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Quick Draw

XR200R Modification Guide

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Most of these last pages should be in the regular topic listings, not in the modification Guide which for already tested and specific changes/mods.  Questions belong in the forum topics guys!  Don't clutter up the Mod Guide!

 

Swiss

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Most of these last pages should be in the regular topic listings, not in the modification Guide which for already tested and specific changes/mods.  Questions belong in the forum topics guys!  Don't clutter up the Mod Guide!

 

Swiss

 

I have sent PMs to a few suggesting that they would get a faster response by posting in the forum rather that adding a post in a little read thread.

 

QuickDraw started this thread to provide references for modding XR200s. My recommendation to reduce clutter in this thread is to not respond any posts that do not provide reference information for mods. 

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I decided to compile a list of common modifications for the XR200 in hopes of eliminating some of the common questions asked on this forum. These modifications are intended to improve the overall performance of the bike, without sacrificing reliability. Feel free to suggest amendments or things to edit.

The XR200 is an excellent offroad machine; however, it was for the most part obsolete about 20 years ago. The bike can still be accredited to having probably the best reliability of any full size bike out there. When properly setup and modified, the "little XR" can run with the modern big bikes, especially in the tight and nasty technical terrain.

INTAKE: Remove the airbox snorkel on top of the airbox. It just takes a little prying and it's out. For $20-$40, you can get an aftermarket filter (UNI, TwinAir, No Toil), that will help increase airflow. Rejet one size up on the main and pilot.

Here are the stock jetting specs to give you a basline:

Stock jetting

XR200 (not XR200R)

main 102

pilot 35

Needle position 3rd groove

Pilot screw initial setting 1 3/4 turns out

XR200R (81-83 only)

Main 138

Pilot none

Needle position 3rd grove

Pilot screw initial setting 2 1/2 turns out

XR200R (86 and later)

Main 112 (86) 110 (87 and later)

pilot 38 35(98 and later CA only)

Needle position 3rd groove

Pilot screw initial setting 1 1/8 turns out

When these things are done, the bike will breath much better. This is the single greatest modification for a bike ridden at high altitude.

Overall cost w/out filter: about $10 for jets; $20-$40 for the aftermarket filter

ENGINE: The greatest improvement to the XR200R engine is a big bore kit. Here are the 2 most common kits: http://www.powroll.com/P_HONDA_XR200.htm

Other options include porting and polishing the head, high compression pistons, hotter cams, etc. The more you do, the more reliability is reduced, but it is a trade off for power. Another option is an ’83 -’85 ATC200X cylinder head. It has a .5mm smaller bore, so it would need to be bored to 65.5mm, however, it has much larger cooling fins. For motors that are constantly being run in extreme temperatures, this is an option to consider.

Overall cost: Varies by modification, expect to drop $200-$1000

EXHAUST: There are several aftermarket exhausts on the market. These range from silencers to full systems. Prices range from $80-$500. Most aftermarket exhausts will give about the same improvement. The engine will rev quicker, which can be nice, but mostly they all just make the bike louder. For mild improvement to the stock system: grind the weld off of the inside of the header and remove the small cap held on by 2 8mm bolts at the exhaust tip.

Overall cost: 0-$500

SUSPENSION: This is a major weakness with '92-'02 XR200s. The first option for the forks is to give the springs more preload by adding a larger spacer on top of the springs. The second, most common option is to swap out the entire suspension. '84-'91 XR200 forks and rear shocks will bolt right up, and ‘81-’83 XR200R forks will with the corresponding triple clamps. '84-'89 CR125/250 front ends will bolt up to any XR200R with the addition of a spacer. This particular swap is more complicated, but also adds a disc brake and improves the bike tremendously when used in combination with an '84-'91 XR200 rear shock. See this thread for more info on CR front ends: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/sho...1&parentpage=2 These parts frequently show up on Ebay and can be obtained very cheap. Also, a visit to racetech.com or similar suspension tuning company couldn't hurt with any setup. Emulators and progressive springs will get conventional forks nice and plush. Currently, XR250 rear shocks are in question as to what years will work; therefore, I do not recommend them at this point. Many people have them on their 200, however there is not a definitive answer for the years yet. Be sure to research before you buy.

Overall cost: Generally less than $100; for Racetech tuning, expect to drop $200+.

WHEELS: An 18" rear wheel from an '86-'89 XR250 will bolt right up. This can help because the 17" wheel spins too much sometimes, and tends to work its own spokes loose. There is also a much greater tire selection with the 18" rear wheel.

