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Steering dampener ...or not

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I have heard mixed things about stering dampeners if you ride tight trails. I am not doing flat out desert riding and am wondering what this would provide me in heavily wooded trails. Does it slow your turning ability in tight spots? Thanks fr any help.

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I have heard mixed things about stering dampeners if you ride tight trails. I am not doing flat out desert riding and am wondering what this would provide me in heavily wooded trails. Does it slow your turning ability in tight spots? Thanks fr any help.

no it wouldnt slow your turning in tight spots, you can adjust you damper according to what you are riding, crank it up for the deep sand or such, and tone it down for the tight woods.

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I ride with a Scotts Performance stabilizer. When in sand I crank it up and for tight trails I release the tension. Sometimes on tight trails with ruts you still need to crank it up a little to keep from over steering into the ruts. The front wheel bounce sometimes throws you where you don't want to go riding in the rocks the stabilizer will help you there too because you tend to over steer and get out of control.

For inexperienced and older riders a stablizer is a real bonus. I'm 62 and have had a quadruple by-pass. I have lost a lot of upper body strength because they cut your chest muscles down the middle in surgery. Even after working

out with bench presses I still can't get back to where I was in upper body strength. I like the my stabilizer and my Rekluze z-start clutch. They make it so I can keep up with the pros. You have to learn to adjust it on the fly because of terrain changes. So I have labeled the settings with stick ons to make it easier. You may want to stop to adjust it sometimes though. :thumbsup:

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Thanks for the feedback.....if I can set the tension so to where it feels like there is no resistance that would be cool. I just rode up in the Lake Tahoe area and the were some rocks which made me think twice about not having one.

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You need to understand how (at least a Scott's) stabilizer works. The hydraulic valving inside is much like a good shock absorber. There are multiple stages of valving. The primary valving is that which is commonly adjusted on the fly (the big knob). You can feel this change sitting on the bike just by turning it back and forth. This is the valving that when cranked down makes running a sand wash at high speed such a pleasure. You would leave this looser for the woods thing.

It is the secondary or high speed valving that makes the magic. In split seconds when you are deflected off of rocks, ruts or roots, this valving temporarily "locks up" and keeps you from hitting the ground. This feeling is transparent but trust me, woods or desert, it works.

I have said it before and I'll say it again........once you ride with one you never will without one again! Yes a GPR is cheaper but it is not the same.

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Makes a huge difference no matter which type of riding I do. I noticed an immediate difference on high speed - you don't get the high-speed shakes.

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I have the Scott's and it it has saved me from going over at least once or twice. I would recommend it, but only after having your suspension redone, epically if your outside the bikes recommended weight. I believe the x is set up for a 185 lb rider, being 145 having it re sprung made a big difference, having it re sprung and re valved made a huge difference. Much more than the Scott's damper.

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