Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

new suspension question

Recommended Posts

I just installed my new rebuilt/revalved suspension, still using stock springs front and rear. Bike is a 02 250F. Bike is now set for off road, harescrambles, etc.

I set the rear sag at 100mm. WHen I sit on the bike, the front end squats down, but does not return up at all. I havent had a chnace to ride it yet, is this normal? I would think it should come back up some. IS this typical for a woods setup?

It does not return to the full upright position even when i get off the bike. I have to pull it up the last inch or so.

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since your suspension was just rebuilt I'm assumeing that the fork bushings were replaced (bad bushings will cause your problem) so chances are that you may have your R/S fork bound up. Check it like this................

1.) Install both forks and set fork height using calipers or a ruler. It is important that fork height be exactly the same for both sides. Tighten pinch bolts to the proper specs (Top: 18 Ft-Lbs | Lower: 15 Ft-Lbs).

2.) Install the axle and tighten the axle nut to proper spec (75 Ft-Lbs). If the axle turns while tightening, tighten one right side axle pinch bolt to hold axle in place.

3.) Tighten both left side axle pinch bolts to spec (17 Ft-Lbs).

4.) With the left side axle pinch bolts and axle nut tightened, loosen the right side axle pinch bolts. Take a small flathead screwdriver and carefully tap it into the slot between the two right side axle pinch bolts. This will enlarge the axle hole. You will then be able to grab the bottom of the right side fork tube and push it in and pull it out freely. The fork will settle naturally into position on the axle without binding.

5.) Remove the screwdriver and tighten the right side axle pinch bolts to spec (17 Ft-Lbs).

If you're wondering if your forks are currently bound up, put your bike on a stand and start this procedure at Step 4.

Bound forks are a leading cause of premature bushing wear, air build-up, and fork harshness. All of which can be avoided by following these easy steps.

Also make sure to never use a metal hammer to install the axle. The end of it will get mushroomed and not allow the fork to float on the axle. If it is mushroomed then take it out and grind the edge off. If the axle hole has some damage on the edge of it then use a die grinder to smooth it out.

doc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply. Yes, the bushings were replaced, seals, etc. new oil, new revalve.

I took it all apart about 5 times, with the same results. I did what you described above.

It squats real nice the first time it is sat on. After that, if I get off, it doesnt come back up at all. THen when I sit back in it, I have no squat in the front end since it did not come back up.

COuld the revalve be too soft, would that cause this?

The RS fork is certainly tighter to install, and doesnt move as freely as the left when sliding up into the triples. Maybe my triples are bent? Can that cause this?

I guess I dont understand why I get the nice initial squat, if things were bound up or bent I shouldnt even get the initial squat, right?

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will have certain amount of fork sag. Maybe this is what your reffering too. and yes you have to pull up on the bars to take out that sag. Now if you push down on the bars and it doesn't come back to the sag point then you do have issues as Doc mention.

A good way to measure fork sag is with a rubber o-ring or zip tie. When the bike is on the stand slip the o-ring up to the bottom of the wiper. Gently take your steed off the stand then mount your steed. measure the difference and wa la there you go. post what your numbers are and these guy's will help you from there. Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I push down on the bars, it comes back to the point of where it was at its sag. Its just that to stroke the suspension at that point seems hard. I figured after I sat on the bike, and it squated to its sag point, if i bounced up and down, it would go down more and come back up. Seems like it is taking a lot of force once its at its sag point to compress.

I guess I just have to ride it to know................hope to tomorrow/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is your weight? What springs and oil ht. are your forks set at? What rear spring? After re-reading your posts it kinda sounds like maybe your forks are set-up a little to soft. Being a little on the soft side can actually make your forks feel soft.

How many mm's are your forks sitting up in the clamps? If they actually are a little to soft you can try either stiffening the comp. clicks and/or speeding up the rebound or lowering them a little in the clamps.

Give us a little more info and it will make it easier helping ya.

doc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im 170#, about 180 w/gear. Stock springs front and rear. I went to the suspension shop and asked it to be setup for off road hare scrambles in the nj/pa area.

At first he was going to go to a softer spring but decided against doing so, and just revalved rebuilt both the front and rear keeping stock springs.

I didnt notice a sticker with the oil height and weight on the forks like my previous suspension guy put on.

When pushing on the forks individually on the ground, they felt so perfect, better than ever. It was initially "soft" in the stroke, and resistance was increased as it traveled down.

Forks are in the clamps with the upper ring line on the fork tube visible about 1mm above the top triple.

When you said "Being a little on the soft side can actually make your forks feel soft. "

Did you mean Being a little on the soft side can actually make your forks feel hard?.

Good news is I can bring the bike back, and if needed he will revalve and do eveything again no charge. I am just hoping to avoid going back, its not exactly close.

Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I officially hate suspension. I wish it was never invented, and we all rode on stiff POS's with no suspension to speak of. This way I would be at the same level of everyone else.

I dont get it. What could possibly be wrong. Everyone elses front forks seem so nice when I push down on them, nice and smooth, feels great. Mine just flat out suck, so friggin hard to compress.

I havent ridden it due to weather, but I know its not going to get better from just feeling it when stroked and using the front brake. It feels as bad, or worse than before I got the work done.

The suspension gods certainly are angry with me. This blows, have a ride on wed night and a race on sat. I'm ready to just go out and buy a new bike..............

I know the front end is not bound up, I've now taken it apart about 10 times with the same crappy results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

take it back to the suspension shop you had the work done by and they should help you, the more you take it apart then they might say you did something. most shops will work with you. you paid for the revalve so they should assist you for free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can and will take it back to the shop, but was hoping to not have to. Its not close....

Yes, everything is free, so that is good. I just want it to work now, impatient jerk that I am...............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a chance to test it last night, in a spot I havent been to in over a year. I was alone, so I was taking it easy. Goal was to get 30-45 min on it before I ride in the normal ride spot tomorrow. It didnt feel as bad as I thought it would. When going through rocky sections it seemed to handle decent, as long as I stayed on it and carried speed.

I dont believe I ever posted my clickers. They were set at 12 comp and 6 rebound. WHy 6 for rebound by the tuner when stock is 12? IS this due to the revalve?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×