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How to break in a 2007 Husky TE450?

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Well I should be picking up my bike in another couple weeks (it's on order right now). I'm just wondering what is the best way to break the bike in (engine, suspension, transmission, etc.)? Can I ride it on the roads during break in? and if so how fast can I go without doing damage to anything like the engine valves, etc.?

the other thing I was wondering is when do you need to do the first service on this bike? I know I know... ask the dealer some will say, but I honestly trust fellow Husky owners with the same bike more, I can see people on this forum really know their stuff and love their Husky's. and what does the typical first service cost?

Thanks all!

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Well, I'll tell you what I did. I have a ranch with some trails of my own. The same thing could be done at any decent off-road riding area. First I checked all the bolts and nuts. Then I rode it all over the place making it do every thing it was capable of without breaking about 6k. Lots of shifting. Lots of braking. No sustained speeds or any one gear for any measurable time at all. Constantly up and down. Had a blast. I did this for three hours. During this period I watched the nuts and bolts. Nothing came loose.

Then I changed the oil/filter and cleaned all the screens.

Next I did the same thing for another six hours. But occaisionally I reved it to 8k for very short periods in between shits. After a couple hours I did this a few more times. A couple more hours and I took it to 9k a couple three (four) times. Drained the oil, changed the filter and cleaned the screens again. Still no loose bolts.

At present I have 18 hours on it and am considering changing the oil again. If it comes out really clean and the screens look good I will run it a few more hours between oil changes next time. If the oil looks dark I will shorten the interval.

I'm also about to take the rear linkage apart and check the grease. This will tell me how to deal with that service interval. Head bearing has grease squeezing out a tad so I'm presently not worried about that.

Valves: My big concern at present. Never done it before but need to get in there and look. :censored:

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Next I did the same thing for another six hours. But occaisionally I reved it to 8k for very short periods in between shits. After a couple hours I did this a few more times.

I don't care who ya are.... that's funny right der! :applause:

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I'd start off by doing 10 or so cold starts before riding it. Let it idle up to running temp. Then (after the 10 cold starts) I'd start riding it. When I got mine it was tight and rough and liked to heat up fast. After 8 or 10 cold starts it was a lot better. Also, during the first few hundred miles, change the oil, change the oil, change the oil, and.... um, change the oil.

BTW somewhere between 300 and 400 miles mine seemed to smooth out some and increase in power. I liked it a lot before. I like it a lot more now. It's a great engine and just gets better.

Also, do a search on this forum for other peoples opinions on break in. And check the manual. You can download it online now from Husky and read it. There are comments about the first few hours (4 or 8) like don't do full load and Change The Oil.

Besides that, it's going to be the typical breaking in common sense stuff and your school of thought.

stringer

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Well here is how I broke mine in.

I picked it up at the dealer and took a quick ride in the parking lot after warming it up. Couple of passes, a few wheelies, a few full throttle bursts.

Brought it home and took a couple short rides just like the above, only in my alleys around my house. Letting it cool completely down between rides. Then I rode it around my hood a little, over to some small hills and trails, keeping it moving, not letting it overheat, letting it cool off every 20 minutes or so. At 2 hrs on the clock, I changed the oil and filter, cleaned the screens and loaded her up for a weekend ride on the trails where they held the RedBull last man standing event. Rode it all day saturday and most of Sunday, just like I plan to ride it all the time. Have almost 10 hrs on it now and plan to change the oil and filter and clean the screens again at 10 hrs.

This bike is SWEET!

I didnt find anything on the bike I need to change yet, except for adding a heat shield to the header area before the muffler where it melts your pants/boots :applause:

I LOVE the one finger clutch, MONSTER torque right from the bottom, AWSOME suspension and massive acceleration!

I hope my riding buddies DONT buy one! They will be eating my roost regularly now :applause:

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Break In”, rings & bore finishes and “Heat Cycles”.

