Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Got a Small Dualsport Bike.

Recommended Posts

To all my new DualSport buddies on the "Bike or Rider" thread below, I broke down and bought a small and light dualsport bike as we discussed. It's also Vintage. Drove it all around the neighborhood and backroads of my town yesterday. Had an absolute blast.

Some details on the bike: 1976 Suzuki TS185. Two Stroke dualsport bike with tag/title. Weight 218. Seat height - low (looks like a mini bike sitting next to my WR400). The power curve is smooth and linear.

Photo: http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m262/Mikem_09/1916a7d7.jpg

Now I pray that when I break something, I can find the parts. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is that a current pic ? That thing looks brand new. How much did you pay,if I could ask ? :thumbsup:

Wow! Is that your bike in the pic? Nice!

I may have to rethink my plans and look for a vintage DS/trials hybrid bike like that.

Keep us posted on how it meets/exceeds the goals expressed earlier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a TS185 and my wife still has a TS100, They are great bikes. Hers looks like it just came off the show room floor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys:

That is exactly what my wife needs too, except in a 4 stroke config.

I think I have talked her into buying a bike in the new year to go along with mine. She needs something small to learn on as she is 100lbs soaking wet!!!

Willys

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that looks like a nice machine -- hows the gearing for street use? Was it restored, or just super-low hours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi guys:

That is exactly what my wife needs too, except in a 4 stroke config.

I think I have talked her into buying a bike in the new year to go along with mine. She needs something small to learn on as she is 100lbs soaking wet!!!

Willys

Doesn't Kawasaki still sell the Super Sherpa (KL250) in Canada? My wife has one and it is a fantastic bike, even for an experienced rider.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll try to answer all the questions. The pic is current. I bought it from a collector. I'm fairly new to this vintage stuff, but this is what I gather: The bike is in (the collector's term) excellent original condition with 1,500 miles. It's considered a nice "rider" - A bike that is not really nice enough to put in a show, but, still in very good condition. A bike that is meant to be ridden. The "show" bikes, on the other hand, look brand new or almost brand new and are rarely ridden, because of their value.

I paid $1400 for it, which seems to be in the range (somewhere around 1200 - 2000) for vintage japanese two stroke enduro bikes, which are nice "riders". My only concern is a light very film of rust in the tank in spots. I hear this is very typical, even for nice bikes this age. It has a fuel filter and I've been reading the forum on how to deal with this if it becomes a problem.

It runs sweet. It's pretty quiet for a two stroke - lot of muffler. Didn't smoke anymore than a modern, well tuned 2-stroke. Gearing seemed right for the local roads. Cruised along relaxed in the 45- 50mph range with room to spare, but didn't want to push it until I have ridden it for a while.

I plan to use this one exploring and taking it easy - mainly on mountain dirtroads, backroads and some easier trails. I'm coming back from an injury and I think my desire not to drop this bike and mess it up, will help keep my throttle hand in check.

Let us know if any of you are thinking of doing something similar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice ride. I've had a couple of 2 stroke dual sports (a Hodaka and a Bultaco Alpina) but now I'm on a Kaw Super Sherpa. Wouldn't mind another 2 stroke in the 175-185cc range if I could find one as nice as yours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe you are going to start a new trend: vintage dual sports! I always loved the 70s dual sports. A guy in my neighborhood had a '75 kawasaki KE 250. It was the coolest thing around back in the day. Suzuki had the coolest dual sports though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool.I just today bought a cycle trader and saw the bike you just bought for sale .I had thought of calling the guy .I recognized the bike as soon as I saw the picture .I had a 1978 that was yellow.LOVED that bike.Small world.These are the bikes I grew up on.Every body back then had duel purpose bikes(thats what they were called back then) .on. :thumbsup::ride::applause::applause::applause::applause:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll try to put more pics on here. The last one was the for sale pic. I have to wait on my daughter who is the only one with a digital camera.

Switching topics just a little. Riding this vintage bike has me thinking. I'm not sure I want to take it 50 miles from nowhere in the mountains (It's thirty years old). But, what it's shown me is I love the light weight and the particular kind of smooth two stroke power it produces, I don't particularly care for the feel of a modern two strokes I've ridden - KTM 200, for instance. Too pipey and too much vibration. This vintage bike doesn't vibrate anymore than my 4 strokes.

