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this is personal opinion, but it is a proven fact that if you warm your bike up first and then ride it as hard as you can, it is actually better for the motor and will make it live a longer life. i think it says it helps seat the rings better or something like that.

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it is a proven fact that if you warm your bike up first and then ride it as hard as you can, it is actually better for the motor and will make it live a longer life. i think it says it helps seat the rings better or something like that.

BS. Total BS.

What's gonna happen is you are going to SCAR your cylinder. Heat cycling seats the rings, not warming it up and pinning it. I worked at a motorcycle dealership, and I actually saw a guy take his freshly rebuilt Banshee out to the parking lot, start it up, let it warm for a brief moment and then rip through the parking lot. Within 10 seconds the engine gave out a loud clank, the whole thing stopped, and he was in need of a $1000+ repair job for both cylinders, heads and a side case.

Others have taken their new bikes out and returned them the next week blown up. It's called "cold seizure".

BTW that Mototune dude is a F**N moron. Plain and simple. The fact he ALSO updates you on UFO sitings and the latest news on two headed babies has to show you something...

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I have built many 2 and 4 stroke motors and have never had a failure do to break in process. I believe in this, heat cycle the motor using 10/40 motorcycle oil only bring it up to operating temp and Let it cool completely. and bring it back up to operating temperature and let it cool once again. Then I dump the oil and run a 20/50 oil for Summertime operation and go out and Rip around the track and finnish off the tank. I let it cool and change the Oil and Run a Torco Semi Syntetic blend 20/50 or Full synthetic in My Hondas and Pitster Pro ( Some Chinese bike wont take a Full Syntetic Blend the clutch will slip and the tranny shifts hard) that has been my exsperiance but others will argue.....

So i believe in Heat cycleing and then going out a Riding it like you would in a race and do not Power shift the bike you must use the clutch Ive never had any problems ( Other than the New 120cc Lifan Motors giving there common problems)

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Heat cycling sounds like a lot of hogwash . The metal that engine parts are made from is molten when they are formed so the metal has already been subjected to far more heat than a properly tuned engine can create . You don't have to be Albert Einstein to understand that !

Then it is further heat treated and stress relieved before it is machined . (maybe NOT in a chinese made engine) Ha Ha Ha !

If the engine is machined right with the bore round , its centerline square and true to the crank , and the piston to bore clearance correct , then the piston can't seize in the bore unless there is inadequate lubrication or the fuel /air ratio is way too lean and causes it to expand too much from excessive combustion temperatures .

As one guy said before , drag engines don't get run in at all and they don't need to because they are properly machined and assembled with the correct clearances , just like an air craft engine . Top fuelers melt holes in pistons from leanouts but they rarely seize . They also use rings with a soft plasma moly coating which allows them to bed in quickly !

Cast pistons actually don't expand as much as forged pistons so they both require different bore clearances . In a nutshell , if a new engine seizes , it's because it was assembled with inadequate clearances , improperly tuned , or suffers from a lack of lubrication or several of those factors . The only other factor would be if it is allowed to overheat due to lack of airflow over the radiators or cooling fins from going too slow in relation to how high it is revving , as in the case of the knucklehead who fried his banshee in the carpark !

Two strokes are risky , high friction motors with lousy lubrication to start with so they would need to run a higher oil to fuel ratio as well during their break in period and you don't want to run them too rich because the fuel actually washes the oil off the bore ! Anyone who wants to argue with that need only drain the sump of their car and fill it with two stroke mix to find out just how lousy a lubrication method it really is .

To bed ANY engine in , you HAVE to load the piston and rings as much as possible without causing too much friction , and that means - not allowing it to rev too high or at any constant rev . Load cycling , continually loading by accelerating then backing off in gear , is how an engine should be run in . That controls the heat created by friction and it should be gradually increased over the break in period . The loading causes the piston to wear into the right shape to reduce friction and the rings to push hard against the bore to allow the honing to do the job it's there to do ~ lap the rings into the cylinder wall to achieve the best sealing possible without letting them scrape too much oil out and weld to the bore .

