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cylinder hone w/ nikasil

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Just used a ball hone. Up and down motion for like 10 seconds max. You don't wanna hone the nikasil off, just scuff it with a crosshatch pattern.

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ive heard of people using scotch brite will that work? I have a ball hone but its not big enough and i have a stone hone but one stone is broke :thumbsup:

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Just used a ball hone. Up and down motion for like 10 seconds max. You don't wanna hone the nikasil off, just scuff it with a crosshatch pattern.

You could chuck the hone up and let it run in the bore over night and in the morning all youd have is a bad pattern in the cylinder and a worn out hone... :thumbsup:

The nikasil is so hard the hone hardly even touches it. All youre doing with the hone is breaking the glaze in the bore so the ring will seat again. The ring is what wears, not the bore...

A 180 grit ball hone is fine...

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I've seen nikasil come off with a hone before. Its possible. The point is a 10 second job will do. All night and you'll have no cylinder left. goofball

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I didn't have enough fuel going to the nitrous system on my snowmobile and that took the top edge of the nikasil off. I agree with the other guy nikasil is so hard you cannot wear through it with a hone.

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on a 2-stroke the ball hone can flake off the nicasil around the port edges but on thumpers you dont have much to worry about- however it shouldnt take more than 20-30 seconds to hone it.

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on a 2-stroke the ball hone can flake off the nicasil around the port edges but on thumpers you dont have much to worry about- however it shouldnt take more than 20-30 seconds to hone it.

the nikalsil coating on honda and yamaha is one of the best stock finishes and on the 2 strokes you almost never see one chip or flake,--

the kawi and suzuki i almost always had to get them re-plated on their 2 strokes because they are week and generally had to much clearance ,

if you get one that flaked while honing it needed to be re-plated anyway to really be corrected !

it already had problems long before you put a hone to it !

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Like what others have said....buy a ball hone (about $40) and run it up and down in the cylinder to achieve that nice cross hatch pattern. In the long run, it will be much cheaper since you will have this tool for future use. :thumbsup:

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The nikasil is so hard the hone hardly even touches it.
It depends on the bike. Pre-'03 Kawasakis for example don't use Nicasil, they use an electrofusion plating process that is vastly inferior to true Nicasil. A hone will damage these cylinders if not very carefully used.
buy a ball hone (about $40) and run it up and down in the cylinder to achieve that nice cross hatch pattern.
You are not going to cut any sort of cross-hatch into a plated cylinder with a ball hone. The plating is too hard to actually be cut by anything other than diamonds.

Never, ever use a finger-type hone on a two-stroke cylinder. You run the risk of the stones getting caught in a port window and chipping the plating off at the edge of the port.

The best way to prep your cylinder for a rebuild is to clean it thoroughly with a Scotch-Brite pad and warm soapy water. Clean it several times, rinse, and then wipe it dry with a white paper towel. If the paper towel doesn't stay white, clean it again, and repeat until the paper towel stays white. After it's clean, inspect the bore surface. If the cross-hatch is not clearly visible, the plating is worn out, and it's time for a re-plate.

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I followed the advice given to me here and purchased a ball hone from MSCDirect ($40) and it cleaned up the cross hatch beautifully. Checked the ring gaps and the thing hasn't lost a drop of oil. Thank you Kelstr. :thumbsup:

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I followed the advice given to me here and purchased a ball hone from MSCDirect ($40) and it cleaned up the cross hatch beautifully. Checked the ring gaps and the thing hasn't lost a drop of oil. Thank you Kelstr. :ride:

Yea, Kelstr is da man! :thumbsup:

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TO the disbelievers....continue to pay someone else way too much for something that you can easily do yourself. This methods works great and you aren't going to cause any damage with a ball hone.

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Please Retire your Ball Hone with the Air cooled Iron Cylinder.

Allmost all Ring installation instructions from OE or Aftermarket Specifically State, " Do Not use a Ball Hone on Plated Cylinders". Most aftermarket Rings are supplied by the same supplier as the OE's and in many cases the aftermarket piston includeds OE rings.

Your OE or Replated cylinder came with a much finer finish than the 280 grit from a Ball hone, more like 400-600 finish. So why would anyone recomend going back in there with a courser Ball Hone? :thumbsup:

I do not see glazing is as much of a issue with modern plated liquid cooled cylinders over there Iron Bore air cooled counterparts.

If no glazing is present nothing really needs to be done as far as cylinder prep. If you must Sctch brite will work or the Correct tool would be a Nylon Soft Hone brush in the area of 400-600 grit.

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Please Retire your Ball Hone with the Air cooled Iron Cylinder.

Allmost all Ring installation instructions from OE or Aftermarket Specifically State, " Do Not use a Ball Hone on Plated Cylinders". Most aftermarket Rings are supplied by the same supplier as the OE's and in many cases the aftermarket piston includeds OE rings.

Your OE or Replated cylinder came with a much finer finish than the 280 grit from a Ball hone, more like 400-600 finish. So why would anyone recomend going back in there with a courser Ball Hone? :ride:

I do not see glazing is as much of a issue with modern plated liquid cooled cylinders over there Iron Bore air cooled counterparts.

If no glazing is present nothing really needs to be done as far as cylinder prep. If you must Sctch brite will work or the Correct tool would be a Nylon Soft Hone brush in the area of 400-600 grit.

yes we all realize and understand the the manuels say to NOT hone and they do say TO OIL the rings and cylinder ---and the say to use a GIRLIE brake in procedure --------but none of that has ever worked for the last 75 YEARS ( in any of the internalcombustion engine markets ) :applause: ( and all cylinders glaze over and become to slick to have a chrome molly ring --or any ring ever bed in )

so the real RACER has had to adapt his technique and found that a totally dry 180 to 240 harsh plateau hone crosshatch dull cylinder assembled dry and spun over dry and warmed up until it pukes coolant at a high rpm ( 18 to 2,000 ) and taken out and beat it like you stole it works the best on these racing 4 stroke motors,------its been this way for over 75 years ------

and these motors wear less make more power run cooler and the combustion chamber stay dry and has less blow- by and lasts longer than if you do the old wet girlie manuel procedure :thumbsup:

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