Can anyone comment on why the smooth power in the old dualsport. A friend mentioned something about counterbalancers. I wonder if you can get these on any modern or near modern two strokes.

Here is a thread I found on two stroke dual sport bikes on Adventure rider:

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=153845&highlight=2stroke

In the spirit of pushing to limits of small and lightness. Here is a dual sport 50 cc, Yamaha sells in Europe that supposedly will go 60mph. I just think that is very cool. Almost a mountain bike with a motor.

http://www.yamaha-motor-europe.com/products/scooters/50cc_Gearbox/dt50r.jsp?view=gallery

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Too pipey and too much vibration. This vintage bike doesn't vibrate anymore than my 4 strokes.

Can anyone comment on why the smooth power in the old dualsport. A friend mentioned something about counterbalancers. I wonder if you can get these on any modern or near modern two strokes.

Here's my take.

Back when I started riding (late 1960s), most bikes were not very specialized because they served several roles. For example, a Triumph 650 was a cruiser, touring bike, cafe racer, commuter, dirt tracker and - with upswept pipes and skid plate - an enduro bike.

Since then, bikes have become more and more specialized and narrowly focused. As bikes become more narrowly focused, they get better at one thing BUT much worse at everything else. Losing a counterbalancer leads to vibes but saves weight, a reasonable trade-off for an MX bike.

So now, you have to have a different bike for every role. Peter Egan wrote that it now takes 5 bikes to meet a rider's needs. It's all part of a government/industry conspiracy to make us consume more stuff and pay more taxes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's my take.

Back when I started riding (late 1960s), most bikes were not very specialized because they served several roles. For example, a Triumph 650 was a cruiser, touring bike, cafe racer, commuter, dirt tracker and - with upswept pipes and skid plate - an enduro bike.

Since then, bikes have become more and more specialized and narrowly focused. As bikes become more narrowly focused, they get better at one thing BUT much worse at everything else. Losing a counterbalancer leads to vibes but saves weight, a reasonable trade-off for an MX bike.

So now, you have to have a different bike for every role. Peter Egan wrote that it now takes 5 bikes to meet a rider's needs. It's all part of a government/industry conspiracy to make us consume more stuff and pay more taxes.

I agree with you 100% my dad and I, when I was about 10 went to Cannan valley WV on old 69 honda trail 90 with two shotguns on the side to go grouse hunting.

Remember Blackwater 100 the same place.

Probably a 250 mile round trip.

All bikes were dual sport back then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the spirit of pushing to limits of small and lightness. Here is a dual sport 50 cc, Yamaha sells in Europe that supposedly will go 60mph. I just think that is very cool. Almost a mountain bike with a motor.

http://www.yamaha-motor-europe.com/products/scooters/50cc_Gearbox/dt50r.jsp?view=gallery

Wow, that little bike looks really fun, especially for us light-weights. Would it be impossible to import one of those to the states? I know it couldn't get a plate here in CA, but maybe it would be legal in some of the more reasonable states?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I had said earlier I had one of those bikes.I grew up on bikes like that and as I got older I got into motocross.It was not until the past year that I did get back into dual sport bikes.I have a DRZ now and I must say I wish there was more of a choice out there .I know the 2 :thumbsup: strokes are out because of the emissions but those old small 2 stroke dual purpose bikes were great. Very low state of tune so they would last forever and if something did go wrong they were cheap and easy to work on. My DRZ is fun but VERY heavy.I kinda like the Gas Gas Pampera.It is street legal and a 2 stroke.It is 280 cc and has a very low seat height becaust it is based on the frame from the trials bike.this is about as close as I think there is today to your bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few additional thoughts:

One, I've read bits and pieces about two stroke technology possibly making a comeback based on some kind of clean burniing technology. The weight to power issues, price of manufacture to power ratio and the simplicity of motor issues is part of what is driving this. Plus they still sell them all over the world.

Two, A guy (Yamaha dealer) told me a while back that he had a DT50 and it was a cool little dual sport bike. I never saw it. I wonder if there is a way to import some of these to the States? There are also 125's in this category. I think all or most of the major manufacturers sell these overseas in various countries.

1976 TS 185 report - rode it yesterday again - running very well. Cranks on first or second kick. but hearing some kind of funny distinct noise around the chain area while off the gas but still rolling, kind of a cyclical waan waan waan waan sound, almost like something is off balance. Chain looks well lubed - any ideas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×