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Dualsport chest protection

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I like to do long rides on a variety of terrain from FS road to tight singletrack. I know I should have some torso protection but between my jacket and backpack I find what I have (Acerbis Roost2) not feasible. Can someone recommend something that would work for wearing with a backpack? I already wear elbow/forearm guards too, so I don't know if the compression-type suits would work. Thanks.

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I've had good results with a pressure suit from http://www.highvelocitygear.com/ - 8 months, 2500+ miles, more get-offs and whacks than I want to admit.

The chest protection has been adequate for a few good thwacks and bars in the chest. I like the shoulder and elbow/fore arm protection, since its a suit, it stays put, even on long slides (personally tested, unfortunately). But the real selling point to me is the CE certified back protection. I've tuck and rolled a few times and landed flat once right on my back with no effect at all.

It fits well (pay close attention to the sizing chart) and I ride with it under a jersey in the summer and a jacket in the winter. Had a couple of hot days (100+, fighting my way out of a canyon - Nevada, don't you know) and while I could definately feel the pressure suit, it wasn't oppressive.

The 661 and others look pretty good as well if you are hesitant about ordering something site-unseen, and most big shops carry at least one version. They are all more expensive than a regular chest protector, but that $60 saved is not going to mean alot it you doink your back - right?

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I wear my Fox Airframe over my Jacket, under my backpack. Been working well for 6 years.

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I were a full chest protector, acerbis brand.... with and without a backpack, I just put it on top of the chest protector. There are brands out there that just make the front part and in the back is only straps, check out on of those...

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I wear a TekVest Off Road Rally Sport (complete vest). It is very versatile - I can wear in under or over my unpadded Acerbis enduro jacket, and loose or tight, depending on the amount of ventilation or warmth I want When it's hot I wear it loose over a ventilated Sahara jersey.

In the latter mode I carry a Klim rain/ wind shell that offers a lot of warmth with minimal bulk.

John Davies

Spokane WA

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Been happy with my 661 pressure suit under any good jacket, or alone on hot days.

Got one new on ebay for $100 a while back.

Good back, shoulder, and arm protection with a kidney belt in one piece of gear.

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Hello.

Just curious, when you guys purchase a helmet do you check to see if it has a DOT or SNELL certification? If so, then may I ask why you don't look for the same kind of testing data from your body protection of choice?

Seriously, just a question here.....

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Hello.

Just curious, when you guys purchase a helmet do you check to see if it has a DOT or SNELL certification? If so, then may I ask why you don't look for the same kind of testing data from your body protection of choice?

Seriously, just a question here.....

velocity,

It seems that many of us are not aware that these items can/are certified. I work in the racing industry(cars) and the number of different safety certifications and testing procedures is mind boggling. Europe has the advantage here since they began to standardize this a while agao. Hopefully the same will happen in this country so that we the consumer can become better informed and, as a result, better protected while we ride.

Regards, James

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I have a pressure suit, and I absolutely roast in it. If its wet, and winter, I might be all right. Otherwise, I'm way too hot. I usually just wear a regular chest protector, and have no problems with a backpack. I even ziptie my radio wires to the chest protector.

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I bought the EVS roost protector, the cheapest soft one they make. I wouldn't say it's the most protective of the others mentioned, but it would definitely slow down a tree branch or take some of the blow out of a rock or something. It's super comfy and that was a big concern for me, like you.

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Hello.

Just curious, when you guys purchase a helmet do you check to see if it has a DOT or SNELL certification? If so, then may I ask why you don't look for the same kind of testing data from your body protection of choice?

Seriously, just a question here.....

Actually, without asking, some protective gear comes with certification. A European standard was quoted on the body armor in the Tekna (Tecna? Techna?) jacket I purchased.

Maybe someone who's researched the motorcycle protective clothing and equipment certification standards will share a link.

Whoa! Somebody just DID--me!

http://safety.mraa.org.au/cms/index.php?page=Standards

A ton of other references exist; found (but lost!) a great one, with history of standards and all, and a warning: While "CE" means the European official committee with cognizance, it may also mean "Caveat Emptor" for bogus standards cited.

