What kind of Trans Oil

I have a 99 YZ250 and in the owners manual it says use 10W30 motor oil in the crank case. Is it ok to just use valvoline or equivalent motor oil or do i have to use yamalube or some other type of motorcycle oil?

Good question, Iam new to it too, so I cant tell you but Iam very interested.

You have to be careful that the oil does not have friction additives. Most new car oils do. These will cause your clutch to slip bad. These oils have a emblem on them that says "For Gasoline Engines" . Motorcycle specific oil has better additives that keep the oil from breaking down. Gears break oil down fast. Shell Rotella is a excellent oil as well. It is cheap and readily available. Synthetics are fine as long as they do not have the "For Gasoline Engines" emblem.

When you say shell Rottela t do you mean the 15-40 dino made for diesel?

Run motorcycle specific oil. THey make it for a reason. I run Mobil One Racing 4T in the tranny and Racing 2T for premix. it is 10W40. My '05 YZ250 calls for 10W-30 as well. Don't just dump a quart of car oil in there.:thumbsup::devil:

Run motorcycle specific oil. THey make it for a reason. I run Mobil One Racing 4T in the tranny and Racing 2T for premix. it is 10W40. My '05 YZ250 calls for 10W-30 as well. Don't just dump a quart of car oil in there.:thumbsup::devil:

There are plenty of good motorcycle oils out there

ATF Type F

When you say shell Rottela t do you mean the 15-40 dino made for diesel?

Yes, that's the one. You can use the synthetic also if you like. Diesel oils still have the good additives(Zinc/Phosphorus) they have sence taken out of car oils. Mobil1 4t is a excellent oil. It is a little pricey and hard to find sometimes. I can always find the Shell.

Here is another vote for the Rotella. The gallon at Wal Mart sells for less than 8 bucks. The 4 stroke guys have been using it for years. Many have paid to have it analyzed and it always checked out.

I know they make specific motorcycle oil's so feel free to use one of those if you wish. However, the biggest reason they make them is to increase profits.

And yet another one for shell. I buy it in the 5 gallon buckets, because I also use it in my tractors, and have used it in my 4t both trans and engine and now my 2t. The good thing here is it is cheap and plentiful and never had any bad issues because of it.:thumbsup: I just recently had someone tell me that using that oil was going to ruin my trans, but then again he was against the fair class rule change also. Go figure. LOL

I have also heard nothing negative about Rotella, but I sleep so much beter at night knowing I have Motorcycle oil in my tranny.:cry::bonk::thumbsup::devil::smirk: :smirk: :cry:

I have also heard nothing negative about Rotella, but I sleep so much beter at night knowing I have Motorcycle oil in my tranny.:cry::bonk::thumbsup::devil::smirk: :smirk: :cry:

There is something to be said for this thought. A person does need to feel comfortable with what they are using. When I bought the Hinson clutch, Hinson set me up with several quarts of their oil. Good stuff. I felt like th ebike shifted better when using it.

ROTELLA here also

When i bought my 2 stroke , the guy never changed the tranny oil in the 3 months that he had it, so i thought i was doing it good by putting some 10W40 motorcycle oil. Guess not, it started slipping like hell a couple of hours later. :thumbsup:

I have been using only Belray Gear Saver,i think its W80. Its dosnet apper that thick tho, its liquid red in color, comes out flat grey color after a few rides, so far so good.

I run Rotella.

When i bought my 2 stroke , the guy never changed the tranny oil in the 3 months that he had it, so i thought i was doing it good by putting some 10W40 motorcycle oil. Guess not, it started slipping like hell a couple of hours later. :thumbsup:

I have been using only Belray Gear Saver,i think its W80. Its dosnet apper that thick tho, its liquid red in color, comes out flat grey color after a few rides, so far so good.

