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turning issues,can any one help me!

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hi,i have owned my 06 rmz450 for about 1 and a half months.i am a vet expert rider coming off a 02 ktm 520.i loved that bike but it was time for a new bike so i went with rmz after hearing good things about it especially the turning.the ktm i owned was not supposed to turn good,but turning was never an issue.now for the rmz,i have 6-7 hrs on it,rearsprocket 50t,fork and shock springs for my weight from race tech specs,106mm of sag,front tire bridgestone m201(which i have used generally for the last few years,stock rear tire.i tried multiple fork and shock rebound and compression settings,and have dropping the forks in the triple clamps. I do not have any confidence in the front because when i ride aggresively and drive hard into turns the front end just seems to knife and it slides out .some one please help,ive been told it's a great bike im going to sell it if i cant ride it.

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Thats wierd, i don't own one of these bikes but i rode one a couple weekends back, one of the easiest bikes to corner that i have ever ridden. Maybe you should try to get accustomed to it, all bikes take some time to get used to especially when you are switching brands. Thats the most help i can give but i bet someone else on here will have more info for you in a short while. hang in there

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First off, you are going in the correct direction with your rear sag, then sliding the fork tubes up (mine are up about 3mm higher than stock), and playing with compression and rebound. You want to back off on compression so the front will settle, and you want enough rebound so it stays settled. Also, if you upped the front spring rate, you'll need less compression. Also make sure you don't have excessive rear rebound, as that would tend to hold the rear down in corners and therefore not turn as well.

That said, I think your problem is your front tire choice and then maybe handlebars. The RMZ came with bridgestone 401A in the larger 90/100 size...why are you running a 201? Are you running the 201 in the larger RMZ size of 90/100 or are you running a 80/100? My RM250 2-stroke came with 201 80/100 front and although you say you've used them on other bikes, in my opinion they aren't the best choice. I always switched to a Dunlop 490 or close equivalent of that on my Rm250. (FYI on my RMZ, when my stock 401A wore out, I tried the larger Dunlop 742F on the front of my RMZ and that was awful. I put a new 401A bridgestone back on)

Per Bridgestones website regarding the 401 tire " M401 features a new casing shape with larger casing volume for increased contact patch, better damping, bump absorption and exceptional straight line stability. M401 offers new block placement for continual contact at all lean angles and increased breaking grip."

Most people say the RMZ turns great and they usually say that after riding the bike new with the stock bridgestone tires, so I would recommend putting the 401A 90/100 on and then see how it works for you (with the fork tube height change and clicker changes).

Another thing might be the handlebars. Are you running the stock Renthal fat bars? They have a height of 80mm and a sweep of 57mm. I have found over the years that a 'straighter' bar, i.e. one with less sweep, is both more comfortable on the wrists and also makes you sit slightly more forward. I immediately switched to a Pro Taper bar as Renthal didn't offer a bar with less sweep. I got the Carmichael bend, which has a height of 77mm and a sweep of 55mm. Being slightly lower also allowed me to 'lean more forward' in the turns.

And finally, as the old 'adage' goes...." are you sitting on the tank in the corners?". Look at all the motocross pics of the pros, their helmet is almost always directly over the handlebars going into a corner. Again, that's where the lower/straighter bar helps as it tends to force you more forward automatically. If you are tall, a taller seat helps as its flatter and makes it easier to sit more forward on.

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the tire may be the issue but i know alot of guys put on that size tire without any problems,but worth a try to eliminate that as a problem.did you say that you raised the forks higher in the triple clamps,because i thought i read to lower forks in triple clamps.as for getting forward on the bike.i try but that is also a bit of a problem i a 5-7 155lbs.it feels like i cant get forward enough,the power and the way the seat is i feel like im back further than i should be.i cut the seat down to keep me forward but it is not enough.almost feels like i need to sit by the gas cap but cant seem to get or stay there.i also have put a lower straighter bar because that what is comfortable for me

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On the front tire, you I take it by your comment that you are using the smaller 80/100 size. I too have heard of people doing this and 'not having a problem', but again, I would point to what brand/model tire they were using. Again, I don't think the Bridgestone 201 in 80/100 is a good choice. If you want to use the smaller 80/100 size, then I would suggest investigating into a Dunlop or Michelin.

To turn better, you need to push the forks up higher in the triple clamp (ie top of fork gets closer to the bottom of the handlebars. If you have been lowering (pushing down) in clamps, then that could be your problem! Visualize a Harley Chopper with those long raked front forks. Those don't turn very well. Lowering the forks is going in the direction of 'adding effective rake angle', raising the forks is the opposite, allowing quicker turning.