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To bed ANY engine in , you HAVE to load the piston and rings as much as possible without causing too much friction , and that means - not allowing it to rev too high or at any constant rev . Load cycling , continually loading by accelerating then backing off in gear , is how an engine should be run in . That controls the heat created by friction and it should be gradually increased over the break in period . The loading causes the piston to wear into the right shape to reduce friction and the rings to push hard against the bore to allow the honing to do the job it's there to do ~ lap the rings into the cylinder wall to achieve the best sealing possible without letting them scrape too much oil out and weld to the bore .

Well put evo, you ending explanation made the most sense that ive read in a while, and IMO is right on target :thumbsup:

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Heat cycling sounds like a lot of hogwash . The metal that engine parts are made from is molten when they are formed so the metal has already been subjected to far more heat than a properly tuned engine can create . You don't have to be Albert Einstein to understand that !

Then it is further heat treated and stress relieved before it is machined . (maybe NOT in a chinese made engine) Ha Ha Ha !

If the engine is machined right with the bore round , its centerline square and true to the crank , and the piston to bore clearance correct , then the piston can't seize in the bore unless there is inadequate lubrication or the fuel /air ratio is way too lean and causes it to expand too much from excessive combustion temperatures .

As one guy said before , drag engines don't get run in at all and they don't need to because they are properly machined and assembled with the correct clearances , just like an air craft engine . Top fuelers melt holes in pistons from leanouts but they rarely seize . They also use rings with a soft plasma moly coating which allows them to bed in quickly !

Cast pistons actually don't expand as much as forged pistons so they both require different bore clearances . In a nutshell , if a new engine seizes , it's because it was assembled with inadequate clearances , improperly tuned , or suffers from a lack of lubrication or several of those factors . The only other factor would be if it is allowed to overheat due to lack of airflow over the radiators or cooling fins from going too slow in relation to how high it is revving , as in the case of the knucklehead who fried his banshee in the carpark !

Two strokes are risky , high friction motors with lousy lubrication to start with so they would need to run a higher oil to fuel ratio as well during their break in period and you don't want to run them too rich because the fuel actually washes the oil off the bore ! Anyone who wants to argue with that need only drain the sump of their car and fill it with two stroke mix to find out just how lousy a lubrication method it really is .

To bed ANY engine in , you HAVE to load the piston and rings as much as possible without causing too much friction , and that means - not allowing it to rev too high or at any constant rev . Load cycling , continually loading by accelerating then backing off in gear , is how an engine should be run in . That controls the heat created by friction and it should be gradually increased over the break in period . The loading causes the piston to wear into the right shape to reduce friction and the rings to push hard against the bore to allow the honing to do the job it's there to do ~ lap the rings into the cylinder wall to achieve the best sealing possible without letting them scrape too much oil out and weld to the bore .

Sorry But All I read is a Lot of Mumbo Jumbo^^^^^^.....Heat Cycling Helps Seat the Rings in to the Cylinder. and is the Only part of a Motor (The Kind that we are talking about) (4-Stroke 50-160cc pitbike motors) that needs To be "Broken In" Bringing the Motor up to operating temperature then let Cool and then repeating the proceedure will seat the Rings. Change the oil and have a good rip on the bike for the rest of the tank of gas shifting smooth all through the gears will help complete the process. Everything else will ware properly with the Proper Lubrication and routine Maintainance.

Ive been Building Motorcycle Motors since the early 80's Ive also attended and Graduated from Franklin Institute in Boston Mass. and have a Associates Degree in science for Automotive Technology and before I left the Industry was a certified ASE Master Technition. I was also a Motocross rider with R&D Testing Background for Tassinari Suzuki in New England

I know what Im doing and talking about and It showed with all the Cars and Motorcycles I have built over the years Never Ever a Failure due to initial build "Break in" run time, or what have you.... a few Defective parts and a Bad choice in the oils and Gasoline have caused premature failures in builds that I can count on one hand...Ha Ha Ha

This is My exsperiance and Opinion only

Later

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