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Te450 Motor Reliable?

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I can not make up my mind between WR450 or the TE450. How reliable are the Husky motors?

currently have DRZ400E but would like some thing different this time round.

Thanks

Paul

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05 and up are VERY reliable. 04's unfortunately had valve issues. The TE450 is an awesome bike.

K

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Early 2004s are the ones to avoid (The ones with the separate decompressor lever on the bars) Ride: Where was your decompressor mounted? I noticed you have upgraded your valves/springs... How many miles do you have on that head work?

Thanks,

Gavin

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My 05' TE510 so far has proven to be very reliable. I like it!

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Last month, I rode with a guy on a brand new 2006 TE510. I think it was his third time out and he had about 100 miles on the bike. It died way out on the trail. He was there for a couple hours trying to get the bike started. It had some type of electrical short under the tank. It was a really bad day for him. I know him from another forum where he is now trying to sell the bike.

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I've had my 06 Te450 going on almost a year and the bike has been awesome. Had it out in Moab for an entire week of riding this past July and the bike ran and performed perfectly and I can't recall anyone on here say anything about a bad motor on an '06 or an '05 for that matter.

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Someone wiser than me once said that "data is the plural of anecdote" and anecdotes are what you get in reply to a question like this. They mean something collectively, but almost zippo on their own. Do a search in the Husky forum and you won't find threads with titles like "My TE tranny melted down!" or "06 TE top end blown at 1,000 miles!". You will find these in the Honda forum and there are often many replies by owners with similar problems. There will be one-off problems as with any brand, but IMHO there is no broader pattern of trouble on the reliability front that should bother potential buyers. With the 05 and newer bikes, the reliability record seems solid. Mine has 1,000 miles of hard riding with no problem. That isn't enough to really prove anything, but it does give me confidence.

R

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I agree with goathead666!Myself and three of my buddies bought the 05 TE 450's and we ride the piss out them in the desert.Not one problem from either one of us and we haven't even removed a valve cover yet!Just routine maintenance and your good. :thumbsup:

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Last month, I rode with a guy on a brand new 2006 TE510. I think it was his third time out and he had about 100 miles on the bike. It died way out on the trail. He was there for a couple hours trying to get the bike started. It had some type of electrical short under the tank. It was a really bad day for him. I know him from another forum where he is now trying to sell the bike.

This urban myth not withstanding, The TE450 is a VERRY reliable design....so much so that you will notice even all mighty KTM have developed a new short stroke motor that is identical to Husky on paper. Same bore & stroke and even E-start only like husky had in 04 & 05. :thumbsup:

I put almost 300 hours on my 04 TE450 including numerous Gp and Vet-X races and tons of trail riding all without needing to replace ANYTHING....not even a spark plug. I sold it to a good friend when I bought a new plated TE and it's still going strong.

But, those new aluminum framed WR's look pretty nice.

Is a plate important were you live?

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I have an 06 TE450 with almost 800 dirt miles on it. No problems with the engine. Valves haven't moved a bit either. Also, I ride with two other 06 TE450s and an 05 TE510 and they haven't had any significant issues either. These engines are rock solid.

Like someone else said here, do a search in this forum and others to read about issues with bikes. The only close to what your asking about problem that I am aware of is with the transmission on the TE610, and that is well known and easily fixable. I am not aware of any issues with the TE250, 450, or 510s, and I read this forum regularly.

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To step back and look at this issue on a higher level: The new high output 4 stroke bikes are typically not as maintenance free or as bulletproof as older lower output 4 stroke engines. Example: A 1990's XR250 put out about 18-19hp, and new 250Fs put out up to 33hp stock!!! That's a huge difference, and it means you're pushing things a lot more.

In a recent Dirtbike article, they point out that 250F/450F motors tend to blow up more, and are MUCH more expensive to repair.

Some 250F bikes (2004 crf250X, early 2004 TE250) had valve issues, but you can upgrade the valves if issues occur. The most expensive thing is a bottom end blowup.

