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cooking right leg

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I am on the verge of buying a DR650, but I have read some posts and reports of the DR650 cooking right legs. I live in Texas, and it is hot here 6 months of the year. I will do mostly street riding, some commuting, and a little dirt road riding. What's the story? Will the DR650 cook me?

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Not if you wear proper off road motorcycle boots , also if tune the carb it will run cooler as i believe they run lean from the factory. :thumbsup:

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mines stock...if you wear pants you'll have no problems at all....if you wear shorts you might notice a little warm on your leg but i wouldnt call it "cooking"

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A couple months ago I lost my heat shield off the stock header....

Whew, I only rode it twice before I was on the phone for replacements.

It's hot in houston but I always wear boots!

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it runs noticeably hotter in the dirt than on the street cuz youre on the throttle more, tire spin more etc. but i wouldnt say its that bad. while shorts and flip flops are not recommended attire you can do it and the bike wont burn you.

i wonder about the overheating. anybody know how long you can let a DR idle before worrying about hurting the engine?

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When I mean cooking, I mean feeling uncomfortably hot if I have to sit in traffic for a little while, or going down the highway. I always wear pants and riding boots (street style).

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I never noticed any excessive heat on my right leg when I had my DR650 and it is always hot down here. I do wrap all my bikes header pipes with header wrap, for ridding in hot climates you cannot beat the stuff.

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You'r right leg will be warmer than the left, I ride in shorts alot in the summer w/out being uncomfortable.

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When I mean cooking, I mean feeling uncomfortably hot if I have to sit in traffic for a little while, or going down the highway. I always wear pants and riding boots (street style).

if you always wear pants you'll not have any problems....especially if you're going down the highway....

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Mine bothers me when wearing shorts in stop and go traffic, otherwise, I don't notice it.

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Rode mine quite a bit in 95+ heat. The oil cooler transfers a ton of heat on your right leg but only noticable poking along in traffic and going slow if you wear decent mc boots and heavy pants. There are much worse motorcyles to ride in the heat. Really not an issue

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mine does mostly street work as an SM, and I notice the right side heat, but do not find it excessive. On some of the +100º days last month, I found my self 'airing' my right leg after a stop light. But I also found myslef in other strange behaviour like parking under lawn sprinklers on my way home... go figure.

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I never really noticed...I guess thats good! This is riding in 95 and 14 degree temps. I always wear pants and Chucks in the summer and double pants and boots in the winter.

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I kinda noticed it on a recent trip while sitting in traffic in hot weather, but my pillion really noticed it. Poor girl.

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Highway pegs get it out of the heat. So will putting your foot on the outside of the peg. I figure it's sharing the suffering with the bike anyway, imagine how it feels on that 100 degree day :thumbsup:

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