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Sunday in Keithsburg

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This is a most excellent post - tell me more about this Keithsburg place !

What happen to Mr.Booger nuts ?

What kind of oil would you recommend to use there at Keithsburg ?

Weld it

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KEVXR416: Peanut oil.

At what ratio ? ?

Salted or unsalted ?

Weld it

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Unsalted silly.

Salt causes corrosion.

Oh, and .000567 wt. works best.

hmmmmmmmm I never thought about the salt being corrosive, most excellent

point there you have Mr.KevXR416.

Do you have that in metric form for the weight of oil ? ?

Weld it

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I have another oil related question :

What is the difference between viscosity and weight of oils ?

Weld it

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hmmmmmmmm I never thought about the salt being corrosive, most excellent

point there you have Mr.KevXR416.

Do you have that in metric form for the weight of oil ? ?

Weld it

Um, no I dont.

This interesting though.

Refined peanut oil could be used in a wide range of manufactured food products such as biscuits, cakes, crisps and KTM 300's. It could also be present in food eaten in catering establishments. However, it is expensive. Manufacturers are more likely to use other, similar refined vegetable oils such as rapeseed, sunflower or soya.

Pretty cool, huh?

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I have another oil related question :

What is the difference between viscosity and weight of oils ?

Weld it

Engine oils can be either a straight weight or a multi-grade viscosity. Originally, all oils were straight weights. Relatively few straight weights are manufactured today since most gas- or diesel-engine manufacturers recommend multi-grades. At operating temperature, a straight weight performs just as well as a multi -viscosity oil, and there is nothing wrong with using a straight weight. It's just a simpler form of oil. Some diesel fleets still use straight weights, as do about half the piston aircraft operators.

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Quote:

Refined peanut oil could be used in a wide range of manufactured food products such as biscuits, cakes, crisps and KTM 300's. It could also be present in food eaten in catering establishments. However, it is expensive. Manufacturers are more likely to use other, similar refined vegetable oils such as rapeseed, sunflower or soya.

Pretty cool, huh?

Yes, that is but I have heard it makes for a very good valve train lubricant

for the modern day 4 strokes. Especially Austrian made bikes, they seem to

thrive on peanut oil. Also little known fact to be used as body oil on some

younger females.

Weld it

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I just might make it down there Sunday, what time will you guys be there?

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Engine oils can be either a straight weight or a multi-grade viscosity. Originally, all oils were straight weights. Relatively few straight weights are manufactured today since most gas- or diesel-engine manufacturers recommend multi-grades. At operating temperature, a straight weight performs just as well as a multi -viscosity oil, and there is nothing wrong with using a straight weight. It's just a simpler form of oil. Some diesel fleets still use straight weights, as do about half the piston aircraft operators.

I'm an oil salesman. I come here to get away from work. Why did you have to go and ruin it for me??????????:cheers::p:bonk::crazy:

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I'm an oil salesman. I come here to get away from work. Why did you have to go and ruin it for me??????????:cheers::p:bonk::crazy:

Because that is what he does......

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Good day of riding at K-burg, little "nippy" at first but things warmed nicely and a good time was had by all.....

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