Piston rings have a "end gap" to allow for heat expansion. Common “end gap” spec is about .0035” (three & one half thousands of an inch) for every inch of bore. A 450-500cc dirt bike is roughly 4" bore so about .013" is needed. IF too tight the ring expands with heat, the ends butt together and with no place to go the ring will bend which it can only do if it expands the groove in the piston, thus the piston, break the ring etc.

Back in the dark ages cylinders where hone quite coarse lets say a 100 grit hone (same rating as sandpaper) to help break the rings in.

This caused the ring to shed some metal which opened up the end gap. Lets speculate that in a car set at .013” within 10,000 miles was up to .018” maybe .020”, as parts got smoother the rate of wear decreased but if .030” was wear tolerance we where ½ worn out as soon as it was broken in. A statement and old timer made recently was in the ‘50’s an engine was ready for rings at 25,000 miles!

So a technician wanting to do a better job sets the end gap at .010” knowing full well that the safe gap was still .013"! Then he either did or instructed the customer to do a series of “heat cycles”. The goal here was to start the engine;

1: Run it for maybe 1 minute, then let it completely cool down.

2: Run it for maybe 1.5 minutes, then let it completely cool down.

3: Run it for maybe 2 minutes, then let it completely cool down.

4: Run it for maybe 5 minutes, then let it completely cool down.

Object here is to shear off material so the ring gets up to that .013” safe spec before it gets enough heat applied to it to cause the ring to expand and close that gap and get into the danger zone of the “end butt”.

In the ‘70’s in pursuit of fuel efficiency manufactures wanted to reduce the friction of those coarse hone jobs. Among the refinements driven by low friction is ring manufacturers now “hone the ring” in a factory fixture so they are 90% broken in when delivered to the engine manufacturer and today the same engine shop would probably be finishing with a 500 grit hone.

So today the need for break in is very minimal, there are those who preach “ride it like you stole it” there is a web site where they talk about how you have to apply a load to the engine to get it to break in (pressure applied at the combustion chamber pushes down on the ring so its at the bottom of its groove, gets behind the ring and pushes it out against the bore. With the ultra smooth surfaces their theory would be if the bore becomes glazed before the rings become seated in and the engine never achieves its full ring seal.

The question we don’t know the answer to is “how much end gap does it have”. The engine manufacturer can not afford to check the end gap on every ring so he tells the ring manufacturer what the bore size is going to be, checks some early production pieces and if they are coming out say .012” to .014” they turn up the assembly line, if out of that spec they tell the ring maker to change his spec but there is always a chance that some will get assembled a bit tight. This happened recently to one of the big 5 and with a certain model if they where broken in without excessive heat build up all was fine. But those that subscribed to the ride it like you stole it theory found themselves with a broken ring.

The compromise between the various “Break In” theories can be;

We want to avoid excessive heat buildup, avoid like the plague tight grid lock trails, go ride a logging road or something where you can maintain a brisk pace to keep a good flow of wind thru the radiators.

Don’t be afraid to apply some power for a brisk shot of acceleration, but avoid long uphill climbs where the power is applied for several seconds at a time

Don’t be afraid of RPM, its heat that we are trying to avoid

The engine manufacturer chose an oil for break in, it should be rune for several hours before changing, avoid an instant change to a full synthetic oil as that can inhibit break in.

Avoid running “Lean” fuel mixtures, richer mixtures run cooler. Bikes that are known to be too lean should be rejetted before they are run if possable.

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IMHO modern motors are very well setup and made from some pretty nice materials. I'm from the ride it like you stole it group because I believe you need to put pressure on the ring right away. The ring to bore mating is important and only happens in the first few miles. Rings seal but combustion pressure forcing them out and onto the cylinder walls. By riding it hard from the get go you force the ring to seal and mate with the cylinder wall. I have been riding pretty much non stop for 30 years and have NEVER broke a ring or had an engine blow up on me. Every new bike I have bought in the last 10 years has been run hard from day one. They have always remained reliable and run strong. In addition to this I have had several engine builders tell me the same thing.

