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TORQUE WRENCH??? What is a good one that will not break my a$$?

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Seriously, :ride: what is a good TORQUE WRENCH to used on my bike? It needs to be able to torque at low ft pounds as everyone already knows. Everything that I find is totally expensive!!! Looking to spend like a max of $50.00 bucks if possable.

:thumbsup:

Thanks...

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I got a Craftsman one, cost $80, but it's good. Goes from 0-150 Ft/lbs. They also had a cheaper one, without the click adjustment, it had a gauge...it was around $30 @ Sears.

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I can't find one at sears that goes below 10ft pounds unless I smoked my lunch or something... :ride:

http://www.sears.com

I think I would go for a $80.00 dollar one. Think you could get the PN# off of yours for me? :thumbsup:

Thanks...

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I can't find one at sears that goes below 10ft pounds unless I smoked my lunch or something... :ride:

http://www.sears.com

I think I would go for a $80.00 dollar one. Think you could get the PN# off of yours for me? :thumbsup:

Thanks...

I'm on my laptop, down in Detroit right now...I will be home Wednesday (start working Weds). So I can hook you up then, but until then...someone else I'm sure could help ya out.

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I agree - craftsman for that kind of oney. I have had mine for 2 years and it works great. Get one that goes down to about 10. And dont get those cheap ones that have a dial.

The one I bought, 10-75 lb range that fits almost everything on my bike) is on sale for $64 now:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?cat=Mechanics+Tools&pid=00944594000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Torque+Wrenches&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes

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Information for torque wrench users, that may help in the selection. Clicker style wrenches are not as accurate as gauge style. they are just more convenient to use. Also all torque wrenches are designed to be used from 20% to 100 % of the gage range. So for example if you have a 0-100 pound wrench, you should only use it for torques 20 pounds and above. The most accurate wrenches and still have some convience to them are gage style, with an indictor light that lights when you hit the torque you preset on it. Find an auto mechanic or somebody that gets discounts from Snap on. they make the best tools no exceptions. and they are guaranteed. Craftsman guarantees their hand tools, but not torque wrenches. I broke one of theirs a week after my bought it for me for xmas, and they would not replace it.

My experience is from being a quality assurance inspector for naval nuclear reactors. We recieve training in torque wrench use, and application.

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Seriously, :ride: what is a good TORQUE WRENCH to used on my bike? It needs to be able to torque at low ft pounds as everyone already knows. Everything that I find is totally expensive!!! Looking to spend like a max of $50.00 bucks if possable.

:thumbsup:

Thanks...

Then get one from Sears (Craftsman) and stay away from the beam type. Get a clicker. With the bikes being low torque values, you might have to get a 1/4" drive, possibley even a 3/8" drive. I find to do everything on a bike, you willneed both. But in reality, many torques arent that critical, bu tthose that are, are usually low torque, ie cam caps. I have a Matco flex head 1/4 drive for the small stuff, but cost was $210. I have a Craftsman 3/8" drive that goes up to 75 lbs and as low as 5 foot lbs, so it really has the msot coverage on the bike. I dont know if you could get one for $50, maybe closer to $75 from Sears. But dont go cheap here and when you dont, run it down to min torque to keep it accurate for many years. The the cream of the crop are the dial types or now digital types, but super spendy, probably not for you. If the one you find is avaliable with a flex head, always get it!

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Information for torque wrench users, that may help in the selection. Clicker style wrenches are not as accurate as gauge style. they are just more convenient to use. Also all torque wrenches are designed to be used from 20% to 100 % of the gage range. So for example if you have a 0-100 pound wrench, you should only use it for torques 20 pounds and above. The most accurate wrenches and still have some convience to them are gage style, with an indictor light that lights when you hit the torque you preset on it. Find an auto mechanic or somebody that gets discounts from Snap on. they make the best tools no exceptions. and they are guaranteed. Craftsman guarantees their hand tools, but not torque wrenches. I broke one of theirs a week after my bought it for me for xmas, and they would not replace it.

