do notice lubing it sure makes it fiction free until the first deep mud hole.

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In my opinion if you aren't using chain lube on any chain you are mistaken. Modern chain lubes such as BelRay go on very thin and then set up like grease. I believe that they do penetrate in past the o-rings. Makes your chain last longer.

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Last week I picked up a can of Motul offroad chainlube and after a weekend of hard riding in mud and sand the chain looks great-dirty, but no extra filth sticking to the chain because of the lube. It goes on pretty thin, but seems to do the job-I think I will stick with this product for a while and see how the chain (and sprockets) hold up-my buddy Joe, who is a mechanic and pretty smart, is convinced that lube on the rollers not only extends chain life, but also sprocket life.

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I to used WD-40 for years as a chain lube/water displacement, but recently read an article in a publication that I can't remember advising aginst it as it contains too much kerosene. I am currently using Bel Ray chain wax and am satisfied with it. WD-40 is great to for a light coat on the entire bike after washing to really brighten it up and protect aginst the elements. It also makes the next wash much easier.

Dale Wickline

2006 TE-250 ( plated in Maryland )

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For a general protectant, ACF-50 (google it) is hard to beat. Approved and certified by a number of air forces and aircraft manufacturers, among others.

I've also been using 3M teflon lube on my bike chains. Seems to work well, sets up much drier than the usual waxes and lubes, keeping the chain cleaner longer. Won MCN 'Innovation of the month' a year ago.

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