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Stationary Hops

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So I've finally mastered dead stop balancing. I can do it pretty much indefinitely. :applause: I found the trick was: :applause:

01) DO NOT use your body/peg weighting to try to balance use your arms and handlebars (thanx to the Ryan Young video for that tip.)

02) And something I figured out was that standing up straight with as little bend to the knees makes it MUCH easier.

So sweet. I can stand and balance now. My next step is to try to bounce the front around and stay balanced. I do the low knee dip bounce without pulling on the handlebars -- and:

01) The front doesn't bounce that high if at all (though it does if i'm moving) (I have been suspicious for awhile that my rebound valve adjuster is seized up internally -- but I have yet to take the forks apart)

02) Keeping my balance is near impossible even when i get a small hop.

So 2PLY do you have any slow-mo video of doing a stationary front wheel bounce? Anyone else have suggestions?

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So I've finally mastered dead stop balancing. I can do it pretty much indefinitely. :applause: I found the trick was: :applause:

01) DO NOT use your body/peg weighting to try to balance use your arms and handlebars (thanx to the Ryan Young video for that tip.)

02) And something I figured out was that standing up straight with as little bend to the knees makes it MUCH easier.

So sweet. I can stand and balance now. My next step is to try to bounce the front around and stay balanced. I do the low knee dip bounce without pulling on the handlebars -- and:

01) The front doesn't bounce that high if at all (though it does if i'm moving) (I have been suspicious for awhile that my rebound valve adjuster is seized up internally -- but I have yet to take the forks apart)

02) Keeping my balance is near impossible even when i get a small hop.

So 2PLY do you have any slow-mo video of doing a stationary front wheel bounce? Anyone else have suggestions?

The Trials Training Center Web Site has some very good video examples of front and rear wheel hops with a good text explanation too. Be sure to watch the video clips.

http://www.trialstrainingcenter.com/html/hopping.html

With the rear brake locked, a little clutch friction (slight engagement of the clutch) on the up bounce will help. The bike will turn in the direction that you tip it so don't stand with your legs tight to the bike, stand similar to how you stand in a slight turn.

If you are hopping and turning left, tip the bike left on the way up and then tip it a little to the right on the way down.

You don't need the help from the clutch and you don't need the motor. Just be aware that it can be used. Also, the tipping action left or right is very slight, if you are not looking for it in the videos, you might miss it.

.

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So I've finally mastered dead stop balancing. I can do it pretty much indefinitely. :thumbsup: I found the trick was: :ride:

01) DO NOT use your body/peg weighting to try to balance use your arms and handlebars (thanx to the Ryan Young video for that tip.)

02) And something I figured out was that standing up straight with as little bend to the knees makes it MUCH easier.

So sweet. I can stand and balance now. My next step is to try to bounce the front around and stay balanced. I do the low knee dip bounce without pulling on the handlebars -- and:

01) The front doesn't bounce that high if at all (though it does if i'm moving) (I have been suspicious for awhile that my rebound valve adjuster is seized up internally -- but I have yet to take the forks apart)

02) Keeping my balance is near impossible even when i get a small hop.

So 2PLY do you have any slow-mo video of doing a stationary front wheel bounce? Anyone else have suggestions?

Well micahp, it sounds like you were about where I am now. Got the balancing using either pegs or handlebars, but it is taking longer than I thought to learn to hop! I have the drop and back motion, easily can pop the front up a few inches - once- but I am unable to do more than once.

At first I wasn't standing on the brake hard enough(Ryan Young means it when he says stand on it as hard as you can) and when I added more pressure I quit driving the bike backwards. I have been just bouncing the suspension OK but when I start lifting the wheel I have to stop and get my balance. When I can get outside I will get the front wheel elevated a little and Im sure that will help. Other ideas?

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I want to second 2PLY. The videos at trialstrainingcenter.com are a must. Getting the front wheel off the ground is a momentum transfer problem. You can't just lean forward and then pull back. It is more of a knee dipping movement getting the whole body moving. Not an intuitive movement.

John

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here,here, ive been working on it too,and takes the balancing to a new level just when i thought i had it down,but slight clutch drag makes it much easier,as well as body english.can you imagine how many hours of practice it took the pros to get to where their at!not to mention how many times they ate shit?you never see that.another thing ive been working on is hopping the back wheel.

