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Diesel Truck - 10 min trips

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I'm thinking of buying a truck either a Ford F250 or Dodge/Chevy 2500 Crew Cab. My main question regards diesel vs gas. I want to get a diesel truck but want some of your opinions. I work 10 minutes from my house and most of my trips are about 10 minute drives. I live in the north state of CA and the winters are relatively mild high 30's to low 40's at nights. Nevertheless, my current car often does not even reach operating temperature and I'll be at work turning the motor off. Do you guys know if this type of driving will cause premature wear in the turbo unit or the diesel motor overall? Am I better off getting a gas truck? I do not pull heavy loads that often. Thanks.

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Run the block heater every morning. I have mine on a timer.

You should let it warm up. Unless you do any major hauling, I would settle for a gas.

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No heavy hauling and short commutes? Don't get the diesel.

I just traded my 6.0 gas 2500HD for a new 2500 HD diesel. It tows SO much better, and gets a lot better mileage ON THE HIGHWAY. Around town, the difference is less. If you want to see good mileage, you really have to soft foot the throttle. You like to hear the turbo sing? Mileage won't be too good.

The diesel has monster torque, and will pull hills with much less drama, especially with a heavy trailer. But, that being said, my 6.0 felt quicker stoplight to stoplight. Sounded better too.

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I'm thinking of buying a truck either a Ford F250 or Dodge/Chevy 2500 Crew Cab. My main question regards diesel vs gas. I want to get a diesel truck but want some of your opinions. I work 10 minutes from my house and most of my trips are about 10 minute drives. I live in the north state of CA and the winters are relatively mild high 30's to low 40's at nights. Nevertheless, my current car often does not even reach operating temperature and I'll be at work turning the motor off. Do you guys know if this type of driving will cause premature wear in the turbo unit or the diesel motor overall? Am I better off getting a gas truck? I do not pull heavy loads that often. Thanks.

How heavy of loads do you plan on hauling? If it's 5000 lbs or under, the 2500 series would be overkill.

A 10 minute drive is actually harder on a diesel than many think-they never get a chance to reach operating temps, and they don't burn all thier fuel completely, thus diluting the oil. There is a myriad of other issues with using diesels for short trips.

Starts at 30-40F should not be a problem, even unplugged.

I'd go for a gasser, for the amount of miles you say you drive, you'd have to own this truck for 20+ years before it pays off in fuel savings.

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I am/was in the same situation. Work 15 minutes from my house. I traded in my 99 F-250 5.4L (gas) for a Chevy 2500 with the Duramax. I do pull a trailer once a month sometime twice. I am in a much colder climate and plug the truck in when it drops below 32. I take it in for service to the dealer I bought it from (they are suprising really good). I have asked the mechanics numerous times about my short commutes and they never made it seem like I was doing anything wrong. Then again they may want me to blow it up so I have to buy a new one! I use a Bully Dog power programer and I saw a noticeable fuel increas. I was doing around 17 mpg in town prior to the programmer now I am getting around 19 - thats good enough for me. On the highway I have a heavy foot and the turbo does a bit of screaming so its no where near what I get in town. With my trailer and 3 track bikes I do about 15-15.5 at 65 mph. Way WAY better then the Ford.

My mechanic recommended running Automatic Tran Fluid once every 10 tanks to help lubricate the motor - anyone ever hear this? I know thats the big ticket with bio-diesel its a much better lubricant so its supposedly better for the engine.

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My mechanic recommended running Automatic Tran Fluid once every 10 tanks to help lubricate the motor - anyone ever hear this? I know thats the big ticket with bio-diesel its a much better lubricant so its supposedly better for the engine.

I do the ATF trick on my diesels, but they are non-emmissions motors (no cats)-I have read that ATF may possibly not be healthy for the catalytic convertors. When I change fuel filters I fill them with ATF, then install them (older canister types)

The refineries are supposed to be adding lubricity packages into the ULSD fuel, but we all know how that goes.

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I do the ATF trick on my diesels, but they are non-emmissions motors (no cats)-I have read that ATF may possibly not be healthy for the catalytic convertors. When I change fuel filters I fill them with ATF, then install them (older canister types)

The refineries are supposed to be adding lubricity packages into the ULSD fuel, but we all know how that goes.

Interesting - I will bring this up to my mech next time I see him. FWIW my pickup is an 04 with the cat - when I was young I used to run stright pipes but now I am married with kids and that equates to me being old and boring!

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A better choice of oil to add to a diesel is 2 troke oil. This oil is designed to be burned, and leaves no residue behind. I have been using this in my Dmax since the switch to ULSD.

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My understanding of the lubrication needed is as follows :

There are two forms of lubrication - one is a viscous layer whereas the other is a lubrication that happens when things go "metal to metal" (boundary lubrication) - given that the high pressures that the fuel injection operates (in excess of 25000 psi) - what is needed is protection at these high pressures. So what may look like a lubricant at first glance provides absolutely nothing in this domain.

The additives that are used in ulsd, and in better diesel fuel additives, are organo-metallic compounds that bind to the metal and provide this metal to metal high pressure protection. Two stroke oil and atf may or may not provide this protection - I do know that stanadyne lubricity formula does. I use this in every tankful of fuel.

The oil companies are adding the same additive to their fuels - but it may not be enough. The fuel injector manufacturers wanted a more stringent lubricity specification than what eventually was adopted into the current ulsd fuel specification (450 micron wsd versus 520 micron wsd). One more reason to add a little more lubricity to the mix until they pull their heads out of their collective arses.

jeff

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My two cents:

1. If you never tow, go gas.

2. A 250 will ride rough and bounce down the wonderful freeway expansion joints and any other bump you hit unless it is loaded to the t*ts or you've got a significant trailer behind it.

3. A 150 is way less heavy duty, and sprung for a nice ride. Good for "light" trailer towing, home depot runs...

4. Get a 4 door.

5. Get a long bed too (if you can) if you don't mind parking way out and making wide turns in parking lots. Then you can haul 4x8 plywood and all kinds of stuff will fit in it with the tailgate up and you don't have to worry about it falling out.

6. Enjoy whatever you buy!

P.S. I have a Dodge diesel. I tow a 30' toyhauler.

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Greetings friends. My very first post. I own an 06' Chevy with the D/A combo. I would trade it for nothing. However, in your shoes I would definitely buy a gas truck. I would buy a 3/4 ton if you want one. Mine rides fine. Just expect it to ride like a truck. No such thing as a cheap truck that is good on gas. Regards.

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The heaviest item I tow is a 30 foot trailer weighing about 9000 lbs loaded. Nevertheless, I only tow it twice a year. After the snow melts in the spring, I tow it to my property in the mountains. I use it until late fall and tow it back home before it snows. Everything else I tow is less than 5000 lbs. I probably will just get a gas 2 1/2 ton for simplicity. Thanks for the response.

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The heaviest item I tow is a 30 foot trailer weighing about 9000 lbs loaded. Nevertheless, I only tow it twice a year. After the snow melts in the spring, I tow it to my property in the mountains. I use it until late fall and tow it back home before it snows. Everything else I tow is less than 5000 lbs. I probably will just get a gas 2 1/2 ton for simplicity. Thanks for the response.

For that limited amount of use, it'd probably be worth it to rent a Med duty truck like a large U-haul or similar, and purchase a light duty PU for a daily driver.

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