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Stupid mechanics...

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Well, today I was talking to my mechanic friend.. Apparently, he finally found out the mystery problem with the little KTM50 they've spent FOREVER trying to get to run..

So heres the situation.. A guy puts a new top-end in for his son, and it doesn't start.. Double checks everything, and can't figure it out.. Everything was perfect.. So he takes it to the KTM shop.. They get it, trouble shoot it, and not sure what to do, they replaced it with a brand new OEM carburetor..

No luck... Not the carburetor..

Not knowing what to do, they replaced the ignition.. Still no luck.. Once again, they completely tear it down and check absolutely EVERYTHING.. Still, they find no problem whatsoever.. So, the dealer admits they can't find anything wrong with it.. They give it back to him, no charge.. Now, the dad took it to my friend mechanic..

He has it for 10 minutes, when he found out they PUT THE WRONG PISTON IN!! The piston they put in was for a new-style (with reeds) KTM50.. But the piston the dad put in was for a old-school KTM50 (without reeds)...

:thumbsup::ride::applause: Wow.. I can't believe the KTM dealer didn't realize it.. Just shocking..

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I dont usually take my bike to the dealer, i have a couple times, but havent had anything like that happen though.

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I dont usually take my bike to the dealer, i have a couple times, but havent had anything like that happen though.

Yeah, I know what ya mean. A couple weeks ago a guy put straight gas in my friends YZ 125. It burned up the piston, cylinder and the crank bearing. They tore it down and when they put it back together and when they pressed the bearing on to the crank sleeve they must have screwed it up and it lasted about 3 minutes and locked up again. At least he was honest about it he said it didn't feel right when he pressed it in but he went on and put it together anyway. Sometimes I wonder if these guys even care about what they are doing.

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LOL! since when don't 2 strokes have reeds?
Two-strokes did not always have reed induction, many older two-strokes used what is known as a piston-port design, where the piston was the only thing that controlled the intake tract opening. Weed whackers and chainsaws still don't have reeds for the most part.

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So, the guy you know puts in a new piston, then takes it to the dealer because it doesn't work? Turns out to be the wrong piston and that is the dealer's fault? Not saying the dealer shouldn't have figured that out, especially if they tore it down. But if one person didn't notice it was the wrong piston, it isn't hard to believe another one wouldn't.

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So, the guy you know puts in a new piston, then takes it to the dealer because it doesn't work? Turns out to be the wrong piston and that is the dealer's fault? Not saying the dealer shouldn't have figured that out, especially if they tore it down. But if one person didn't notice it was the wrong piston, it isn't hard to believe another one wouldn't.

It's just bad problem solving all around. If the bike ran before a new top end was replaced but not after the most logical solution is there is an issue with the parts or install of the top end. So the very first step would be to find out what top end was put in and get the part number to verify.

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A backyard mechanic making that mistake is almost understandable. Not great, but understandable. He's not a "certified KTM tech" or whatever the dealer claims to be.

The dealer, being "certified" in KTMs or whatever, should have checked for that and known it could be an issue. Instead it seems like they were typical of dealerships and didn't know and then didn't bother to cross reference and check it.

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It's all on the dad. Didn't he see the difference in pistons? Did he take the old piston into the shop when he ordered/bought the new one? Maybe he should have taken it to the dealer in the first place.

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It's all on the dad. Didn't he see the difference in pistons?

Isn't it assumed the initial problem was caused by the dad? I believe the point of the post was the mechanic used bad troubleshooting which resulted in unneeded expenditures and time. I you bring in a $2000 laptop to a shop to repair and that place has you replace 3 parts before finding the actual problem...most would assume there was a lack of proper troubleshooting involved.

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Two-strokes did not always have reed induction, many older two-strokes used what is known as a piston-port design,
and there were rotary-valved ones too, which allowed the the same kind of control of intake timing you get with cams on a 4s. As far as I know, it's the long intake port that was the problem; it was simple and not heavy.

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and there were rotary-valved ones too, which allowed the the same kind of control of intake timing you get with cams on a 4s. As far as I know, it's the long intake port that was the problem; it was simple and not heavy.
The biggest problem was excess engine width.

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The dealership technician does not have a crystal ball to know the wrong piston was put in.

The poor guy spent all that time on it and did not get paid.

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The dealership technician does not have a crystal ball to know the wrong piston was put in.

If I came to you and said "Hey I have this 2t that worked fine but needed a new top end so I put one in. Now it won't start up anymore." Tell me the first few things you'd look at to solve the problem. I'd hope a new carb would be far down on that list.

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