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If you had 500$

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Ok, ive decided to keep my XR after a long thought to sell it for a 300EXC.

So im going to put some aftermarket bits on it to keep it goin strong.

heres what ive got:

Stage 1 hotcam, Is this best for mid, top end power??

Wider footpegs

Anodised Chain Guide

New Bars

Braded Front Brake line

What stage hotcam is the best for more mid/top power.??

thanks

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Scrap the hotcam and the chain guide and put the money towards a Mikuni Pumper. Your machine will feel like a new bike, and you won't have to mess with the indestructible valve train of the stock xr400.

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TwistiT,

I have got a Mikuni TM36-68 pumper carb this june for my 2001 xr4 and quite agree with Kevin.

That is awesome! :thumbsup::ride::applause:

You should get one if you have not got it yet. :applause:

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Well, ive done the suspension for my weight and so far all i want is more power.

Whats the cheapest the pumpers come???

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For sure don't change the stock chain guide, the stockers rule.

Wide pegs, absolutely.

Top Applied triple clamp (unless you're under 5'5") makes far nicer ergos.

Fat bars.

Dampner.

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I bought my bike with the pumper (I rode it when it was stock, but I had a KLR250 at the time so it felt fast as hell), so I really can't compare it to how the bike was with the stock carb. But if things are as bad as people say they are with the stock carb, I'd say a pumper is worth it.

For example, this morning I started my bike at about 5:40 in the morning (going to work, truck is in the body shop). Temp was 52*, fired on the second kick, then I realized my idle was a little low, turned it up just a little, and started on the next kick. And that's really the first time I can remember it taking more than 2 kicks to get it started (except for the time when I forgot to put the fuel line back on the petcock, D'OH!)

Also, when I whack the throttle I never get any hesitation, period. If I hadn't found this forum, and bought the bike the way it is, I wouldn't have even known these bikes had a hesitation when you crack the throttle.

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Get the carb! short of the suspension best thing you can do..

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Dampner is a great way to go. Night and day I found. Best $500 I spent so far.

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ditto on the applied clamp and fat bars along with the pumper. If you have anything left over get the IMS pro series pegs.

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I would keep the $500, put it in a savings account, get a job, work, and keep putting money away into that account, and then when you have enough money in the bank you can sell the XR and use ALL the money to buy a much newer, better-suspended, faster KTM.

This way you can continue to enjoy the XR for what it is and still be working towards something better.

I love my XR, and I might not ever sell it. I've also sunk a lot of money into it and upgraded the suspension, ergos, motor, etc. and I have no regrets.

However, at some point you have to stop sinking money into an old design and just ride it and enjoy it for what it is, and start putting your money towards a machine that has all the modern advancements on it.

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I would keep the $500, put it in a savings account, get a job, work, and keep putting money away into that account, and then when you have enough money in the bank you can sell the XR and use ALL the money to buy a much newer, better-suspended, faster KTM.

This way you can continue to enjoy the XR for what it is and still be working towards something better.

I love my XR, and I might not ever sell it. I've also sunk a lot of money into it and upgraded the suspension, ergos, motor, etc. and I have no regrets.

However, at some point you have to stop sinking money into an old design and just ride it and enjoy it for what it is, and start putting your money towards a machine that has all the modern advancements on it.

That is very good advice. I have an 02 with Race Tech suspension, Scotts Damper and Triple Clamp, IMS 4gal tank, and just put on the Mikuni (That made a big difference). Then this weekend my brother wanted to ride the XR so we switched bikes and that was a big mistake. So I rode his 06 KX450F for 15 min and WOW now all I can think about is a new KTM EXC or a CRF X. (I am going to wait until the have fuel injection before I go shopping for a new bike)

So now I am done spending big money upgrading the XR unless I can remove it and put it on a new bike like the Scotts Damper, Cycra Hand Guards, Baja Designs 100W 8" light (That's next)

I am not going to neglect the XR or ever sell her. She will always get the royal treatment that she deserves.

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I would keep the $500, put it in a savings account, get a job, work, and keep putting money away into that account, and then when you have enough money in the bank you can sell the XR and use ALL the money to buy a much newer, better-suspended, faster KTM.

It is not the speed of the bike it is the skill of the rider.

I love my XR, and I might not ever sell it. I've also sunk a lot of money into it and upgraded the suspension, ergos, motor, etc. and I have no regrets.

This contradicts the above statement urging the selling of the XR after saving 8-10 times the amount in question.

However, at some point you have to stop sinking money into an old design and just ride it and enjoy it for what it is, and start putting your money towards a machine that has all the modern advancements on it.