Anyways- I think my main point is: The new 4 stroke bikes are a lot more fun, and can be a lot more expensive, and preventative maintenance is flat out critical, and Husqvarnas are by far the easiest F bikes to maintain...

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To step back and look at this issue on a higher level: The new high output 4 stroke bikes are typically not as maintenance free or as bulletproof as older lower output 4 stroke engines. Example: A 1990's XR250 put out about 18-19hp, and new 250Fs put out up to 33hp stock!!! That's a huge difference, and it means you're pushing things a lot more.

In a recent Dirtbike article, they point out that 250F/450F motors tend to blow up more, and are MUCH more expensive to repair.

Some 250F bikes (2004 crf250X, early 2004 TE250) had valve issues, but you can upgrade the valves if issues occur. The most expensive thing is a bottom end blowup.

Anyways- I think my main point is: The new 4 stroke bikes are a lot more fun, and can be a lot more expensive, and preventative maintenance is flat out critical, and Husqvarnas are by far the easiest F bikes to maintain...

The last point here is critital IMHO. Since all modern four strokes need regular maintenance, ease of maintenance is a big deal. The Husky TE is a very easy bike to maintain. Compared with the EXCs, oil and filter changes are a breeze.

The higher stress on modern bikes is also one reason that I went with the 450 instead of the 250. Although I prefer the "feel" of a smaller bike, I know that my riding style and areas would but less stress on the bigger 450 motor. And when I actually do need or want the extra power, it is great fun.

R

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EM_Rider makes good points about the larger bike, but there's also a counterpoint here: The TE250/TE450/TE510 share a lot of components (example: Chain/sprockets, etc) and the TE250 puts less strain on those compoenents. The TE250 also does better with cooling. I think where the TE250 does worse is with RPM related mechanical issues such as the valves. With a 12,500 rpm rev limiter, the TE250 really spins fast, and some things wear more that way...

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TE250 can spin fast - but you don't need to use it there. I like the fact the TE250 is over built a bit.

.

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Here's my vote for the 04 TC450, 18mths of MX & trail riding. Only problem so far, steering head bearings seized after getting too excitied with the pressure washer. This bike is ROCK SOLID which is why I haven't bothered to upgrade it yet.

Maybe I'm lucky, but I'm also fastidious with clean air filters & oil changes & run Motorex valve guard in the fuel. I've kept the battery charged up after each ride and even this has lasted can you believe it. Plus, get to know your bike, look out for crimped wires, ill fiting plastics or loose nuts & bolts. Can happen to anybody and sure does ruin your day. Any new bike needs a couple of "shake down rides" to get it sorted. In many cases, you make your own luck with dirt bikes.

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AussieThumper, you bring up a good point, I would bet the majority of late model Husky owners are older than the average CRF/YZ/WR, ect., owner and because of this likely takes better care of their machines.

That said, I've had 60 hours 1200 miles of dirt joy on my TE! So far so good.

Frequent air filter cleaning/oiling, engine oil+filter and the occasional valve check, funny I did the same on my XR, and I bet it will run until I'm sick and tired of the blue/yellow.

Now I'm needing a Thursday evening night ride, see ya!

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Last month, I rode with a guy on a brand new 2006 TE510. I think it was his third time out and he had about 100 miles on the bike. It died way out on the trail. He was there for a couple hours trying to get the bike started. It had some type of electrical short

A couple of rides ago my Te450 refused to turn over after just starting fine. I noticed that the headlight was on but would not turn the starter over. I quickly checked under the seat ( no tools needed,how nice) and noticed the battery terminals were loose, I guessed that when I tilt the battery up to service the air cleaner it wants to loosen it up. I tighten that up quickly and we are outta there. Total time three minutes, wiring problems are like that that I could have spent hours there too.

I agree too that the Huskys are easy to service and that in it's self will make everything last longer. Parts are easy to come by pretty much if you do need them.

As far as the link suspension on the Husky frames, I always understood this to be an advantage. Less hopping under braking better bump absorption etc...

I Have not had problems with my bikes after thousands of miles of hard riding. just returned from a ride on the TC250 on some local single track stash and I am ALL SMILES.

Go Husky!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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