I used the Bel Ray a while back myself. I really liked how the bike shifted with it in there. I stopped using it after I saw that it dyed my clutch plates red. No reason to stop, really. I just hated the idea that red dye was in the oil. Oddly enough, I would have klept using it if the plates were blue. That would not have bothered me.

:smirk::bonk::cry: :cry: :cry::bonk::p:busted::ride: :ride: :bonk:

I would have klept using it if the plates were blue. That would not have bothered me.

:thumbsup::devil::smirk:

fact: any 4-stroke motorcycle engine oil will do as transmission oil for 2-stroke bikes. no special type of oil needed, may it be mineral-based or synthetic-based, they will do just fine as long as it's an oil for motorcycles.

....but i'm using motul transoil expert and shifting is at prime :thumbsup:

You have to be careful that the oil does not have friction additives. Most new car oils do. These will cause your clutch to slip bad. These oils have a emblem on them that says "For Gasoline Engines" . Motorcycle specific oil has better additives that keep the oil from breaking down. Gears break oil down fast. Shell Rotella is a excellent oil as well. It is cheap and readily available. Synthetics are fine as long as they do not have the "For Gasoline Engines" emblem.

I realize that you are just trying to be helpful, Firedude, but some of these warnings are way off base, and simply not true.

Don't feel lonely, though...as each and every time a thread like this pops up, there will always be at least one person providing the very same warnings.

Folks seem to get all worked up over oil, and very few folks really have a clue as to what they are talking about. The infomration that has become "comman knowledge" or "conventional wisdom" has been tainted over the years.

Several reasons for this tainting of information...and one of the biggest reasons is that the mfg's just sit back and let the track myths and dealerspeak BS fly, because they often times see greater profits by simply allowing the consumer to remain ignorant to the real deal.

First off,

An oil that carries a certification symbol is simply stating that the mfg has paid a fee to certify the oil to pass certain tests and conditions.

An oil that states it is for Gasoline Engines, means just that...it will work in a gasoline engine. And more than likely, it will be fine and will protect the working parts of your bikes motor.

There are no "special" additives placed into motorcycle specific oils to keep them from breaking down. Some oils have a higher TBN (total base number) than others, and the higher this number is, generally the longer it takes for the oil to become acidic, which leads to oxidation and the oil wearing out.

HDEO's (heavy duty engine oils) have a very high TBN, and as a result tend to last a longer time than an oil with a lesser TBN.

But, the differences we are talking about when considering the TBN of an oil, is only pertinent if you are using your oil for extended periods of time. I'm talking about one oil being able to stay in grade and healthy in a car engine for a period of 7000 miles and another with a healthy additive package, and a resulting high TBN being able to stay in grade and healthy for 10,000 miles or more.

This has nothing to do with dirt bike engines, since we should be changing out our oil long before it will actually wear out. Especially when these oils are used with a wet clutch, where fibers and lots of particulate can be produced in a short period of time.

Considering that we should really only leave any engine oil in the bike for no longer than 6 hours of run time or so, even the cheapest oil on the shelf will more than likely remain able to keep the parts protected just fine. And probably just as well as the high-dollar boutique oil.

Let's talk about the friction modifier scare...

First we have to understand that ALL engine oils have friction modifying additives of some sort. Oil is simply a fluid that contains additives. The carrier fluid has the ability to keep the parts seperated and keep them from wearing in certain conditions, and the additives are in place to do the very same thing, but in conditions where the fluid (base oil) cannot do the job.

Oils are always being put through testing and certifications, and the oils are constantly changing from year to year. Many times these changes are due to the mfg wanting to provide an improved product that he can produce for a cheaper price. But other times the changes come about as a result of some sort of regulatory group mandating that the changes be made.

A few years ago, the EPA decided that from test results, that oils with a higher level of an additive called phosphorus could possibly cause the catalytic converter on a car to clog up a bit. When a cat. converter clogs up, it can no longer do what it was intended to do...which is reduce the carbon monoxide put out by the motors combustion process.