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So I've finally mastered dead stop balancing. I can do it pretty much indefinitely. :thumbsup:

You really think so? It is very easy.... in the gararge!! I bet you can even do it with no hands. Now go out and try it while riding, entirely different ball game. I've heard guy found the next step in developing balance was to learn to stop and then balance.

Let us know how you do with this.

I know the hopping looks cool and impresses the chicks, BUT, you guys really should learn how to turn!! I did an event this past weekend and the turns were so tight that it was almost easier to take a dab and swing the bike around. You'll find most guys that hop, still end up dabbing, as was the case this past weekend as I watched many experts do exactly this.

Turning is the foundation of trials, if you can turn, you'll win your events!!

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Can you imagine how many hours of practice it took the pros to get to where their at! Not to mention how many times they ate shit?

True, but also, not true. It is not generally appreciated that motorcycle riders at the top of their sport, and that includes trials, are world class athletes. Their balance, ability to control their body, mental focus, vision, spatial orientation, situational awareness, image processing, pain threshold, willingness to accept risk, etc., are in a completely different class. Unless you are a top athlete you can't extrapolate the amount of practice it would take you (or me) to learn something, to the amount of practice it takes Adam Raga. I could practice my entire life and not be able to do what he does. And I'll bet he picked it up real quick. Yes, he practiced real hard and fell a lot. But he probably got results a lot faster, too.

I went to Auburn in the '80's when Bo Jackson was there. I was in a video arcade playing Tempest when he came in. I don't think he'd played before because his first few rounds sucked. But after just a few quarters he had the high score. Not only was his body better than mine, his brain-body interface was better than mine.

Of course, that doesn't mean we shouldn't try. I don't expect to be competing at the expert level. Ever. But at the same time, I shouldn't compare myself to people who do. I spent years doing that in other areas of my life and was miserable. (I know, I'm off topic, but my fingers took over.)

Standing hops, hell, I can't even ride a wheelie yet, much less balance standing still. But I'll keep trying.

John

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You really think so? It is very easy.... in the gararge!! I bet you can even do it with no hands. Now go out and try it while riding, entirely different ball game. I've heard guy found the next step in developing balance was to learn to stop and then balance.

Let us know how you do with this.

I know the hopping looks cool and impresses the chicks

Point about turning well taken Frutta, but being thousands of miles from any organized trials event, my priorities are a little different. I may not have many chances to ride in an event, but I still am very interested in learning bike control while using trials practice to increase my balance and stamina. With three months of summer, most of my trials experience has been inside with motor off(I know, kinda pathetic) and yet I feel I have put this time to good use. I could sit around polishing my WR450 or I could get on trials bike and learn some of the fundamentals of trials riding. I actually think I have a bit of an advantage being forced to learn some fundamentals before I start getting out and having fun.

Balancing was priority one, hopping was yet one more thing that is an excellent stamina/conditioning exercise and something that can be learned inside. I have been using this for exercise all winter with the hopes that once I actually get to ride I will have increased my stamina enough to extend my ride time. And it has been a blast to exercise in such a fun way!

I know the forum is 'observed trials bikes' but since these are mostly 2-strokes in a thumper forum, I feel its OK to share this forum with non-competing, trials riders.

Keep those tips to us begginers coming, we appreciate both the experience and the willingness to share it! I'll keep practising hopping in case some chicks start hanging around the shop!:thumbsup:

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FYI, I'm not slapping you around. Any practice is better than none. I've spent time this winter doing the samething. Just know, stationary hops inside, especially on concrete are not that hard to master. If you unfortunate enought to still be stuck in the snow, vary up your inside practice. Pump up the tires, put you front wheel on an elevated step, Ok, try the back wheel up high ( much easier) try turning the front wheel while stationary. Practice taking one foot off the peg, (or one hand) and see how the bike reacts. How about balancing with the wheel pointed straight.

All of this will help when learning to hop. What gets really frustrating is once you can get the front or back wheel up, you can't regain balance!!

Quick story.. When we started riding trials, a former national mx champ would ride with us. Of course him and most of the guys would be looking for the biggest log or biggest ledge to ride up. This quickly got boring for him until he saw me practicing very tight turns and hitting obstacles from short distances. Then he was hooked!!! The sport became challenging.

Bottom line, if your riding inside or out and having fun, so be it!

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Practice taking one foot off the peg, (or one hand) and see how the bike reacts. How about balancing with the wheel pointed straight.

Bottom line, if your riding inside or out and having fun, so be it!

I believe I may have seen some videos from YZ125 of slow/tight turn practice-might that have been you on the bike? Good video.