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

All that said I'm not advocating you do this it is just my feelings on the subject. Others have success with the long easy breaking ritual as well. You do what you feel is right for your bike. Run quality dino oil for the first few hundred miles and keep your filters clean.

- this subject is much like "which oil is best" as there are several opinions and several approaches that work fine.

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IMHO modern motors are very well setup and made from some pretty nice materials. I'm from the ride it like you stole it group because I believe you need to put pressure on the ring right away. The ring to bore mating is important and only happens in the first few miles. Rings seal but combustion pressure forcing them out and onto the cylinder walls. By riding it hard from the get go you force the ring to seal and mate with the cylinder wall. I have been riding pretty much non stop for 30 years and have NEVER broke a ring or had an engine blow up on me. Every new bike I have bought in the last 10 years has been run hard from day one. They have always remained reliable and run strong. In addition to this I have had several engine builders tell me the same thing.

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

All that said I'm not advocating you do this it is just my feelings on the subject. Others have success with the long easy breaking ritual as well. You do what you feel is right for your bike. Run quality dino oil for the first few hundred miles and keep your filters clean.

- this subject is much like "which oil is best" as there are several opinions and several approaches that work fine.

I 98% agree, however if you did that on a 2005 KTM 450EXC which came with too little end gap) it would have broken a ring in the first 5 miles. Pressure without sustained heat build up works under both theories

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The engine manufacturer chose an oil for break in, it should be rune for several hours before changing

Excellent post. In your opinion what is several hours?

For the record I broke in similar to what you describe - and changed at 2 hours & 20 miles.

For that matter - do you know what that stuff is that comes from the factory? It looks like no "oil" I have ever seen.

.

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Break In”, rings & bore finishes and “Heat Cycles”.

The engine manufacturer chose an oil for break in, it should be rune for several hours before changing

The 06 TE manual says to change the oil after the first 3 hours for the "full power (stop removed) mode. Page 282.

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I read those articles, very interesting, I have always been a "slow long easy break-in" guy because that's what manuals and most mechanics have told me to do. But after reading that article, it definately seems to make more sense to apply pressure right away to seat the ring properly. I guess when I pick up my new 2007 TE450 next week, I am going to drive it home on the roads from the dealer (about 15 miles). I think I should probably do bursts of hard exceleration (high rpms) on the road and then deceleration by just letting off the throttle (no brakes, use engine braking instead). After the 10-15 miles it takes to get home I think the engine should be broken in and the rings sealed properly. Also, excessive heat build-up shouldn't be a problem because I will be riding on the roads and should be doing about 45mph or so..

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I read those articles, very interesting, I have always been a "slow long easy break-in" guy because that's what manuals and most mechanics have told me to do. But after reading that article, it definately seems to make more sense to apply pressure right away to seat the ring properly. I guess when I pick up my new 2007 TE450 next week, I am going to drive it home on the roads from the dealer (about 15 miles). I think I should probably do bursts of hard exceleration (high rpms) on the road and then deceleration by just letting off the throttle (no brakes, use engine braking instead). After the 10-15 miles it takes to get home I think the engine should be broken in and the rings sealed properly. Also, excessive heat build-up shouldn't be a problem because I will be riding on the roads and should be doing about 45mph or so..

I take these articles with a grain of salt. For one thing, the engines are designed by engineers who pick the materials, and specify the clearences. There is a tendency to assume that all engines were designed the same way, as if the rules were set as law and that's just the way it's done. Nothing could be further from the truth.

If I were you, I would ask myself, "Who knows the requirments better? The Person who designed the motor in question and tested it and is now responsible for it meeting claims or the 'other guy' who has an opinion about all engines but no responsibility? Who's going to pay for it if you void your warrenty and screw your engine up?"

