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Foul a plug... is it done.

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If you oil or carbon foul a plug is the overall reliability of the plug ruined?

I sometimes take a wire brush to them and put them in my camelback i case one dies.

My freind andrew was telling me that once a plug dies i should just pitch it.

Is this true? Is fouling a plug mean the end of its life?

Thanks alot.

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I just throw them away... Even if there not fouled after a certain amount of rides i just change them. I would rather pay $2 then be stuck with a bike that wont start. :applause:

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I reuse plugs all the time. My neighbor has a sandblaster that my spark plugs fit into PERFECTLY.

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They should be cleaned with one of those spark plug sandblast machines.Any carbon or build-up deep in the insulator could short out the spark.

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I just throw them away... Even if there not fouled after a certain amount of rides i just change them. I would rather pay $2 then be stuck with a bike that wont start. :applause:

I havent bought a 2 dollar spark plug in a long time..

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They should be cleaned with one of those spark plug sandblast machines.Any carbon or build-up deep in the insulator could short out the spark.

Who sell it I would like to have one Link?

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You can sometimes clean a sparkplug with a wire brush if you wet foul one, but if the electrode is worn you should just throw it out and replace it with a new one.

You should actually be changing your plugs fairly often. Even on a 4-stroke its a good idea to replace them at least every 20 hours.

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When I deal with snowmobiles...

If the spark plug is still visibly good but just fouled, I usually heat it up with propane torch and wire brush it, then heat it up again and brush it.

Then give it a little test in the plug wire and crank the engine over to see if it's sparking good then put it back in.

It's a matter of money, whether or not your a student working part time for almost minimum wage. I try and save up money for other stuff and try and save money wherever possible.

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If you foul one of those fine tip electrode plugs, they are usually junk afterwards. But the standard plugs can sometimes be salvaged.

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Yeah and plugs aren't cheap... 16 bucks for my 450.

He said oil and carbon fouling. Sounded like a 2 stroke to me which would use an inexpensive plug.

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If you oil or carbon foul a plug is the overall reliability of the plug ruined?

I sometimes take a wire brush to them and put them in my camelback i case one dies.

My freind andrew was telling me that once a plug dies i should just pitch it.

Is this true? Is fouling a plug mean the end of its life?

Thanks alot.

Several ways to fix a fouled plug. I mainly use a spark plug sand blaster. This works great. Or warm the end of the foul'd plug wi th a propane torch.

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I throw them away, but if I were to save them I think I would want it stored pretty securely in my pack, not just thrown in there. Consider the damage sand and grit getting stuck in the electrode could do when you reuse it.

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I find a sandblaster gets the best results, although you have to make sure no sand gets wedged inside of the plug. Contact cleaner or engine degreaser works good too.

The problem with using a propane torch or any other torch, is you must be carefull not to overheat the end, otherwize it will be junk.

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I've been reusing plugs forever. On the trail I carry a container of carb cleaner, wire brush and a scraping tool made from a piece of flattened, tempered wire. I spray carb cleaner in and on the plug, then wire brush it, now I fill the electrode cavity and use the scraper to remove all the carbon and other gunk that may have built up inside. Give it another last spray with the carb cleaner and voila, all clean inside and out. I also have some 220 wet or dry, folded and glued for stiffness, to renew the tip if necessary and one of those half-dollar sized gap gauges.

I can understand tossing a plug if the resistor or electrode goes south but just because it's dirty, fouled or old? I guess I'm too old school or something.

Dave

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The plug fouls when the carbon and or gas / oil bridges the gap between the center electrode and the side electrode through the insulator. Then the electricity just goes to ground through the carbon or liquid and does not jump the gap. The propane torch and brush will burn the carbon and or liquid back off and renew the plug. There is a limit though and if the center electrode gets rounded and worn, just toss it. For me it's the hassle of going to the store rather than just the heating with the torch and going back to riding. The $2 plug is a thing of the past.

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