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Rim locks

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I never seem to remember to pick some up when I'm at the bike shop. Anyone ripped out their valve stem without a rim lock in place?

And when is some creative person going to make a new, lighter kind of rim lock?

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www.elineaccessories.com

I have the blue ones on my 06 TE450, light weight covered thread, very nice pieces. If you are talking about the schrader valve stem nuts, I always put the nut up against my valve cap, I use metal caps either MilSpec aircraft type or aluminum caps so if the valve fails it wont leak air, and I leave the stem to float, (the tubes always shift a little bit). When they slip I just deflate and shift back to straight up position. That is robertaccio's technique. others chime in.

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www.elineaccessories.com

I have the blue ones on my 06 TE450, light weight covered thread, very nice pieces. If you are talking about the schrader valve stem nuts, I always put the nut up against my valve cap, I use metal caps either MilSpec aircraft type or aluminum caps so if the valve fails it wont leak air, and I leave the stem to float, (the tubes always shift a little bit). When they slip I just deflate and shift back to straight up position. That is robertaccio's technique. others chime in.

I preload mine the other way so that when they do slip they go straight first. It gives you a little more leeway.

My old XR had a slotted valve stem hole with and oval grommet sealing the rim. allowed for a lot of slippage before damage.

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I ripped a fair number of tubes on my DRZ w/o rimlocks.... in fact, I never got past 2 rides on a tube w/o a flat. I HATED that bike.....

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Dale good logic, I do that one on the kids bike and on my Mtn Bike, as they have no rim locks. Good move for sure because there is always a little slippage.

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I never seem to remember to pick some up when I'm at the bike shop. Anyone ripped out their valve stem without a rim lock in place?

And when is some creative person going to make a new, lighter kind of rim lock?

Don't know about the lighter rim locks but just recieved the Motion Pro rim locks from the TT store - going to but a second rim lock in both wheels. Did measure the stock rim locks - 4oz rear 2.5oz front.

Thanks Ride!

.

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Don't know about the lighter rim locks but just recieved the Motion Pro rim locks from the TT store - going to but a second rim lock in both wheels. Did measure the stock rim locks - 4oz rear 2.5oz front.

Thanks Ride!

.

I haven't seen 2 rimlocks on anything but a trials bike. Or my old Bultaco Alpina.

Just keep em tight and maybe preload them and enlongate the hole.

Thoughts from Uptite would be welcomed.

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I also wanted to go the double rimlock way, I figured double the tire retention & better balanced wheels, but my dealer (Who's been riding for years) told me you also double the chances of a pinch flat :censored:

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I haven't seen 2 rimlocks on anything but a trials bike.

:ride:

Well I do have trials tires on the bike...

Its to balance the wheels, that and a very good friend has had multiple flats on the freeway at high speed - with 1 rim lock and with 2 rim locks. 2 rim locks no problem, 1 rim lock was a problem :censored:

.

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I use a washer come spacer that has a curve that locates to the curve of the rim,it fits under the rim lock and allows more touque on the nut and constant presure around the curcumforance,unlike stock that only touchs the rim in 2 places,They come from a company called Fasst.

And this is with a Mitas trials tyre= no stip,the washers are cheap as chips.

www.fasstco.com

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Always use a rimlock offroad/mx. Two rimlocks will keep a flat tire on a rim LONG after a one-rimlock setup has left the tire around your swingarm! For you roadgoing TE guys, just use tapeweight and balance the rim. I've done it for years for highspeed iceriding with great results, makes a big difference in highspeed vibration resulting in more traction/less fatigue. Duct tape over them roadracer-style and they'll stay put. It's gotta be better for your rear shock/linkage as well. Put your bike on a stand and run her in 6th with a unbalanced rimlock wheel and watch how much it hops, its alot! The benefits are much less at low speed.

Pinchflats don't seem to happen with any more frequency at a rimlock, from my experience.

The Honda rubber bushing is THE BEST setup, use it in place of a valvestem nut. I like to preload my valvestems like Dale does.:censored:

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Always use a rimlock offroad/mx. Two rimlocks will keep a flat tire on a rim LONG after a one-rimlock setup has left the tire around your swingarm! For you roadgoing TE guys, just use tapeweight and balance the rim. I've done it for years for highspeed iceriding with great results, makes a big difference in highspeed vibration resulting in more traction/less fatigue. Duct tape over them roadracer-style and they'll stay put. It's gotta be better for your rear shock/linkage as well. Put your bike on a stand and run her in 6th with a unbalanced rimlock wheel and watch how much it hops, its alot! The benefits are much less at low speed.

Pinchflats don't seem to happen with any more frequency at a rimlock, from my experience.

The Honda rubber bushing is THE BEST setup, use it in place of a valvestem nut. I like to preload my valvestems like Dale does.:censored:

Balancing the tires was the best thing to happen to my suspension - took 80% of the harshness out at anything above 15mph.

What is this bushing of which you speak? Info? link? pic?

Which way do you preload? If mine slips (rarely) it is in the braking direction...

DSC_0654Small.jpg

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Balancing the tires was the best thing to happen to my suspension - took 80% of the harshness out at anything above 15mph.

