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soft sand

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how to ride in soft sand and how to turn it to soft sand :thumbsup:

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There's not really a specific way. In sand you can't make sudden severe turns you have to make gradual slow turns. Also you can't really snap the throttle or you'll spin alot, you've got to be gentle.

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dont go to slow if you go to slow your tires will dig in deeper making it harder to keep balance. also softer tire inflation can help but basically pin it and hold on :thumbsup:

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Stay loose on the bike too. If you tense up it'll make things much more difficult.

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in sand, speed is key. power will do nothing other then spin the tire if you don't have the momentum to keep the bike moving forward. As soon as you get the bike moving, up shift. in tight turns, get right up against the tank, this helps drive the front tire into the sand, keeping the front tire in a grove at low speeds. At high speed, if you can't handle the wobble, stand up, and let the bike do what it has to do.

Just like anything else, the best thing you can do is go out and ride. The more you ride sand, the better you will get at it. Just like everything, its technique can not be learned over the net. You have to get out and ride.

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i find that if i stand and not to fight the little ruts that are formed from other riders. dont worry about those at all. but also when starting then get moving but you have go to pin it and shift up. the faster your tire turns the faster you will go and you will start to go on top of the sand instead of through it. and it will be easier to ride.

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In my riding area, there is an all soft sand track, I have untill recentely HATED the place!!! Here is what i did to change my thought. You NEED to soften up the rear sag, to 105-110mm, and go a couple of clicks harder on the compession, and rebound on both the front and rear. This will help keep the bike from kicking on the well rounded bumps, you DO NOT want the bike to 'kick' in the sand!!! You need to re-think your riding style. You need to go through the corners ON THE GAS with a wide sweeping type of arc if you can! even if there is a rut on the inside line! Your new suspension settings, and the ability to stay on the gas Will keep the front wheel up on top of the sand making it much easier to ride! Stay loose, ride fast, and have fun!!!

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My tips for riding in desert sand washes and sand roads. Go fast-go slow and you WILL FALL. Sit back on the seat to take some weight off of the front tire-the tire will wobble and move around a little but that is ok. Keep the engine rpm high (stay in a lower gear). Drag the rear brake slightly, letting up when you want to turn. Plan your cornering so you can take them wide to keep the speed up. Riding in the desert I run 17 psi in the front tire and 15 in the rear which makes sand washes really miseriable :ride: but the above techniques have restored confidence and control. Well that and lots of practice. :thumbsup:

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My tips for riding in desert sand washes and sand roads. Go fast-go slow and you WILL FALL. Sit back on the seat to take some weight off of the front tire-the tire will wobble and move around a little but that is ok. Keep the engine rpm high (stay in a lower gear). Drag the rear brake slightly, letting up when you want to turn. Plan your cornering so you can take them wide to keep the speed up. Riding in the desert I run 17 psi in the front tire and 15 in the rear which makes sand washes really miseriable :applause: but the above techniques have restored confidence and control. Well that and lots of practice. :thumbsup:

I agree to all of it exept "stay in low gear", You dont want torque in sand, you want speed. The faster your wheel spins the better. Stay in a high gear :ride:

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Man...I just raced in Southwick MA. which is known to be a sand track. I practice hard packed and this was tough to say the least. You need to really switch your riding style in these conditions. Tight corners take a lot more lean in order for the front not to wash but don't let the front tire get into the berm too deep. What i found to work best is to stay on the gas in the standing position and just let the bike pull you through. As hard as it is it works and grip tight with your knees to keep the bike in control. The track or trail will get rutted in the sand but you really do not have to worry like in hard pack the bike will ride right through it. The best part of riding sand is you can push the limit because the crashes are like landing in powder sugar.....Good luck and keep trying...

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I agree to all of it exept "stay in low gear", You dont want torque in sand, you want speed. The faster your wheel spins the better. Stay in a high gear :thumbsup:

High gear on sand roads yes, WOT. I keep the rpm high in the sand washes and creekbeds because you never know what is around the next corner and if you do have to suddenly slow down I don't want to lug the engine. I also like to keep the revs up for the unexpected (washouts, BIG rocks, etc) because the sand can really pull your speed down. I'm not saying keep it a red line but riding a thumper with a good torque curve I tend not to wind the motor up when cruising. For example in a wash at a speed that I know the bike can easily maintain in 3rd gear at low rpm I will keep it in second and wind the motor up a bit. Speed and momentum is the key in sand but sometimes you can only go so fast.

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you sure your not riding a two stroke? cause thats what it sounds like. One of the things that makes four strokes so easy to ride/user friendly is that you can lugg them down

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you sure your not riding a two stroke? cause thats what it sounds like. One of the things that makes four strokes so easy to ride/user friendly is that you can lugg them down

Yes, they are 4 strokes-either an xr650 or and xr400. Yes you can lug them down but there is always a point where required torque/HP to maintain forward momentum exceeds actual torque/HP,which results in a stall.

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