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the tire may be the issue but i know alot of guys put on that size tire without any problems,but worth a try to eliminate that as a problem.did you say that you raised the forks higher in the triple clamps,because i thought i read to lower forks in triple clamps.as for getting forward on the bike.i try but that is also a bit of a problem i a 5-7 155lbs.it feels like i cant get forward enough,the power and the way the seat is i feel like im back further than i should be.i cut the seat down to keep me forward but it is not enough.almost feels like i need to sit by the gas cap but cant seem to get or stay there.i also have put a lower straighter bar because that what is comfortable for me

vin5, we have had the same issues with our 06 450 and here are a few things learned. I will probably get hate mail from the Suzuki RMZ owners, they love their bikes, as they should. I am an old expert rider as you so I kind of know how to set up my bikes. In my opinion the RMZ tends to turn more on the front wheel than other bikes. We tried a lot of things and no matter what, it turns very quick and tends to knife sometimes. Also the front forks seemed to get soft after break in. Our best set-up was to hold up the front with a re-valve, set the forks with the line just below the upper clamp and play with the sag at 100 to 105mm. A lot of people run more rear sag, I think to slow down the steering, but my son said it felt really choppered out with more than 105mm. The Suzuki will turn no matter what so hang on and be ready.

One final thought, not every rider has the same style. My son and I have always been riders who turn more with the rear wheel and could not ever come to terms with the quick turning Suzuki. Hope this helps.

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thanks for the input,ive never owned a bike that knifes in turns like that,so it may be my style and the bike just dosent suit me.i have never had a problem adjusting to bikes ever.most bikes i have owned have been yamahas and my last one a ktm,none of them were ever quick turning machines.i also like to steer with the rear wheel.i dont want to give up so ill try riding and adjusting suspension afew more times before i sell it. if that dosent work ill sell it and buy a yamaha.so far i am dissapointed with my suzuki.

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thanks for the input,ive never owned a bike that knifes in turns like that,so it may be my style and the bike just dosent suit me.i have never had a problem adjusting to bikes ever.most bikes i have owned have been yamahas and my last one a ktm,none of them were ever quick turning machines.i also like to steer with the rear wheel.i dont want to give up so ill try riding and adjusting suspension afew more times before i sell it. if that dosent work ill sell it and buy a yamaha.so far i am dissapointed with my suzuki.

Good luck, my son loved his RMZ other than what we talked about. We have always been on Yamahas also and just got back from the Yamaha shop that helps us. We will be on a 06 YZ with 22mm offset clamps until the new bikes get here. The motor does not seem as strong as the Suzuki but the YZ is stock and the RMZ has some mods. I can see why people love the RMZ-450 as it is a great bike but for our style looks like we are back to Yamaha's.

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I too have had issues with my RMz sliding the front end out from underneath me in turns but only when I put any weight on the front in a turn.

I know you are suppose to be on the tank with the weight on the front wheel in turns but this causes problems on the RMZ.

Next time you are out riding try sterring the bike with the throttle and keep your weight off the front end,the bike will turn perfect.

Next turn slide your weight forward and use less throttle in the turn and the bike will knife really bad.

I have always rode ZOOKs and could always slide forward on the tank to turn.

It seems the Suzuki is better when new but when its broke in sterring changes.

I just keep off the front wheel when turning and have no problems with the bike.

Maybe its still a search for the correct setup and if you find it let us all know.

Ricky sure has it figured out!!

TPMX

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went riding yesterday and think that i may have begun to figure it out.as recommended i put the stock front tire back on.with the stock front tire and dropping forks 5mm seems to help,but ithink what also helped was that i stopped trying to get so far forward on the bike.as advised if i sit in a more neutral position the bike turns better.i guess the bikes i have ridden in the past have always needed me to get as far forward as possible to turn.not so with the suzuki.center of the bike seems to work.also by accident i changed the rear tire and put the wrong size on.when i got to the track my buddies said that my tire looked small.it was.i had put a 100-90-19 on by accident.i rode with it and believe it or not it seemed to work pretty good.it tracked well and gave me a little more rear tire spin to steer better with the trottle.plus smaller tire will make the bike a little lower in the back.i dont know if that will work for everyone.ill have to put the right size on and see if there is a big difference.thanks for the help i appreciate it.

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Suzukis don't seem to require the effort that other bikes do to make tight corners. When i rode my 06 YZ250F, i can feel myself setting up for a corner and the bike flows nicely (its not bad at last minute decisions either) but on the RMZ450 i rode, i felt like i could rush into a corner, hit the rear brake slide the rear around and power out. IT just seemed to be good at switching direction easily and confidently. I personally loved it. Having said that, i have never ridden any of the other 06s. I am still undecided which one i would go for, which means they are all great.