The sticker on tail on my TE450 says to take it easy for the first 4 hours. Is that realy a lot to ask? Your spending $$$$ on the bike, why take a chance for 4 hour time?

My 2 cents.

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my bike shop told me to just ride the bike like I would ride it normally, don't worry about any sort of break it, if I want to ride it hard, do it, just don't go overboard and abuse it. The service man there DID tell me though that he notices people who ride their bikes hard right from brand new tend to have FASTER and more powerful motors then people who break their motors in slowly. This would go hand in hand with the article in the link above.

Oh and the service guy also told me that Husky ships these bikes with a FULL SYNTHETIC oil in them as brand new. That article says that full synthetic in a brand new engine is not a good thing because the rings won't get fully seated... but again, who knows, everybody has their own take on how to break in an engine I guess...

I would assume these engines are designed to last a VERY LONG time no matter how you break it in..

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my bike shop told me to just ride the bike like I would ride it normally, don't worry about any sort of break it, if I want to ride it hard, do it, just don't go overboard and abuse it. The service man there DID tell me though that he notices people who ride their bikes hard right from brand new tend to have FASTER and more powerful motors then people who break their motors in slowly. This would go hand in hand with the article in the link above.

Oh and the service guy also told me that Husky ships these bikes with a FULL SYNTHETIC oil in them as brand new. That article says that full synthetic in a brand new engine is not a good thing because the rings won't get fully seated... but again, who knows, everybody has their own take on how to break in an engine I guess...

I would assume these engines are designed to last a VERY LONG time no matter how you break it in..

Of coarse they would tell you that. 1) Again, the guy that sells you the bike is not an engineer, or an expert in metallurgy. Does he know the temperature and time for the rings to lose hardness or anneal? Yes, seating the rings is a large part of breaking in motor. But you need to do it withour ruining the rings through local excessive frictional heat. Also, most cams need some early TLC also. 2) Does he realy care? Worst case for him is he'll get to sell you a new bike sooner.

Look, I'm not saying all sales and sevice people are malicious. They do realy belive they know. But the guy that wrote the manual, asked the engineer who KNOWS what to put in the manual. He calculated it. He measured it. He tested it. He knows. His job relies on him being right. And if, anybody comes up with an engine that does not need break in, they'd advertise it. It's a selling point. Problem is, physics gets in the way. (BTW in the 80's (?) Nissan did just that. But they stopped saying no breakin because of ring problems. Some of the cars started burning oil at around 20,000 miles as I recall.)

Sorry to get on a soap box but I AM an engineer. And I know what it's like to have field service personel and even customers tell me how my design works when they don't have a clue. They think they know.... But they don't. And the result is expensive at best. A typical senario would be a part that should last for 10 years lasting an few months because a field sevice engineer told that customer that "alignment is not importent" or "Just ignore the warning in the manual about oiling it. I do this to all of them." (The material has lower friction without oil, and oil causes it to swell and then fail in a week.)

Trust your engineer. Read the manual and look at the sticker on the rear fender (or under the seat on some.) It's only 4 hours for gosh sakes. After that throw the bones and do whatever the latest religious breakin flavor of the month is. And have fun.

Okay. Rants over. I'm putting soap box away now.

Stringer

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I hear you, 4 hours isn't a long time, but that article says the first few MINUTES are the most important to seat the rings properly to the full 360 degrees of the cylinder bore. So if you go easy for the first hour or so, then the rings won't seat properly... again, just conflicting stuff...

I don't know what the hell I will do for breakin now.. lol... my head i spinning...

all I know is that I will HAVE to break it in on the road because I don't have any trails around me right now to ride (still snow covered and really muddy at best).

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I hear you, 4 hours isn't a long time, but that article says the first few MINUTES are the most important to seat the rings properly to the full 360 degrees of the cylinder bore. So if you go easy for the first hour or so, then the rings won't seat properly... again, just conflicting stuff...

