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2001 CR250 power valve cleaning help

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I may have a stuck/gummed up power valve, and I'm looking for some help cleaning it. I have a shop manual ordered, and should be here soon, but I want to fix my ill running CR NOW....LOL

I Googled 2001 CR250 power valve, but didnt have much luck. Can anyone point me in the right direction? I saw the diagram on TT parts fisch, but need step by step type instuctions......or, is it simple, and I should just "dig in"? Thanks in advance.

Chris

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To do it right you have to take the whole thing apart & clean every part, lubricate, and put back together. Its slightly complicated. A quick fix is, take off your power-valve cover and Drain a whole can of brake cleaner spraying it off. Then, spray some WD 40 to lubricate things. DONT START YOUR BIKE YET!! Put the PV cover back on only finger tight though. Drain your oil. Dump a whole quart of oil in. KEEP THE KILL SWITCH PRESSED AND KICK IT OVER 10 times, DONT START IT. Drain oil,&repeat except, use 28 ounces and actually start your bike this time.Once warmed up, kill it, pull PV cover back off,start

it back up, rap the throttle & see if your pv is working well. If so, put pv cover on for good, drain & replace oil again. Your good to go. 30 min tops (most of the time is spent waiting on oil to drain) .Go buy a gallon of Shell Rotella 15/40 oil its great stuff $10 a gallon.. Good luck hope this helped you..

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Dissasemble the CRV assembly and clean everything piece by piece. I just did this..I used a tooth brush and brake cleaner to cut all the gunk off. On all the linkage rods, make sure you properly apply the honda moly paste to them so everything seals up good.

The manual wont walk you through cleaning it so you might as well dig in

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Dude, after reading all your posts, you really need to start tearing down you bike & fix it right. It's gonna take a little time & patience but WELL WORTH IT.

tear down

clean powervalve

jet it right

regrease all bearings

repack your silencer....

Hows top end?

Hows clutch plates?

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I will be going through the bearings and everything in a few weeks (after the ice is gone). I wanted to get a bike so I could be on the ice with my 7 year old daughter (just starting to get the hang of her RM65 on the ice). The top end is ok for now, the clutch is good. I know what you mean, I WILL go through everything, I just need to get a few rides out of this beast while the ice is here. If the the bearings in this bike cant take a few rides....I dont want it....LOL Thanks for the help guys. I'm leaving for Mexico this Friday, not sure if I'll get to the PV before that or not.

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Wrote this a while back for another person but it should still help. This deals mainly with the exhaust valve and not so much the other intricacies of doing the top end...

To remove the exhaust valve components first start with the bolt on the RH side on the top that needs to be removed. Remove the exhaust valve cover on the right side to expose the linkage cavity. Next look in the exhaust valve linkage cavity and remove the cotter pin on the vertical shaft. There should also be a (allen head) cap screw located just below the cotter pin that needs to be loosened so that the vertical shaft (crow’s foot actuator rod) will slide out of the bottom (base) of the cylinder.

The linkage will also have a (allen head) cap screw that fastens it to the right side drum valve (there is one on each side along with an associated bearing); remove this cap screw and the associated parts (linkage, drum valve, bearing, etc.).

On the left side of the cylinder remove the 17mm cap. There is a snap ring that holds the LH drum valve (bearing, etc.) in, remove the snap ring and all associated parts. As you pull the drum valves out there will be two rods that pass through the center of the exhaust flapper valve located in the exhaust port. Remove the rods (with the drum valves) and the exhaust flapper valve (through the exhaust port).

After all the exhaust valve pieces are removed you can clean/de-carbonize them. Carb cleaner, degreaser, ect. can be used. You’ll want to get them as close to spotless as you can and if you want to take the time you can polish them for even smoother operation.

Installation is the reverse of removal.

One thing I do near the end when reinstalling the crows foot actuator arm is to slide it up just far enough that the top of the arm will barely be captured by the (allen head) cap screw/pinch bolt and leave the cotter pin to the side. This will leave the crow’s foot portion hanging slightly below the base of the cylinder (3/8-1/2" is good) but it’s okay for now and will make reinstalling the cylinder easier. The crow’s foot needs to align with a pin on the case and it’s hard to see the engagement of the two.

Many people don’t pay attention and end up smashing the crow’s foot which causes the exhaust valve to bind and be inoperable. A replacement crow’s foot actuator arm is about a $65 bill as well. Once you've lowered the cylinder on to the cases and verified engagement of the actuator arms then you can loosen the cap screw, drop the cylinder and reinstall the cotter pin.

After installing the exhaust valve and the cylinder you'll need to adjust the exhaust valve. All adjustments will be made on the right side of the cylinder through the PV cover.

Make sure the PV is operating smoothly before attempting to adjust it. If operation is not smooth fix it first and then adjust it. To set the exhaust valve linkage first loosen the (allen head) socket bolt on the right that attaches to the crow’s foot actuator arm. With this allen head bolt slightly loose (leave your allen head wrench in the bolt) grab the linkage on the left that attaches to the PV drum (called the valve lever) and rotate it CCW until it stops. This will ensure that that the exhaust valve is in the full closed position. While holding the valve lever in the fully closed position rotate (with your allen wrench) the socket bolt slightly CW (when looking down at it) until you’ve achieved a clearance of 0.020” between the left spring end and the pinion arm (the thing that the spring ends rest on) and then tighten the socket bolt.

This might be hard to understand, sorry. It’s best to guess, tighten and then check it with the feeler gauge. If you’re off then keep trying, it’s pretty much hit and miss unless you have 3 arms.

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Wow, thanks for the post Faded. Bike is running better, but I still need to go through the PV (and the whole bike).

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