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Chain Gummed Up... HELP

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the chain still works fine and it is only to last me until winter when I change it along with new countershaft/rear sprockets...

but I went riding in some mud and then got a flat later in the day.. so the bike has been sitting and the chain isnt looking the best right now.. all of the links are caked... i want to take it off and clean it good before I go riding again, but what chemicals are ok to use on it? I was thinking of soaking the whole chain in a bucket of some lubrication.. oil or whatever else, but I just want to clean up the links. Is it time to get out the colgate and toothbrush? :thumbsup:

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Scrub it with some soap, water and a scrub brush real well, then give it a good soaking with WD40 to displace the water. You could then soak it down with your favorite chain lube. If it rusted up a little give it a good soaking of lube as you put it inside of a ziplock bag and let it soak in there a few days.

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I usually clean my chains by letting them sit in a container to gunk. Seems to eat away all of the caked on stuff.

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Unlike Rockjockey, I would not get WD40 anywhere near my chain, not even if you offered me a night out with a gaggle of Playboy bunnies.

Plain old kerosene is fine, just be very gentle with the brush so as not to damage the o-rings.

d.

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Unlike Rockjockey, I would not get WD40 anywhere near my chain, not even if you offered me a night out with a gaggle of Playboy bunnies.

I've got to ask, why?

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I clean ours after washing with a "Grunge Brush" from the cycle shop, and then spray down good with WD40 also and 2 years later, they still look and pivot like new

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I've got to ask, why?
I'm only guessing cuz WD40 doesnt really lubricate.. it removes moisture.. maybe spraying that could get to the O rings after awhile? Just a guess.. I'm a chain n00b :ride:

appreciate the advice fellas.. Now if I could only get the damn master link off the factory chain :thumbsup:

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Do a search here on chain maintenance and you will find alot of people use only WD40 on their chains. They claim all the lube the chain will ever need is trapped beneath the O-rings. The idea is to displace the moisture that causes the damage (rust). I have used it after every ride for years and have never experienced any O-ring damage.

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I douche my chain with WD after every wash. I put a rag in my hand and grip the chain with it then spin the wheel around to wipe everything off. Cleans the chain great, inhibits surface rust, and has never been a problem with O-rings. I then cake the chain with a high quality waxy chain lube. I use the WD for water displacement and cleaning not for lubrication although I think it does work a little for lubrication also. JM02.

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Well, I'm no lubrication expert, far from it. But I do think that WD40 is a penetrant, and also it will dissolve what grease it encounters. If it passes the o-rings, then it might dissolve the grease behind them.

This idea is mostly based on this article:

http://www.webbikeworld.com/t2/motorcycle-chain-lube/

Read down to the bit on ball bearings and WD40.

d.

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Well, I'm no lubrication expert, far from it. But I do think that WD40 is a penetrant, and also it will dissolve what grease it encounters. If it passes the o-rings, then it might dissolve the grease behind them.

This idea is mostly based on this article:

http://www.webbikeworld.com/t2/motorcycle-chain-lube/

Read down to the bit on ball bearings and WD40.

d.

Yup, I think that's right. I still use the WD. Have to replace chains every year (usually) anyway.

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Usually after a ride I give my bike a good wash, put it up on the stand, use wd40 to displace the water, use a rag to wipe it down, let the WD evaporate then use some 90w gear oil.

Never had a problem with my chains.

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Usually after a ride I give my bike a good wash, put it up on the stand, use wd40 to displace the water, use a rag to wipe it down, let the WD evaporate then use some 90w gear oil.
I pretty much do the same thing, except I use Tri-Flow after the WD-40. My original stock chain lasted 3 years, and I examined it pretty closely after I took it off and all the o-rings were in good shape. I had to adjust the slack twice in 3 years. In fact, I think it still had lots of life left, but I was replacing the counter-shaft and rear sprockets, and everybody says you should replace the chain too whenever you do that, so I did...

WD-40 won't hurt your chain if you use it to displace water after washing. But afterwards, you should use a real lubricant for lubrication.

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Maybe I'm just cheap, but after washing the bike/chain I use compressed air to blow the excess water off of the chain. I doubt WD40 would really hurt the chain that much (as often as I ride/clean it, that is) but I like knowing that the water is OFF the chain and not just DISPLACED somewhere else.

I might add it's best to not put the compressed air directly into the o-ring areas, but across the top to get the water out. I'm sure there's probably a huge thread on the dangers of using air to dry a chain out there somewhere!!

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