What is this bushing of which you speak? Info? link? pic?

Which way do you preload? If mine slips (rarely) it is in the braking direction...

DSC_0654Small.jpg

Coffee,

With the stem ( rear ) at 6:00 or at the bottom tilt it towards 11:00 or toward the motor. Same with the front or away from the motor.

This is for acceleration slippage. When you get hard on the throttle causing the tire to spin slippage occure when the tire hooks up and gains traction.

I can't recall my stems ever slipping in the braking direction.

Set it up to your style. I think there is more force transmitted in acceleration/hook-up than in braking....for me anyway.

But then I accelerate more that I brake :censored:

By the way. What's your balancing technique?

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I'm definitely intrigued by Coffee's balancing technique:applause:

The only slippage that I have ever noticed has been in the direction of accelleration (610:p) on the rear wheel, and in the direction of braking on the front wheel.

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Coffee,

With the stem ( rear ) at 6:00 or at the bottom tilt it towards 11:00 or toward the motor. Same with the front or away from the motor.

This is for acceleration slippage. When you get hard on the throttle causing the tire to spin slippage occure when the tire hooks up and gains traction.

I can't recall my stems ever slipping in the braking direction.

Set it up to your style. I think there is more force transmitted in acceleration/hook-up than in braking....for me anyway.

But then I accelerate more that I brake :censored:

By the way. What's your balancing technique?

DSC_0660Small.jpg

DSC_0653Small.jpg

$10?

With trials tires front and back they rotate in the braking direction, at least the front does since it does not have 2wd. Actually since I got the carb tuned up the way I like the back tire / tube keeps rotating back and forth a little bit - kind of interesting actually.

Going down these types of hills in bone dry conditions is what I am taking about:

IMGP1466.jpg

.

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DSC_0660Small.jpg

DSC_0653Small.jpg

$10?

With trials tires front and back they rotate in the braking direction, at least the front does since it does not have 2wd. Actually since I got the carb tuned up the way I like the back tire / tube keeps rotating back and forth a little bit - kind of interesting actually.

Going down these types of hills in bone dry conditions is what I am taking about:

IMGP1466.jpg

.

$10????

True for the front wheel. My bike has less that 500 miles on it and after 60 or so miles in the South Jersey Pines I noticed that the rim locks were not real tight and thats the way the front slid ( acceleration side). I adjusted them and they havn't moved since.

I forgot to check the rim locks as part of my initial new bike set up routine and they were both not very tight luckily I caught it before rippin a tube.

Those downhills would be definately a challange to accelerate down.

We obviously have different needs for our riding styles and preferances. The only downhills similiar to that that I encounter usually have a hell of alot of rocks or tree roots and ruts so going fast enough to lock the rear wheel ( definately not what you want ) rarely happens at great speeds.

Ah the Cotes balancer. I just sold one not long age as part of a package of inventory I bought from a bank I do business with as inventory of a Jiffy Lube they forclosed on. Didn't even think of the MC application at the time. But I do know where to get some time on one.

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If you not planning on riding on your flat for any distance, there is an altternative to Rim Locks. Sheet metal screws in each side of the rim. Holds tire in place and can be quickly removed to change flat tire on one side. Old Enduro/Six Days trick from 70s to speed up tire/tube changes:ride: .

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That's quite a balancer, coffee. Is it in your local garage? Do they let you use it at your leisure? :applause:

Are those some of the hills you frequent?

I sure am in a questioning type of mood.

/nag

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That's quite a balancer, coffee. Is it right in your own garage? :applause:

Are those some of the hills you frequent?

I sure am in a questioning type of mood.

A small shop opened in our town and they have big dreams. Hope they make it. They are bright people with open minds that seem to listen to logical thought - when I first went there they looked like any other cycle shop - lots of Alpine star stuff.... They have tweaked there inventory and are now the only shop that carries the pressure suit that I choose, might get SG10s, etc - basically upscale stuff. That balancer is in his garage at his house, but he plans to move it to the shop when there is room after an expansion. Like I said - big dreams.

Yes those are the hills. I don't go up that particular hill but others do as you can see. It is hard as concrete in the summer. For reference those trees in the distance are something like 10 to 20' tall. Going there in the morning in fact and see how my kids bike does there. Heres another pic:

IMGP1468.jpg

.

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Some people call that place "Carnagie" (emphasis carnage) instead of its correct name Carnegie. Fun place during the weekdays, weekend = quadtard central.

A small shop opened in our town and they have big dreams. Hope they make it. They are bright people with open minds that seem to listen to logical thought - when I first went there they looked like any other cycle shop - lots of Alpine star stuff.... They have tweaked there inventory and are now the only shop that carries the pressure suit that I choose, might get SG10s, etc - basically upscale stuff. That balancer is in his garage at his house, but he plans to move it to the shop when there is room after an expansion. Like I said - big dreams.

Yes those are the hills. I don't go up that particular hill but others do as you can see. It is hard as concrete in the summer. For reference those trees in the distance are something like 10 to 20' tall. Going there in the morning in fact and see how my kids bike does there. Heres another pic:

IMGP1468.jpg

.

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