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Just picked up my new Pitster at WMR

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I'm new to the pit bike forum, have been riding and posting on the big bike forums for a while now but just picked up a new Pitster Pro X2R from my local dealer here in Florida WMR Competition Performance.

This thing is sick! Can't wait for the new track to open at Morosso Motor sports park so I can start practicing on the pit bike track.

I have had Honda 50's for ever but this new pit bike is so much better than my little CR50 even with a big bore kit and thousands of dollars in after market add ons. The guys at WMR are really getting into the pit bike thing, they have an awesome big bore mod motor in a demo bike that is awesome, it has a huge cam, is ported with a set of their Conical valve springs with Ti retainers and more, the thing would come up in every gear without even trying, think I will be getting that mod done soon to mine, got to have the fastest bike at the track after all.

They just got in their first Moto Vert in too, Marzocchi forks, Pro Taper bars and a bunch of billet parts plus an awesome aluminum frame, I wanted to buy it but they wanted to keep it for a while until more arrived, lot's of the parts look exactly like a Pitster but some are definitely upgraded, looks like the best bike available off the shelf, the forks alone are reason enough to get one :thumbsup:

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You ride it easy for an hour, and your guaranteed to have the slowest POS at the track. Do it like this:

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

That's the biggest bunch of BS I've ever seen. More power on the track? Yeah right man. I've stood right next to a brand new bike as someone started the puppy up, tried out your technique, and cold seized the engine. IMHO that page was designed for fun to see how many guys would actually listen to him and then seize up their engines.

I grew up having a motorcycle mechanic as a Dad. I gotta see a lot of break ins. That is NOT how you do it.

Back to the subject on hand though. Have fun on the bike. Give us a honest review after a few rides on it and let us know what you think! :thumbsup:

(add) OMW... I read over that site for awhile. Mototune... is messed up. I guess if you're Motoman you put in smaller valves, weld in your intakes, break in your bike full throttle, see aliens in the night sky, get hit by lightning 9 times, and drop you false teeth down a womans shirt. Wow... it's almost like the national enquirer, only better! hahahahahaha

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It does seem odd that most manufacturer break in is different than that on the link,I'll listen to the builder over some guy on the internet.

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That's the biggest bunch of BS I've ever seen. More power on the track? Yeah right man. I've stood right next to a brand new bike as someone started the puppy up, tried out your technique, and cold seized the engine. IMHO that page was designed for fun to see how many guys would actually listen to him and then seize up their engines.

I grew up having a motorcycle mechanic as a Dad. I gotta see a lot of break ins. That is NOT how you do it.

Back to the subject on hand though. Have fun on the bike. Give us a honest review after a few rides on it and let us know what you think! :thumbsup:

(add) OMW... I read over that site for awhile. Mototune... is messed up. I guess if you're Motoman you put in smaller valves, weld in your intakes, break in your bike full throttle, see aliens in the night sky, get hit by lightning 9 times, and drop you false teeth down a womans shirt. Wow... it's almost like the national enquirer, only better! hahahahahaha

Would you listen to the engine builder that built the motor for Henry Wiles, the guys thats won the last 3 or 4 Peoria TT's in a row?

There is logic to why you would want to break the motor in hard. It has to do with Ring flutter and ring seating. The piston ring is really the only part that needs to be broken in if everything else is right.

You need to use some common sense when you break in a motor using this technique. What you dont want to do is over-load the ring right out of the gate. Its also for fourstrokes only. If you try to break in a two stroke like this you are almost guaranteed to have a problem.

There are also some assembly tips that will yield a lot of power (and they arent new by any stretch, just completely different than any manufacturer spec). But I dont think you guys are open to that...

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I've talked to some local mechanics, and they all said the idea is crazy. I know some national level mechanics and I'll ask them this week what they think, and maybe post what they say...

BTW, I'm no mechanic. Just a mechanic groupie... lol.

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Well, I'll try to explain why it works.

