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How to adjust Sag on front suspension?

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Hi,

Search is down so I thought I'd ask. I played with adjusting the race sag and checked the sag on the rear suspension of my 06 S model the other day. I weigh about 210 lbs. so I know that between the posts I've read and my measurements that I need a heavier spring.

My question is about the front end suspension, at the present setting I don't have enough race sag. How do you adjust this setting, shims or do I need some different springs?

I set the rear up with four inches of race sag and backed the compression off completely on the front shocks, it seems to be a step in the right direction. I can now stand flat footed where before I was up on the balls of my feet when straddling the bike and the bike seems much better behaved.

Thanks,

Jeff

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good article-didnt really read it, just scanned it, so in case I missed it and it's there, I apologise for the redundancy, in case it isnt there: here: the front at 210lbs is too soft for you. You need a set of .48 kg/mm springs (can get from tt store cost about 120$ a set) and then you will be able to set the race sag and have a decent static sag (important for stability and steering) Other wise the only way to get the front end up where it belongs is to shim it with a stack of big washers or a chuck of pvc tubing (about 1" long to start). I did the springs and put in heavier oil and love it.

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As Robb wisely suggests, a set of .48 forksprings would suit your body weight of 210 lbs, along with a 5.7 rear spring.

Spacers or shims in the front forks are a half-measure at best.

Keep in mind that setting up your suspension is also very much dependent on the type of terrain you ride...

I am the same weight as you, and I still have the stock springs in my 'S' model. The plushness of the stock suspension actually suits the very rocky terrain we have to deal with in this part of the world, very well. I can go fast, and get tired less quickly on my stock 'S' suspension, than my buddy can on his modified WR400 suspension. So slightly plush is not always a bad thing. Just don't try to do a lot of jumps at your weight, with the stock setup.

Just as a reference, since I am the same weight as you, here's my settings for the stock S model suspension...

-Rear spring preload set at 9 7/8 inches of static installed spring length.

-Blue high-speed comp adjuster nut turned all the way out.

-Rear comp and rebound clickers set 2 to 3 clicks stiffer than stock.

-Front comp and rebound clickers set 2 to 3 clicks stiffer than stock.

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My riding is pretty tame, mostly fire roads and spurs. I see myself getting a little faster and more aggressive as time goes on, I've been out of bikes for a long time.

I appreciate your answers, these give me some options to play with. I'm a little financially challenged right at the moment, too many DRZ accessories lately so springs might have to wait. I can appreciate what DRZ400SK4 said about having a little softer(plusher) front suspension especially at my skill level.

Thank You,

Jeff

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I agree with geoff (sk4) re plushness but found that after springs I am even less tired chasing down wr's than I used to be. The plushness has a lot more to do with damping than with spring rates and the stiffer springs keep the steering slow and gentle, eliminating the twitchiness that the stockers give on choppy terrain (rocks, roots, ruts) so I would recommend them as a future mod. I ride with a couple of guys bigger than me (I weigh 220lbs) and they are running stock springs. The difference is night and day and really should be done before any power mods as it offers the best bang for buck-and I am usually broke so that is important to me.

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My suggestion would to be (at 210 lbs) set up the best you can and ride your bike for now..determine which springs are going to be needed for your weight....purchase them as you have the funds....change the springs when it is time to have your suspension serviced (once per year on average) I am 230 lbs and actually was able to set my sag within the limit, but I am going to step up to the stiffer springs come service time...

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The difference is night and day and really should be done before any power mods as it offers the best bang for buck-and I am usually broke so that is important to me.

I agree, Robb...

After tires and gearing, springs to match your weight should be next on the list for DRZ trail riders.

I'm hoping to install a set of .48 fronts, and a 5.7 rear, on mine over the winter.

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The question was about front sag? I have an SM and have searched in vain for any baseline numbers for setting sag on the front end?

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The question was about front sag? I have an SM and have searched in vain for any baseline numbers for setting sag on the front end?

Here's the only figures I've seen on the front end so far. I hope this helps.

Jeff

It is important to note that there are no magic Sag numbers. However here are some guidelines to use as starting points.

Bike Type Front % Front mm Rear % Rear mm Rear Free Sag mm

Off-Road Bikes 22-25% 65-75mm 30-33% 95-100mm 15-25mm

Off-Road 80cc Mini's 22-25% 55-65mm 30-33% 75-80mm 10-20mm

Street Bikes 28-33% 30-35mm 28-33% 30-35mm 0-5mm

Road Race Bikes 23-27% 25-30mm 23-27% 25-30mm 0-5mm

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I agree with geoff (sk4) re plushness but found that after springs I am even less tired chasing down wr's than I used to be. The plushness has a lot more to do with damping than with spring rates and the stiffer springs keep the steering slow and gentle, eliminating the twitchiness that the stockers give on choppy terrain (rocks, roots, ruts) so I would recommend them as a future mod. I ride with a couple of guys bigger than me (I weigh 220lbs) and they are running stock springs. The difference is night and day and really should be done before any power mods as it offers the best bang for buck-and I am usually broke so that is important to me.

Today

05:34 AM

I would've taken your statement about doing suspension mods before power mods with a grain of salt before this last week. Just the little bit I've played with the suspenion settings have left me much more in the control of the bike and more comfortable to boot. I'm a believer!!!

Jeff

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Thank you. I feel dumb. It finally dawned on me that noone talks about about front end sag numbers because there is no preload adjustment. Without a preload adjuster, you just have to get the correct springs. From everything I have read I am guessing that I should be lookin at about 55mm of rider sag up front. I am a light rider, so even with stock springs, I only have 44mm. Springs too stiff. I could still be way off here. Good news is that the stock rear spring set to 85mm (30mm of static sag)for SM application is perfect for my weight. My very limited suspension experience come from sportbikes. Thanks again Mallard, your info helped.

Here's the only figures I've seen on the front end so far. I hope this helps.

Jeff

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