Overall cost: Generally less than $100

LIGHTING/DUAL SPORT: Lights can easily be added to the 200 by tying into a pink wire that just comes up under the tank, then loops right back down to the stator. This wire has no purpose, and was left behind in the wiring harness, because the non-American XR200s had lights, and Honda didn't pay to change the wiring harness or the stator. I have personally tested it up to 75 watts, but I wouldn't recommend going much higher. From there it is simply a matter of wiring it the way you want it. In any application you will need a 12v voltage regulator. I would be happy to assist with any questions on the wiring you may have, since I have redone mine several times to change things. Also, please visit this thread for some diagrams (about halfway down the page): http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=431097 Each wiring job is different, so it is difficult to write a generalized way to do it. For dual sporting, there are kits from Baja Designs and similar companies, or you can be creative and pull parts together yourself, and in result save lots of money. The first time I had lights on my bike, it only cost me $6. A speedometer cable can be attached to the speedometer port on the front brake hub, as long as you can find a way to mount the speedometer. TrailTech computers are the easy alternative to the manual speedometer.

Overall cost: Dependent upon creativity. Baja Designs kit runs around $450

Helpful XR200 Links:

www-staff.lboro.ac.uk/~elvpc/papers/XR200.html (engine info)

http://www.4strokes.com/tech/honda/lightup/ (adding lights)

**I need more links for XR200 INFORMATION, NOT PRODUCT websites....Post them in this thread if you have them***

Again, please feel free to suggest editing....I'm sure there are MANY things I forgot. This is just a baseline to get started.

 I got a rear shock from a '82 xr250r {EBAY $40.00} and with some SLIGHT modification, it works like a dream on my 2001 XR200R. I had to make a bushing at work. .6295 OD ( outside diameter ) .325 ID and 1.180 long. I made it out of high strength industrial nyon. That is for the top mounting point. the bottom was the same. I got to get a tab welded to the frame for the remote resvoir. but that's it. ride height is bout 1/2  inch higher.

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Hey everyone!

 

I'm just about finished a rebuild of my 1994 XR200R that I bought new in 1993. I would have been 16 at the time.

 

The info on this forum and this thread in particular have been a big help and I can't wait to ride it when the weather starts to get a bit better. Here's what I've done...

 

Bodywork: Honda Front Number Plate, Hand Guards, Clarke Manufacturing Gas Tank, Maier USA Side Panels - Rear Fender - Front Fender, XRs Only Seat Cover - Bike Graphics - Tank Graphics

 

Controls: '94 XR200R Rear Brake Rod, '02 XR200R Footpegs, Protaper 7/8" SE Handlebars, Protaper Pillow Top Lite Grips

 

Drivetrain: IRC Vulcan Tires, JT chain & sprockets

 

Engine: '94 XR200R Ignition Coil & Cap, new PZ27 Carburetor, 6Sigma Jetting Kit, FMF Powercore 4 Muffler, Uni Air Filter

 

Suspension: '84 XR250R Shock, '90 XR200R Forks, Racetech Gold Valve Emulators, Progressive Suspension Fork Springs, Moose Racing Fork & Dust Seals, Moose Racing Fork Bushing Kit, new fork boots

 

Thanks to everyone who has contributed to this great resource!

XR200R rebuild 4.jpg

XR200R rebuild 5.jpg

Edited by ShuswapXR
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Here is a little bit of info. I put a recondition rear shock in my 1990 xr 200 out of a 1980 bike. It is shorter and lowers the seat height. Bolts right up. I made a mounting block for the top to increase the seat height back to normal. I can remove this block and my son can ride it. 

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Here is a little bit of info. I put a recondition rear shock in my 1990 xr 200 out of a 1980 bike. It is shorter and lowers the seat height. Bolts right up. I made a mounting block for the top to increase the seat height back to normal. I can remove this block and my son can ride it. 

 

The shock from the '84 XR250 bolts right up too but it is slightly longer - maybe 1/4" or 1/2". This raised my bike (a '94 with the short travel suspension) by almost 2" in the rear which was perfect combined with the longer '90 forks.

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Wow, great post with a lot of good info!  I just picked this up last night for my wife:

 

IMG_20140219_190838_323_zps656dd6cb.jpg

 

IMG_20140219_190855_461_zpsd4d471a4.jpg

 

It seems I inadvertently got lucky because this is a 91 model.  I'm going to clean it up and dress it up a little and pretty much leave it alone other than that!  I may end up putting a spacer in the forks since they need to come apart for new seals anyway.  In reading up on all the disc conversions I don't think the juice is worth the squeeze at the moment, we will have to see how into riding the wife gets and go from there :D

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My 99, XR200r modified to:

FMF Powercore 4... amazing improvement.

Progressive front fork springs.. much improved.

BAJA Designs lighting kit... works great.

Now all it needs is a different rear shock...

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Don't know if it's been mentioned before, but it seems as though modern KTM pegs fill fit an 82 XR200 with very little work.