Am I answering "Velocity_Gear?" My word, your own link has lots of useful info:

http://www.highvelocitygear.com/menupages/products.html

I imagine customers are casual about body armor certification, because this protective equipment hasn't been "legislated," like helmets.

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To me offroad rides and dual sport rides are two entirely different things. If it is an offroad ride with all fire roads and trails then MX gear is perfect. But if it is dual sport ride with twisty pavement then MX gear is not what I am putting on. If there is going to be asphalt along with the trails then I opt for my mesh street bike jacket that has CE armor. Plus I wear street bike CE knee and hip pads under Kevlar MX pants.

I have been down on asphalt a couple of times and nailed by a car once. And I just don't believe MX gear is going to do the job for a serious asphalt smack down and/or slide. My experience is that even relatively low speed asphalt crashes are pretty hard hits and getting nailed by a car is off the charts. Plus sliding on asphalt absolutely eats up gear. I want real impact and road rash protection if my dual sport ride includes cars.

So in answer to Velocity's post, yes I do look at gear certifications. I was a firefighter for 10 years and learned to trust wearing the right gear while also getting to see for myself what happened to people that did not. CE helmet and pad certifications are the best indicators that I know of. It was the Motorcyclist magazine helmet test that got me started looking at the European certification process and G force reduction standards.

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About all of the suits look to be something you would not want to wear on a warm day if your an aggressive rider when you hit that great 10 mile long trail.

I do wear all the MX type protection and it's warm also, but it does let air movement help cool you. My street bike CE type gear has no room for air movement at all.

I do like the hard shell and hard shoulder shell with padding that my chest protector has plus the back is a hard shell with padding also. This set up still needs some improvement for DS riders but I would still rather crash off-road with my chest protector on then with my CE street gear.

IMO....a person is asking for trouble with those large back packs. I have crashed at 54 MPH (GPS) on a dirt road, there is no way your going to stop sliding and roll wearing a back pack.

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At what point does enjoyment end and safety begin? I now ride with more armor than my son wears for football. I have a shift chest protc, elbow and knee pads, full face helmet, boots,, gloves goggles andcarry tools and "parts" just in case. The weight is almost unbearable. I live/ride in So. Nevada (Las Vegas), and in the summer it is HOT. Just stopping the bike, getting on/off, is tiresome. I just want to know when enough is enough.

John in Vegas

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It seems to me that if you are that worried about the danger you would be happier with a different hobby. If my mom hadn't told me it was dangerous, I probably wouldn't have been so interested in motorcycles. Danger goes with the territory. 45 years and 39 bikes later I still like the danger. Wanna see my scars? :worthy:

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It seems to me that if you are that worried about the danger you would be happier with a different hobby. If my mom hadn't told me it was dangerous, I probably wouldn't have been so interested in motorcycles. Danger goes with the territory. 45 years and 39 bikes later I still like the danger. Wanna see my scars? :worthy:

That is the most retarded thing I’ve read all night….thanks for nothing.

As I sit typing with one hand because of a broken collar bone (xr650r hurt me a week ago)…Fear isn’t motivating me to find good protection…not riding sucks ass! And not knowing when I can ride next sucks even more.

There are wrecks that no amount of protection will help you walk away from…but it’s the stupid common crashes that can be a lot worse without the minimal protection…a 10mph get off w/o a helmet can kill you…

Say what you will, but I and other riders care about riding and not being hardcore…with good gear, a crash can keep you off the bike for a few minutes ….not a few months

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Well, Maroast, I guess you aren't in the mood for humor. Sorry.

Actually, I have some really good advice. Instead of rushing from crash to crash, why not learn to ride so you don't crash? As for those 'common stupid crashes' you mention, maybe it would be a benefit to analyze the cause of the crash and learn what you did wrong and make sure you don't repeat that mistake. I am not advocating riding without protective gear. I am just saying that the solution to crashing is more with the rider than the gear.

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