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Last man standing....what happened to the one women rider?

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I watched the Last Man Standing last night and at the start they said one women was riding it and then never mentioned her again. Does anybody know what happened to her?

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I was thinking the same thing. I thought someone posted something in here a while back about it. She obviously did not make the second lap. BUt I too am curious to see how far she did get.

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They extended the time cut off to two hours, knight finished 24 min. before the second place guy...I would just like to see if she finished the first lap. I know I wouldn't have.

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Most of the riders got cut off before they were "done" either with the first lap or tired enough to quit. I know there was at least one woman (Maria Forsberg) and someone pointed out that another woman from Austria was entered. Here's the picture that I posted of Maria before:

Picture170.jpg

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I would have liked to see what happened to them also:excuseme: . I was a little disappointed in the coverage, but nonetheless a great race. Way too many commercials to show enough of the race. But sometimes that is what it takes for funding I guess. On another note Danica freakin rocksdrool2.gif. It is too bad she is out of the 12hr.

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Oh I agree!

I guess Jeff Fredette tried it once and won't go back... :applause: Hats off to anyone who even attempts it!!!

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There were serious issues with the weather (Snow in Texas?) so the course was worse then they even expected. And they didn't have qualifying so instead of 100 racers they had 160. This resulted in bottlenecks beyond belief. If you weren't in front to start with you were going to be buried behind all the other riders pushing, pulling and throwing their bikes over obstacles.

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A lot of the riders made it to check 1 but it was after the time limit was up so they aren't shown as making it there in the results.

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LoL listen at 43 seconds "that's a girl!" as she comes up that hill.

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I sure couldn't do that.......

The hubby and I were just talking about needing to do some trials type stuff......you know, as Velo says "wheelies with a purpose". (I think that was velo, right?) :applause:

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I sure couldn't do that.......

The hubby and I were just talking about needing to do some trials type stuff......you know, as Velo says "wheelies with a purpose". (I think that was velo, right?) :applause:

"wheelies with a purpose"

That sounds like a dirt bike community service group. :applause:

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you know, as Velo says "wheelies with a purpose". (I think that was velo, right?) :cry:

lol. that was me alright.

dang, i can no longer read anyone's posts in this forum without reflecting on the author's responses in the 'waxing' thread. :applause: Sheesh. bad mark :lol: . :applause: .

umm, anyway, most people tend to be a little skeptical about drills and practice. they just want to ride. but it's quite remarkable how much of a difference it can make spending even just a few minutes every ride isolating some small technique or skill, and practicing it w/o the distractions of everything else on the trail.

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lol. that was me alright.

dang, i can no longer read anyone's posts in this forum without reflecting on the author's responses in the 'waxing' thread. :applause: Sheesh. bad mark :lol: . :applause: .

umm, anyway, most people tend to be a little skeptical about drills and practice. they just want to ride. but it's quite remarkable how much of a difference it can make spending even just a few minutes every ride isolating some small technique or skill, and practicing it w/o the distractions of everything else on the trail.

Too funny....I think. Not sure what I wrote in the waxing thread...apparantly it was 'memorable'. :cry:

Any suggestions on drills? I seriously want to start working on some of those techniques. I REALLY want to get my kids going on them too. So any directions would be greatly appreciated.

The first and last time I 'tried' to wheelie.....I looped the bike and nearly ripped out my knee cap. So I have BIG fear issues to overcome......anywho....again, any direction would be MUCH appreciated.

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Any suggestions on drills? I seriously want to start working on some of those techniques. I REALLY want to get my kids going on them too. So any directions would be greatly appreciated.

The first and last time I 'tried' to wheelie.....I looped the bike and nearly ripped out my knee cap. So I have BIG fear issues to overcome......anywho....again, any direction would be MUCH appreciated.

well, hopefully jat250wr will chime in with her impressions. she was also pretty nervous about the whole wheelie thing. you can try to devise a drill for almost anything. try to figure out if there's something you're having a problem with, then isolate that skill into something as simple as possible, with as few other distractions as possible. the wheelie drill we did was sort of like this:

first, get used to using the clutch as a power-delivery tool, not as a 'let it out and go' thing. so we started by just tooling along in 1st or 2nd gear, pulling the clutch in, revving the engine a bit, and then letting the clutch enough to feel a little jolt of acceleration, then pulling it back in. 2 fingers stay on the clutch the whole time. we just kept getting more and more aggressive with this until the front wheel started just barely coming off the ground. we're not trying to get the front wheel way up in the air and do show off wheelies here, just get some control with the clutch and motor, and the ability to lift the fron wheel over reasonably sized trail obstacles instead of just plowing into them and hoping for the best. for most people it also helps to lean slightly back to get a bit more weight on the rear wheel for traction. timing-wise, it seems to be start with a little rev, then about 1/2 second later, let the clutch out and lean slightly back and pull up on the bars all at the same time. the clutch-out part might even be a few milliseconds before the lean back and pull up part, to allow the bike time to start moving forward and lightening itself before you add your input.

i think the key to this drill is to just try to get the wheel up a little bit. a few inches at first, maybe as high as a foot, and get a feel for how much rev and how much leaning back are required to get the wheel up that high. that's well within the range that if you simply pull the clutch back in the front wheel will come back down and you won't get anywhere near looping out. remember. keep two fingers on the clutch. it's just a shot of power to get the wheel up, not a let-it-out-forever scenario. probably a good idea to cover the rear brake too just in case you get way too frisky, but we didn't have any problems.

after a few mins of doing these around the parking lot, i got a bunch of rocks (a small 4-6" log would be better, but we were in the dez, so no logs to be had) and i built a line of small rocks maybe 4" high and a few feet wide. then we practiced rolling up that from each side and lifting the front wheel over it. the bike will easily ride over stuff like that no matter what you do, so it's mostly just a visual/tactile reference point to help you get the front wheel up at just the point you want to.

it's helpful to practice this on different surfaces and slightly different inclines too, to get an idea of how much harder you have to rev and lean back when the bike is on a slight downhilll, for example. or how much you have to get your weight back to get traction on loose surfaces. it's no fun to plan on getting the front wheel in the air, and have the back tire just spin so you plow straight into the obstacle. in this pic, i accidentally kicked the bike into neutral approaching the stack of logs at 10-12 mph, so when i revved it up and let the clutch out, exactly nothing happened, lol.

overbarssmall.jpg

we did another drill where we tried to make the tightest turn possible while standing. we just rode around a fire ring, alternating directions every now and then, trying to get the front wheel turned all the way to the steering stops.

next time we take the little kx100 out, i'll see if i can get her to do front-wheel-lifts from a stop. that is pretty handy sometimes in moab and idaho, when you're stopped with 1 foot down and there's an 18" ledge 6" in front of you. if you can just pop the front wheel up onto it, it's childs play to drag the back end up if it comes to that, but often you can just ride right over.

at lunch stops or around camp i'll often just play around riding over logs. start on something small and just keep going bigger. eventually you get up to riding over 14-18" logs with both feet on the pegs, keepin the bike nice and level all the way to the landing.

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