 

I've no pictures yet as I only fitted them this afternoon, but I've gone from the tiny standard pegs up to a set of larger than standard aftermarket KTM ones (kindly donated by my KTM.....)

 

The angles are the same and the hole is the right diameter and in the right place, it's just that the KTM ones are a  few mm to thick for the XR mount.  a few minutes with the grinder and they're in :thumbsup:

 

I don't know whether there will be any strength isses yet, but they're still as thick as the original Honda ones so I can't see it being a problem in normal use (like not MX'ing) 

 

Pics to follow :thumbsup:

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Pics as promised.

 

Pics show original KTM one on left, new one in midle and original Honda one on the right, plus one of it fitted.

 

Pretty much it meant grinding off the ring either side of the KTM ones and a tiny bit more off the whole of each flat side if that makes sense.

 

Even the original Honda springs still fit.

 

 

 

 

103_1808.JPG

103_1809.JPG

103_1810.JPG

103_1811.JPG

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Well, my winter project is complete! I have managed to turn this...

 

1584b7b0a7cc60a9.jpg

(not actually my bike - mine was much more beat up - but this is what it looked like once)

...into this!! :banana:

 

P3210026.JPG

P3210027.JPG

P3210028.JPG

 

Thanks to everyone who has contributed to this great resource and also to the XR200 Chassis & Suspension thread.

 

Cheers! :cheers:

 

Chris

Edited by ShuswapXR
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Does anyone know what the various amounts of Shock Stroke each of the stock XR models have on their shocks from all of the single shock models 100cc-400cc?  I am primarily concerned with the XR200R and XR250R models for conversion purposes.  I would also like to know what the shock body and shaft Diameters are if anyone has the information.

 

Thanks

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I have been looking into putting a bigger carb on my 02 XR200R,  I still have a lot to confirm but I figured I'd share what I have learned so far. I would prefer to install a Keihin carb, however Keihin or Mikuni don't seem to make a flange style carb over 26mm like comes stock on the bike. They do make multiple 28mm carbs with the spigot style mount, so here's what I am thinking. I am going to order the intake for the cylinder side of the carb from a 2003 CRF230 if my theory is right the bolt pattern to mount it to the cylinder should be the same as my XR. If it is, this could open the door to a variety of carbs. In the meantime I have been looking into what the ultimate carb bore size would be for the XR. This lead me to learn that most carbs for cars or trucks are rated by CFM which can be calculated from various info about your engine. Using a CFM calculator I found online I learned the calculated CFM for 2002 XR200R would be 38 CFM. If my calculation is correct I somehow need to determine how to use that CFM# to calculate the best bore size for the carb because I cannot find CFM ratings on any of the motorcycle carbs. That's what I have learned so far I will post more as I learn from trial and error. If anyone reading this thread is familiar with the calculations I am speaking of could you please confirm the 38 CFM rating for a 2002 XR200R.

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you could put a large throat carburetor on it. you will gain some topend, and lose lowend torque. I don't know how to rate motorcycle carbs based on flow. I suspect, there is a sweet spot for ranges of air speed in a caburetor where it will atomize the best. you could derive airspeed range (idle to max rpm) in a automotive carburetor from the CFM and venturi size, and then arrive at the venturi size that you would need on a motorcycle carb to have a similar airspeed range. probably just a simple linear graph of CFM vs. venturi cross section.

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Quick question, for 86 on up it says

Main 112(86) 110 (87 later)

Pilot 38 35 (98 and later ca only)

Needle position 3

I have a 1988 so does that mean I don't need to 're jet the pilot and is the Needle position 3 from the top or bottom. Also I have a super trapp muffler and a uni filter. Will I need to go even larger on jetting ? The muffler is used but repacked and I will take a couple plates out to reduce noise and as a bit more back pressure . Thanks

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I know this is an old topic but I thought I might add my two cents. My wife has a 2002 XR200R. I read this post and thought it would be a fun and inexpensive project. I began by locating parts on eBay. I found some forks from an '85 XR200R for $100 and bought them. I also bought the rear shock from an '85 XR250 for $100. The forks are in great condition but leak badly so I bought new seals. I figuered it made sense to replace the bushings and o-rings while I have the forks apart. I will be taking the rear shock in for service before mounting it. I pulled the snorkel from the air box and added a Twin Air filter. I also pulled the little cap/restrictor from the end of the silencer. I was surprised when I checked the jetting. It had a 45 pilot and a 105 main. I tried going up one with both but obviously 48 was too big for the pilot. It was way too rich and would only run with the choke fully open. Come to think of it, the 45 was probably too big as well. I'm going to try the other direction and see how it runs with a 40. The bump up to a 110 main felt pretty good. The top end was way more peppy and stong. Heck, I may try a 115 and see if that will work even better. I'll post again when I have more done. Maybe even some before and after pics.

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