Without elevating the front wheel I cannot yet balance with the wheel straight. I notice few of the pro riders in the videos spend much time with the wheel straight, appears that they setup with a slight angle, concentrate then straighten and launch.

Removing a foot has really helped me learn what 'loading the foot pegs' means. The more I balance the more I use the jamming the peg technique where as I never did at first. Im starting to let go of the bars, but I keep my hands pretty darn close to them.

The slow turn practice(the little I've done on ice) has really helped me learn clutch control. When you are practising slow/tight turns, what gear are you in? I had been grabbing 1st but a friend advised trying 2nd stating that it is less jerky.

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For the gears, 1st or 2nd is fine if your bike is geared down a little. Everyone prefers something else. It probably also isn't a bad idea practicing very tight turns in higher gears though, as you will sometimes have to do this in longer sections. I have just started to get the hang of doing the hopping, after going down to TN for the trials training days. I would take a vid and put it up, but my bike is with a mechanic getting some jetting bugs worked out of it.

For the balancing, once you get it with your front wheel in one direction, try it with the front wheel in the other direction. This is probably the most practical next-step.:thumbsup:

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For the balancing, once you get it with your front wheel in one direction, try it with the front wheel in the other direction. This is probably the most practical next-step.:thumbsup:

Yes, Ive gotten so I dont much care what direction I turn it to, but when I try to straighten it I usually end up flailing both directions for a second, recover and then try again. The only time I can keep it straight is when the front is about a foot off the ground- not sure I understand that principle. I was suprised when I raised the front way up close to balancing on the rear (with the front end loosely restrained) it seemed easier than I thought to balance.

Ive seen the video of you balancing sitting on your bike (I can do that with low air in rear), but sitting no hands is way off for me. I saw the recent videos of TTC showing one of the instructors balancing with only one foot, no hands- no danger of me ever doing that!

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For the balancing in both directions, I meant that more for in the sense that it is a very practical thing to learn for events, because often, you need to balance in a turn that is to your weak side. If you aren't doing many events though, I guess it isn't quite as important.

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ive been practicing hopping just for bling bling as its not needed until some advanced class sections and expert and i ride intermediate,but ive found that if you fill up your tires it makes the hopping easier for me

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I believe I may have seen some videos from YZ125 of slow/tight turn practice-might that have been you on the bike? Good video.

Without elevating the front wheel I cannot yet balance with the wheel straight. I notice few of the pro riders in the videos spend much time with the wheel straight, appears that they setup with a slight angle, concentrate then straighten and launch.

Removing a foot has really helped me learn what 'loading the foot pegs' means. The more I balance the more I use the jamming the peg technique where as I never did at first. Im starting to let go of the bars, but I keep my hands pretty darn close to them.

The slow turn practice(the little I've done on ice) has really helped me learn clutch control. When you are practising slow/tight turns, what gear are you in? I had been grabbing 1st but a friend advised trying 2nd stating that it is less jerky.

The video was good because it showed my arms were way out of position!

I know no one balances with the front wheel straight, because it is very difficult. But if your inside looking for a challenge...

Also, when hopping the front wheel, it should be straight.

When practicing slow turns, I use 1st gear. If it gets jerky, try dragging the rear brake. Another habit you should force yourself to learn.

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I got to see a lot of rear wheel hopping at the World Round in Tennessee this past weekend. It was wet on the second day and hopping - many of you probably already knew this but it was new to me - is how you get traction in difficult conditions. Say you're trying to climb a 45 degree boulder that is wet and muddy. You get on one wheel and hop! When you come back down hard on the rear tire you have much more force which gives you incredible traction. Take a look at the video my son put together and you'll see guys hopping up boulders, gassing it each time the weight comes down on the rear wheel. The really good ones could probably hop up a sheet of glass coated with oil.

John

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I got to see a lot of rear wheel hopping at the World Round in Tennessee this past weekend....................When you come back down hard on the rear tire you have much more force which gives you incredible traction............

John

Now you know why I've been telling people that a Pogo Stick can be really good training and conditioning for more advanced Trials Riding.

And now you know why I tell beginning riders that they can't really learn the fundamentals by watching the World Championship riders. They almost never turn the way we are supposed to turn while learning. They are masters at turning the traditional way, but some beginners see the hopping turns and try to use it before they have mastered the regular turn.

That was a great teaser video from your Son.. I hope he will have more soon. :eek:

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