Who wrote the article? What are his qualifications? Did you check them or are the claims BS? Does he reimburse you for the cost of a rebuild if you start burning oil after 20 hours. Does he lose anything at all if he’s wrong? You do! Did he try his method on a Husky TE450?

As far as after the 4 hrs…. Do what you want. I, personally, went for it. I went to a dry lake bed and ran it up and down in speed for about three hours to get to know the bike. As an engineer my guess is that the first four hrs are so the rings don’t over heat due to friction and lose their hardness and also for the cam. If the rings do overheat, they’ll wear fast and you’ll burn a lot of oil mid engine life. Like I said before, the engine was tight at first. It also changes a lot during the first 300 miles. (Well, mine did.) So I know that things are still working in.

I do understand that you may be racing the bike and you may be changing the piston, cylinder and rings every 40 hrs or so. If that’s the case, it’s really not going to mater much anyway.

BTW Evinrude (sp?) IS advertising a new line of motor that does not need any breaking at all.

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I'm not an engineer.... so forgive any mistakes I may put out here. I've read that Mototune article and have often wondered about it. It seems to be saying that at higher revs your combustion pressure goes up. How much is my question.... Piston velocity is certainly going up... and with a certain amount of valve overlap the higher combustion pressures that might be seen are shorter in duration than at lower rpms..... and next, how does any of this fit in with lined cylinders?

My guess is for race motors this might be ok... I know the AMA Superbike teams do the heat cycle/ dyno thing.... they also have tons of money to pull their motors apart as wanted or needed.

Just some musings,

Dennis

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I'm not an engineer.... so forgive any mistakes I may put out here. I've read that Mototune article and have often wondered about it. It seems to be saying that at higher revs your combustion pressure goes up. How much is my question.... Piston velocity is certainly going up... and with a certain amount of valve overlap the higher combustion pressures that might be seen are shorter in duration than at lower rpms..... and next, how does any of this fit in with lined cylinders?

My guess is for race motors this might be ok... I know the AMA Superbike teams do the heat cycle/ dyno thing.... they also have tons of money to pull their motors apart as wanted or needed.

Just some musings,

Dennis

As I see it, I'd be worried about local heat generation at the rings. The faster they move, the more heat they generate. But the heat dissipation does not go up to match. So they get hotter if they move faster.

In the 06 TE450 manual on page 94 there is a paragraph on "Runnin in" They even break the breakin to before and after the first half hour. (Low speeds or 'revs' only for the first half hour and slightly higher revs after that.) So it does seem that they are worried about the rings. And it does seem that some hard thought and hard data went into the manual as this does not sound to me like a boiler plate paragraph. (I tried to cut and past the a piece of the PDF in here but it didn't work.)

At least in cars, a race engine is (or used to be) toleranced as if the car has 100,000 miles on it, then raced a few times, and re-built. The rings were unlikely to get hot. (They started out loose.) And if they did loose hardness…. who cares. They'd get changed out before they wore out. I bet the same holds true for the AMA Superbike engines.

Also, I'd like to know how many people have ruined there new bikes or cars by breaking them in per the manufacturer's recommendations? (I mean besides Nissan.)

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Lot's of good points made here.

Like I said, this is a lot like oil discussions. In the end how many of us have had issues with any bike of any brand not lasting long or blowing up because we did not break it in right? I know a guy on this board whom entered the nastest mud race you can imagine on a brand new YZ250 last year, overheated it and ran the piss out of it and it runs very well to this day. Having never really had a catastrophic engine failure in about 30 years of riding I think oil and brake in procedures may have little affect in the big picture. Just random thoughts, carry on. :applause:

- Oh, and about what the manual says... that thing is full of errors and translation issues. Pictures showing the oil screen in the wrong way, messed up instructions for setting the OD and wrong oil specs / levels. I glanced over it and then took care of the bike like I do all the rest.

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