My experience is from being a quality assurance inspector for naval nuclear reactors. We recieve training in torque wrench use, and application.

Really? I got a craftsman and it has a 1 year warranty.

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I would get on eBay and find a used snap-on dial torque meter. I have a meter style snap-on that goes from 0-150 inch pounds(12ft lbs) and use it mostly for adjusting diesel injectors. Cummins even specifies "do not use a clicker style torque wrench to set injectors".

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Snap-on digital:thumbsup: At only $800 it is worth its weight in Gold!

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I use a craftsman clicker type, 3/8 drive, covers mostly everything. If you really want to get fancy though, my neighbor has a 300 dollar 1/4 drive clicker snap on, ive borrowed it before and man is it nice.

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You just about need two of them for motorcycle use. A small inch/lb version and a 3/8" drive lb/ft version.

As far as brand goes, spend every penny you possibly can. Granted, hobbyist like ourselves does not need top of the line, but if you buy something decent, it can last the rest of your life and then some.

20 years from now do you really want to grab for a torque wrench and have some POS from Harbour freight to rely on?

Not that their stuff is that bad. I have a 1/4 inch drive torque wrench from harbour that is ok. However, I have a lot more confidence working with my snap-On-Digital wrench that came with my yz 250. I never would have bought the wrench because of the cost. That was a mistake.

Owning the Harbour wrench just puts me 40.00 further away from where I want to be.

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I recommend Wright Tool. Professional grade tools for less $$ than Snap-On, MAC, MATCO, etc.

Check a few different distributor's prices, as I've noticed significant differences in pricing. Send me a PM and I'll check with my contact if you would like.

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I know this won’t be popular with guys that spent a lot of $$ on torque wrenches (this caused a lot of disagreement in our shop) but…unless you are carefully controlling a lot of other factors it makes absolutely no difference which wrench you use.

Bolt torque is an INDIRECT measure of bolt tension and ultimately clamping force. A change in materials, presence or absence of a washer, type of lubrication used (if any) and especially cleanliness will drastically change torque requirements. For example, adding copper based never-seize requires a correction factor of 0.55. Ever adjust torque values?

According to Machinery’s Handbook a “calibrated arm” is good for +/- 35% and a torque wrench only good for +/- 25%. Add a little rust, a different washer and a little lube…The torque value shown on your $1000 super-wham-a-dyner torque wrench has little to do with the desired clamping force that the torque spec was calculated to attain.

Ignore everything else and a $5 pawn shop torque wrench is no better or worse than anything else.

Before anyone gets mad, look into it. Getting to the proper clamping force is much more complicated than reading a torque value.

Motomandan, I was a nuke too…if I remember right, QA dictated ever little thing down to the washers, lubes, torque specs…But I could be wrong, it’s been a long time.

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I know this won’t be popular with guys that spent a lot of $$ on torque wrenches (this caused a lot of disagreement in our shop) but…unless you are carefully controlling a lot of other factors it makes absolutely no difference which wrench you use.

Bolt torque is an INDIRECT measure of bolt tension and ultimately clamping force. A change in materials, presence or absence of a washer, type of lubrication used (if any) and especially cleanliness will drastically change torque requirements. For example, adding copper based never-seize requires a correction factor of 0.55. Ever adjust torque values?

According to Machinery’s Handbook a “calibrated arm” is good for +/- 35% and a torque wrench only good for +/- 25%. Add a little rust, a different washer and a little lube…The torque value shown on your $1000 super-wham-a-dyner torque wrench has little to do with the desired clamping force that the torque spec was calculated to attain.

Great points here to consider. Assuming one adjusts torque values, a good torque wrench is still needed.

I don't reach for my torque wrench on some applications, such as the oil drain bolt, because I don't trust myself to properly adjust torque values. Instead, I tighten the bolt and rely on the safety wire.

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