When you break the motor in hard (hard is a relative term too) what youre trying to do is get the top ring to seat ASAP. Youve only got about 15 minutes of run time to get the top ring seated properly, or optimumly (if thats even a word). The reason its so important to get the ring sealed is to 1. to keep the oil out of the comustion chamber and 2. the compression in the chamber. The top ring is the sealer, the second ring is an oil scraper and the third is to drain oil back away from the skirt to the pin to prevent too much oil from damming up behind the ring with no where to go.

Now, the reason you want to break the motor in relatively hard is to use the compression from the engine to force the ring into the bore wall to seat it ASAP. The reason you dont want to hold a steady speed is so that the ring doesnt flutter in the ring land during break in. The ring land needs a little work hardening. When they say break the motor in hard..that doesnt mean go out and run the thing on the rev limiter, what it means is roll on the trottle to about 3/4's of the total limit then back off...roll it back on again...back it off do that in about 3rd gear so it pulls nice and hard, but not too hard..etc..bout 15 minutes worth. Go race. If you try that with a two stroke it probably will cold seize.

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Okay, I'm convinced now. I told the head mechanic at one of the local race shops about this break in procedure and asked if that's the proper way to do it. He looked at me and said that dumb of a question shouldn't even warrant an answer. Some of his quotes were "is that guy on crack?" "only a moron would do that" and "that guy's full of $#@!".

Like I thought...

I'm not even gonna talk about cars, I don't know jack squat about cars, but on bikes breaking them in like that is just plain stupid. You gotta heat cycle them before you even ride them, change the oil, and then take it easy for about 1/2 hour to an hour, then change the oil again, and then go ahead and ride it like you stole it.

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Okay, I'm convinced now. I told the head mechanic at one of the local race shops about this break in procedure and asked if that's the proper way to do it. He looked at me and said that dumb of a question shouldn't even warrant an answer. Some of his quotes were "is that guy on crack?" "only a moron would do that" and "that guy's full of $#@!".

Like I thought...

I'm not even gonna talk about cars, I don't know jack squat about cars, but on bikes breaking them in like that is just plain stupid. You gotta heat cycle them before you even ride them, change the oil, and then take it easy for about 1/2 hour to an hour, then change the oil again, and then go ahead and ride it like you stole it.

:thumbsup:

1. You dont have to heat cycle a forged piston.

2.. I bet his motors burn oil.

Feel free to do it the way you always have. There's not anything wrong with it, but there is a better way. By the way, the hard break in has been in use since the early 60's.

If your running an iron ring, the hard break in isnt that critical, but if your running a hard chrome, or Moly rings...its imparitive. The cross hatch in the cylinder, especially in an iron bore isnt hard enough to cut the ring and you end up with an oil burner.

Cast stock style pistons need heat cycled for sure. When you start asking questions about break in and assembly technique you need to ask people with broader experience. Its a big world out there...

Calling someone a moron based on what they may do or not do without first hand experience of what theyre doing is ignorant and short sighted.

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I am talking MOTORCYCLES!

Seat the rings? Seating them hard like that risks seizing the engine. The guy I mentioned earlier was a factory crew chief for several years, worked with an exhaust company for many, many years, and now is engine builder for a national supermoto team, plus probably 4-5 national motocross riders. I've spent some time in his shop and will now believe anything he tells me about engines.

And I will continue to call the mototuneusa guy a moron. I can give guys on here a break, but he's a moron. He should've stuck to UFO sightings. lol.

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Thanks for all the advice people, I always break my bikes in the same way, I run them easy for the first five minutes then go at it pretty hard without getting it too hot. You need to be sensible but there is some truth to breaking it in like a dog and having it run like a dog.

So far it's awesome, no problems and tons of fun!

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I'm an ex two smoker and I do use some of mototunes methods.

I usually Heat the engine, make sure its up to temp or you will cold seize it.

Do a 15 min session at 1/2 throttle. Riding off and on throttle with braking, normal riding. cool a bit check oil, etc.

Do a 15 min 3/4 throttle session.

then full throttle.

Change the oil. Do another riding session with WOT.

CHange the oil again.

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