If that is what you want or there is a career in it for you, every year the modern advancements change,and my question is where will this cycle end? Do you sell and upgrade everytime the technology changes? I would say find what you like and ride it,or compete with it, or wrench on it, or whatever it is that makes you happy. I'm at a point in my life where I could ride any motorcycle I want to but due to the fact that the "old design" fits my intended use and riding style the XR is my choice. I've had water cooled 4-strokes that require engine dis-assembly to adjust the valves and that technology does not impress me. The easy to maintain or low maintenance machines are going away giving way to a new higher cost, higher revving, higher maintenance modern technology. No offense intended just my opinion.

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I just rode a course on my XR4 that really highlighted the advantages of more modern bikes. Granted, the XR is set-up for long distance desert sledding, not the nasty rutted, steep, rocky, rooted single track terrain I had to ride on. I made it around the course and felt good in some of the sections but the single track stuff and mud really cooked my goose. Most of the riders were on smaller, much lighter bikes set-up for lower speeds and much more technical riding. This was my first exposure to WORCS type Hare Scramble courses and it was a real eye opener. Guys were laughing at the old XR4 with the 4 gallon desert tank jetted for sea level at 7500 feet. I'm thinking about things right now and learned that this type of riding and the XR4 is like bringing a knife to a gun fight. If I had some idea of what to expect as I was preparing for the trip I would have geared way down from the 15/41 to something like a 14/47, put the stock tank back on, and probably picked different tires...On the bright side, the pumper did great with just a 3/4 turn of the fuel screw up to about 10,000 feet. Bike ran great. Had two flats, cracked the frame where the left foot peg mount is welded to it, broke the front brake perch, bent the lever to non-functioning position (which was OK since all the fluid leaked out). Did all this the day before the race in 6 crashes and 6 1/2 hours of hard riding school. Could not ride the event because I could not get repairs done in time and the old, worn, tired, bruised ego and body would not let me. XR did better overall than her rider:) Am I selling the XR? NOT A CHANCE. Am I looking for another bike? You bet. Am I going to prepare and practice in a whole different way? Absolutely. It is still 90% rider and 10% bike IME but the more modern bikes are exactly that. Courses are set-up to challenge them which is an extra challenge for the old school XR's. It can be still done on the XR I believe. I wonder what these guys would have thought about their bikes down here in Yuma in the wide open desert for a 100 miler? My bike does that a few times every month and never complains.

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It is not the speed of the bike it is the skill of the rider..
Very true.
This contradicts the above statement urging the selling of the XR after saving 8-10 times the amount in question.
No, it doesn't contradict anything. The XR is great for what it is -- a heavy, kick-started, under-suspended pig with lots of reliability and lots of low-end grunt and torque. It's great for a casual trail rider, which is exactly what I am.

On the other hand, how many XR-400's did you see cross the finish line at Last Man Standing, or Erzburg, or any GNCC or world class event?

I'm not disparaging the XR. It's great for what it is. I'm happy with mine, even though I'm looking at KTM's this year. I'll probably keep my XR no matter what.

If that is what you want or there is a career in it for you, every year the modern advancements change,and my question is where will this cycle end? Do you sell and upgrade everytime the technology changes? I would say find what you like and ride it,or compete with it, or wrench on it, or whatever it is that makes you happy. I'm at a point in my life where I could ride any motorcycle I want to but due to the fact that the "old design" fits my intended use and riding style the XR is my choice. I've had water cooled 4-strokes that require engine dis-assembly to adjust the valves and that technology does not impress me. The easy to maintain or low maintenance machines are going away giving way to a new higher cost, higher revving, higher maintenance modern technology. No offense intended just my opinion.
I agree with you. I'm not into wrenching, just riding when I feel like it, no hassles. I may buy a KTM and decide it's not for me, due to the frequent oil changes, valve adjustments, and whatever else they require. But I'm like a lot of guys who've bought an XR... We've had it for a few years (6 years for me), we've put a couple thousand dollars into it ,and we ride it pretty hard and we've tried our friend's newer bikes and they're pretty nice. Really nice. Electric start. Light weight. Really plush suspension right out the door...

I'll keep the XR because she has a special place in my heart, but I'm just ready to try something different and new is all...

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I recently bought a CRF250X to go along with the XR400 I have. The CRF is for going faster when you know where you want to go and want to stand up most of the time. the XR I use for exploring trails and when I plan a long day in the saddle. NOTHING is as comfortable on an all day ride as my XR400.

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On the other hand, how many XR-400's did you see cross the finish line at Last Man Standing, or Erzburg, or any GNCC or world class event?

HEY! i was planning on running my 250 at the unidilla GNCC (250 c-class) on my 6 mounth annaversary with my girlfriend. My rents say i don't ride enough and shouldn't race, so i can't... Will probably be out there helping the TT team. But I'll bet i'd make it over the line... Atleast that would of been my objective.

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