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Say What, Impossible?

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Ok so I had my Can-Am out in my yard, in the snow yesterday, and I wasnt cracking on the throttle, ( didnt wanna end up on my ass, snow = no traction) the engine was runnign at a low rpm. So being a 2-Stroke the plug fouled. so today I pulled the plug and cleaned it up, adn the bike fired, but at idel it would just die, and wouldnt start again unless i pulled the plug, and dried it. so it kept starting, dieing, I kept pulling the plug, drying it and putting it back in. So here's the weird part, one itme, I pulled off the plug wire, lossened the plug with my socket, than started backing it off with my fingers, suddenly flame shot out from the plug barrel and it made a fizzing sound as the fuel burned. WEIRD How did the fuel ignite if the plug wire wasnt connected and the engine wasnt turning to creat the energy needed to creat spark, and the spark plug was 3/4s of the way out of the barrel. im assuming that the air coming throught the barrel, made the correct air/fuel ratio to ignite, adn somehow the plug still had some energy trapped in it or something whacked like that. Any imput?

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Is the air real dry out? I think it is more likley static then left over power.. that is not possible in a spark plug

but that would freak me out LOL

why is your plug wet? Oh fuel I get it.. I think sorry rookie here with a 4 stroke :applause:

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Sounds like ghosts, what Id do is just keep it revved a little bit and not let it idle if youre racing mx but if trails then set your idle higher. My 125 doesnt idle but thats because I dont want it too, mx bikes dont need an idle.

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Is the air real dry out? I think it is more likley static then left over power.. that is not possible in a spark plug

but that would freak me out LOL

why is your plug wet? Oh fuel I get it.. I think sorry rookie here with a 4 stroke :applause:

Well its winter, so yes, the air is really dry. Could have been static, that was also one of my guess's, and yes, wet from fuel

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If the bike's been sitting for awhile durring the winter I'll bet the crankcase is full of fuel. This could cause this problem.

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the engine was runnign at a low rpm. So being a 2-Stroke the plug fouled.

It never fails to irritate me to read mis-information like this. Contrary to popular belief, a 2 stroke motor can, once tuned properly, operate at low rpms without fouling plugs. :applause: Lets get this urban legend corrected once and for all so people will stop blaming the 2 stroke engine for their plug fouling woes.

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hells yea :applause:. I have a '98 yz and it's never fouled a plug! :lol:

Ditto that with my '94 CR250 :applause:

And your combustion was caused by static electricity.

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Sounds like ghosts, what Id do is just keep it revved a little bit and not let it idle if youre racing mx but if trails then set your idle higher. My 125 doesnt idle but thats because I dont want it too, mx bikes dont need an idle.

am i missing something here? why would you NOT want your bike to idle?

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Ditto that with my '94 CR250 :applause:

And your combustion was caused by static electricity.

Maybe it's just the old bikes :applause: . They just don't make them these days like they used to...:lol:

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Maybe it's just the old bikes :applause: . They just don't make them these days like they used to...:applause:

That would be easy to believe! But really, if a bike is jetted and maintained correctly it won't be fouling plugs. It's just a matter of getting it dialed in.

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am i missing something here? why would you NOT want your bike to idle?

2 strokes at idle typically don't fire every stroke, sometimes on smaller 2 strokes if they're set to idle they can build up a charge and fire when you don't want 'em to. Like going into a corner just before an apex and you're about to get back on the gas. It can be unpredictable and it detracts slightly from what little engine braking they've got.

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It never fails to irritate me to read mis-information like this. Contrary to popular belief, a 2 stroke motor can, once tuned properly, operate at low rpms without fouling plugs. :applause: Lets get this urban legend corrected once and for all so people will stop blaming the 2 stroke engine for their plug fouling woes.

Chill out man, I love 2-strokes, let me re-phrase it than, like 99.9% of 2 strokes, the plug fouled. jeez, its a 2-Strokes sometimes (rarly) foul plugs. Plus i think i added a little too much oil to my mix, which added to it. Not everyone's professional when it comes to getting the carb set just right, so it'll never foul a plug.

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2 strokes at idle typically don't fire every stroke, sometimes on smaller 2 strokes if they're set to idle they can build up a charge and fire when you don't want 'em to. Like going into a corner just before an apex and you're about to get back on the gas. It can be unpredictable and it detracts slightly from what little engine braking they've got.

so what you're saying is that, often, you only want the rear wheel turning the engine over as you're coming into a corner?

i've never owned a 2-stroke so i'm honestly asking...not trying to be smart here...

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so what you're saying is that, often, you only want the rear wheel turning the engine over as you're coming into a corner?

i've never owned a 2-stroke so i'm honestly asking...not trying to be smart here...

Any time you're off the gas the back wheel's turning the engine but if you're racing a 125 you're either WOF or completely shut down. If you're off the gas then you're on the brakes and pushing traction to the limit, the last thing you want is an unpredictable variable. Some 2 strokes don't fire at all on the way down the revs until they reach "idle" speed but I've found some go "ping-ga-ding-ding" well above idle and can't seem to be tuned any different.

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