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Special tools for top-end rebuild?

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Ah yes, the greatest engine ever made for MX: the two-stroke. :applause:

Marvel at its simplicity and the relative lack of tools (and time... and money) required to rebuild it. :ride:

I own two tools: a hammer... and a bigger hammer. :applause:

If you wanted to get picky you could get a pin puller, but it's not really needed.

A ring compressor? Not really.

A spring puller is handy for the pipe.

Think you've got it covered. :thumbsup:

As far as change/replace, it depends on what interval you're on. Worst case is piston, rings, circlips, wrist pin, bearing, gaskets.

You should inspect the reeds while you're in there and check the rod big end bearing and crank bearings.

Too good to be true, eh? :applause:

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Nope, no special tools. That's if you have a torque wrench and an adapter so you can torque down the base nuts.

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A razor to get off the old gasket's. Maybe a can of Carb. Cleaner to clean up everything.

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If you've done a new 4-stroke top end, the 2-stroke is trivial by comparison. It really is easy. I'd add three things to the above posts:

Measurement tools like feeler gauges, dial bore indicator and micrometer. I like to measure the ring gaps and piston to bore clearance on both the old and new parts. So far, I've found that the new stuff (OEM, Wiseco and JE) is always in spec, so measurements on new items are probably optional. Measurements on the old parts can help you time your top end frequency.

A pressure test setup. It's fairly important to make sure the engine has no leaks when you're done. I've got a pretty good setup now, but I haven't had time to document it. Here's a link to a setup for an ATV. A general rule is that the engine should hold 6 psi of pressure for 6 minutes.

New dowel pins. They're cheap, but invariably, I end up with one that looks a little corroded and needs to be replaced. A dab of grease during assembly helps, but there's always one....

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Are there any special tools needed when doing a new top-end? I was just looking over the owners manual and it sounds easy enough....but I'm a believer in, "If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is". Is it recommended to change/replace anything else while I'm in there?

Torque wrench for sure...what else?

yeah you do you need a big wrench and mabye pliers. oh and a screwdriver flat and phillips.Sorry i need to do that.

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If you've done a new 4-stroke top end, the 2-stroke is trivial by comparison. It really is easy. I'd add three things to the above posts:

Measurement tools like feeler gauges, dial bore indicator and micrometer. I like to measure the ring gaps and piston to bore clearance on both the old and new parts. So far, I've found that the new stuff (OEM, Wiseco and JE) is always in spec, so measurements on new items are probably optional. Measurements on the old parts can help you time your top end frequency.

A pressure test setup. It's fairly important to make sure the engine has no leaks when you're done. I've got a pretty good setup now, but I haven't had time to document it. Here's a link to a setup for an ATV. A general rule is that the engine should hold 6 psi of pressure for 6 minutes.

New dowel pins. They're cheap, but invariably, I end up with one that looks a little corroded and needs to be replaced. A dab of grease during assembly helps, but there's always one....

:thumbsup:

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a ring compressor can help immesnsly the piston will either slide in for u on the first try with ease or you will be in your garuage till 1 in the mornin swearing if youve never done it and def a pair of spring pullers for the pipe if u dont have that then get a screw driver slide it to wear the spring bends to go into the mount and pull that easy and a torque wrench these guys already said so im just re-saying it

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i have to add that the motionpro torque wrench adapter is a must have(at least on the hard to access honda cyl. nuts)...its the best way i found to get the right torque on the nuts,well, if you can get a good crowsfoot that fits, i guess that would work too... :thumbsup:

image.php?productid=21982

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As skipn8r said the pressure test is very important IMHO.

i have to add that the motionpro torque wrench adapter is a must have

Just be sure to reduce your torque values to compensate for the extra length and leverage of the MP adapter.

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don't forget the most important tool to have when workingon engines.........the checkbook. It can solve a lot of the other issues or at least simplify them.

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