The EPA stated that oils that had a reduced level of the phosphorus additive could be certifed as EC or "Energy Conserving". Now, the EC certification meant that the oil could only have so much phosphorus in the mix, so the mfg may have chosen to put another similar additive in it's place so it would still meet other criteria of the certification testing. Some mfg's used an increased level of molybdenum to take up the slack of the lost phosphorus that the EC certification called for.

Many folks, with a limited true knowledge of the topic, knew from hearsay that molybdenum could cause a wet clutch assembly to slip, due to moly's fantastic ability to reduce friction by using a plating action on the metal surfaces. This half-baked knowledge of moly turned into what is the biggest misconception about engine oils in the motosports world today.

The truth is this...

Yes, the form of moly that is used in industrial gear oils, greases, and chain lubes (molybdenum disulfide, MoS2) is in fact an additive that can and will make a clutch plate slip easily. However, this is NOT what motor oils have in them. Many motor oils have moly in them...which are indeed called "friction modifiers", but the moly that is used in motor oils is a soluable form of the element called molybdenum dithiocarbamate (MoDTC). This form of moly is in many, many engine oils today. Including many of the moto specific boutique oils...even the ones that claim the do not contain friction modifiers!

Just seeing the EC certification on an oil bottle does NOT mean it will cause your clutch to slip if you use it. It most likely will not do this.

Sure, one oil may actually have a different feel when shifting that another oil. And yes, it is possible to find an oil that will make your clutch slip...but not very likely.

And the oil mfg's that do have motorcycle specific oils are not going to go out of their way to help us, the consumers, to really know and understand the truth about this matter. And the main reason for this is because these mfg's all make an oil that they are elevating the price on. The oil may well have a cousin of it's own brand on the shelf, marketed to cars, that is almost the identical oil that is in the motorcycle bottle, but at a lesser price.

If you learn that they are really not offering you much of a value product with their moto specific offerings, you may start speding less on their products...so they want you to remain ignorant, and listen to all the rumor passers, and clueless dealers, and myth passers, about how using other than moto specific oil is a bad thing and will cause you problems.

As long as we remain dumbed-down, the motocycle specific oil manufacturer will enjoy increased profits.

That's not to say that all moto specific oils aren't good oils. Many of them are very good oils, with very robust additive packages...and will do a fine job.

But, there are also many, many oils on the shelf at Walmart that are as good or even better than the moto specific fluids.

And there are also moto-specific oils that are not much to brag about. Very comman oils that have mediocre additive packages, BUT they are marketed towards the moto crowd...hoping for the elevated profits, and the uneducated consumer figures that since it has a bike on the label, and it is MA rated, and the guy at the dealer told them that it was the shiznit of oils, and that if they chose to use a lesser "For Cars Only oil",(which doesn't exist), they shell out the $10-12 a quart.

Not only could you easily be using an inferior oil, you may also delay your change-outs because your oils costs so darn much a pop. They guy who decided to use $1 a quart Havoline 10w-40 and change it out every 2-4 hours, will enjoy a FAR better protected and longer lasting engine than the guy who spent $10 a quart for his moto oil and runs it for 10-15 hours.

There are stories of how a person, or their "buddy", used one of these "car" oils and their clutch started slipping like hell, and the bike just didn'st shift right.

That may well be the situation they experienced, but 99 times out of 100 when this happens, it is more than likely due to another mechanical issue that simply hadn't shown itself yet. There are slight frictional differences in just about any oil or fluid, and if your bike is suffering from sacked out clutch springs, and smoked clutch plates, the use of a different oil may well bring these mechanical issues to light. But, often times the problems are blamed on the oil used, rather than the real culprit.

If the bike were in top mechanical condition to start, the slight frictional differences from one oil to another are almost undetectable in most instances. This includes the difference between a $2 10w-30 EC rated car oil, and a $12 moto-specific boutique oil.

Jeez I hate it when someboby puts a great deal of LOGIC into an old debate:applause:

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