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vin/tptp: You guys are both right regarding riding position. With the RMZ you dont need to be sitting over the hangers when you take a corner, if you do, you put too much pressure on the front wheel and it will knife. The RMZ already has a steep steering angle and excellent geometry. What I have learned is that you need to keep you weight slightly forward but generally more neutral, weight the outside peg and lean it over a bit. As you begin to straighten up and add more throttle you should slide forward so the bike doesnt wheelie.

I have never had any luck by really getting up too far forward and turning through a corner, you need to keep relatively neutral and let the bike take the corner. I have tried my technique on a CRF 450 06 and it doesnt seem to work as well, they have a more swept out front end and tend to go in a straight line more rather than tucking into the corner like the Zook.

I have had amazing success with letting the bike take the corner as it wants to and not trying to fight it. As others have mentioned, it doesnt take as much effort to corner, trust me you will get used to it and then you will never want to go back!

The only thing I dont like is the mushy front brake!

Happy riding.

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I agree with you on the front brake, that is the first thing i noticed when i hopped on it, the lever felt slim and cheap and it felt like a bicycle brake (too mushy). But i guess you can get used to that, and a quick fix would be to replace the levers with ASVs, i love them on my yami.

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I agree with you on the front brake, that is the first thing i noticed when i hopped on it, the lever felt slim and cheap and it felt like a bicycle brake (too mushy). But i guess you can get used to that, and a quick fix would be to replace the levers with ASVs, i love them on my yami.

Another problem with the front brake is the solid rotor, a floating rotor will make the front brake more up to par.

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Another problem with the front brake is the solid rotor, a floating rotor will make the front brake more up to par.

I dont think its the rotor or the lever (I quite like the lever). When you pull the lever in the feel just doesnt have any power to it. Try pulling in a CRF front brake lever and its hard instantly and takes a lot of force to squeeze. ie. The brake is powerful.

Im not sure where the issue is but the brake just doesnt feel strong, even when just sitting on the stand. Funny thing was was that it was on par with my CRF when it was brand spanking new, but it faded so fast and bleeding only improves it a tiny bit.

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One other thing you may want to consider (if you haven't already) is to change to lighter springs (f+r) as at 155lbs. the stock springs are way to stiff for that weight.

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I dont think its the rotor or the lever (I quite like the lever). When you pull the lever in the feel just doesnt have any power to it. Try pulling in a CRF front brake lever and its hard instantly and takes a lot of force to squeeze. ie. The brake is powerful.

Im not sure where the issue is but the brake just doesnt feel strong, even when just sitting on the stand. Funny thing was was that it was on par with my CRF when it was brand spanking new, but it faded so fast and bleeding only improves it a tiny bit.

I am kind-of new to posting on Thumpertalk, but have been following it for some time. There is a lot of good info and a lot of knowlegable people on here so I only hope to help other riders with their problems and keep these forums as good as possible. I spent a lot of time and effort on the front brakes as with other things on our RMZ. To keep this short the front brake assy off one of my other bikes with a killer front brake was weak on the Zook and the assy off the Zook was back to killer on the other bike. The only difference was the floating rotor. The floating rotor will allow the caliper to stay aligned much better and this greatly improves the lever travel and firmness.

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I am kind-of new to posting on Thumpertalk, but have been following it for some time. There is a lot of good info and a lot of knowlegable people on here so I only hope to help other riders with their problems and keep these forums as good as possible. I spent a lot of time and effort on the front brakes as with other things on our RMZ. To keep this short the front brake assy off one of my other bikes with a killer front brake was weak on the Zook and the assy off the Zook was back to killer on the other bike. The only difference was the floating rotor. The floating rotor will allow the caliper to stay aligned much better and this greatly improves the lever travel and firmness.

I am fully aware of how killer a floating disc is, trust me I have seen them, they are awesome. But my personal feeling is that unless the lever is firm when the bike is on the stand, there isnt enough pressure being built up, ie, the master cylinder is shit, the brake line is spongey or the caliper has air bubbles in it.

I understand that a caliper can get a better grip on the disc if it is floating, however this wont make a weak caliper stronger, the weakness is essentially air bubbles and lack of fluid pressure. Whether that be in the MS, brake line or piston

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This forum wen't from turning to brakes somehow but brakes are worth talking about. The purpose of the floating rotor is not to grip better but to move somewhat when the caliper pushes against it. Anything that will allow the caliper to move less when applied {miss-alignment, bent rotor, dragging caliper slide} will improve the feel at the lever. Trust me it does not take much to make a huge difference.

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