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The rod shows little or no wear. The bearing itsself looks OK. The crankpin is the culprit here. It has, as you can see, a nasty groove worn in it..crappy metal? doubt it.

Insufficient oiling? who knows...

The good news is my junk is all back in one piece, new motor top to bottom.. and now I can get rid of the damn thing

100_3243.jpg

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That is a very interesting picture.....

As you say, the conrod and the bearings themselves look pretty good. It would be very surprising that a lack of oil would manifest as showing all the damage on to one part of pin/bearing/rod though.....

I'd say the only way that could happen is if the pin is substandard material. All three of those pieces should be "similar" in grade steel yes...? So even if it lets go...why would all the damage just show up at the pin.

Bad pin.. I bet if you had a pice of that analyzed it would show as being an incorrect grade of steel.

But I'm just a biologist, what do I know..? :applause:

PRelHacko'

AFM # 97

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After seeing that Whip, makes me wonder if the same company that makes the pins also makes the rods.................. they probably heat treat them (harden them). The guy that is in charge of hardening is obviously as busy at work as Homer Simpson is :applause: :applause:

my friend's was the rod that went first and then worked on the bearing cage and rollers.

IMG_0137.jpg

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The rod shows little or no wear. The bearing itsself looks OK. The crankpin is the culprit here. It has, as you can see, a nasty groove worn in it..crappy metal? doubt it.

Insufficient oiling? who knows...

The good news is my junk is all back in one piece, new motor top to bottom.. and now I can get rid of the damn thing

100_3243.jpg

The rod,bearings and pin that I gave to the Suzuki rep last year looked exactly like that one and the groove went aout 1/3 -1/2 of the way around the pin. Like dejavu man !

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The rod,bearings and pin that I gave to the Suzuki rep last year looked exactly like that one and the groove went aout 1/3 -1/2 of the way around the pin. Like dejavu man !

That is also exactly the same as mine. JBrown118's looked the same also. Both bikes are '06 models.

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If you care to find out, have someone measure hardness. Low hardness could result in what you've seen, even with premium grade steel.

Not just anyone can do the test. It takes someone that heat treats to measure it appropriately.

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Many machine shops have them-its called a Rockwell tester. Hardness isn't the only factor,toughness of the steel is also an important part of the equation.

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Interesting. Seems like an open shut case Suzuki. Last year some owners reported Kawi 450's having wrist pin failures and Kawi owned up to it.

I will say this, I will not hesitate to rebuild this thing. It's by far the most confidence inspiring bike I've ever owned. If I have to rebuild, then sell, then buy a new one...that's a lot of money wasted. Also, I defintely will not do a "pre-emptive" sell because I think the motor might go.

As far as what's sitting in my garage, curious if anyone thinks it's possible to avoid engine damage at the first sign of metal flaking and then doing a rebuild. I'm guessing shutting it down at the first sign of any weird noises and/or being diligent about checking my oil filter for metal pieces? The long term bike in Dirt Rider seems it went one ride too long (especially for a Pro).

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Don't think that you will be able to detect a problem. My bike (the bike that the horribly grooved crankpin pictured above came from) never made a sound or acted wierd at all until the last time I rode it, when it started making a very faint tapping. It was even hard to tell wether it was valve train noise or not

To look at the crankpin from my motor, you may think it would have sounded like someone was beating the crank with a sledgehammer. It didn't. It was hardly detectable, and by then the whole motor was junk, it was already all junk.

So bad news: by the time you hear any unusual tapping in your motor it is already too late.

The only thing you can do that may halp you out is to cut open and closely examine your oil filter every time, it will show sparkly metal long before you hear anything

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another thing to consider: don't wait for your bike to blow up. If you have a good amount of time on your bike, tear it down and rebuild the crank before it trashes your jug, top end, oil pumps, head, etc. at Ronayers.com you can get the bearing, pin, rod and gaskets for a couple hundred. it costs a lot more once everything else gets trashed

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Don't think that you will be able to detect a problem. My bike (the bike that the horribly grooved crankpin pictured above came from) never made a sound or acted wierd at all until the last time I rode it, when it started making a very faint tapping. It was even hard to tell wether it was valve train noise or not

To look at the crankpin from my motor, you may think it would have sounded like someone was beating the crank with a sledgehammer. It didn't. It was hardly detectable, and by then the whole motor was junk, it was already all junk.

So bad news: by the time you hear any unusual tapping in your motor it is already too late.

The only thing you can do that may halp you out is to cut open and closely examine your oil filter every time, it will show sparkly metal long before you hear anything

:applause: The filter will show you whats going on better than anything else. Just make sure you cut out a section and squeeze it in a vise before trying to look at it, you will see everything thats in it much clearer that way. And like he said, if you catch it early....... you can go after it before the hard pieces tear up the cylinder and oil pumps! Heck if you're a worrier, you could end up replacing the cases too because of the area the oil pump gears ride against. $$$$$$$$$$!

peace

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