Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Balancing tires

Recommended Posts

Stealer charged 39 bucks to balance 2 wheels i watched the guy do it if i had known it ws that easy i would have done it myself...... my next purchase is a balancing stand better yet mabye ill make my own :applause:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

$39 to static (I assume that is what was done) balance is a rip off. Had they removed the wheels, put them on a dynamic balancer, the cost would of been justified plus the end result would be significantly better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i walked the wheels in if they had to remove and install they would have charged a grand!:applause:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it is still a bit expensive. So they did do a dynamic balance - Put the wheels on a machine, spin, with the computer telling them where and how much weight to add? Or did they put the wheels in a stand, let the heavy part fall, add weight to the light part and call it a day (Static balance)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have to use a proper stand to balance your tires? I just installed a new front tire, could I just lift the front end off the ground and spin it on it's axel?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To do a good job of static balancing a tire, the wheel must be able to turn as frictionlessly as possible.

If you raise your bike, put a feather on the tire and that causes it to turn, then you can probaly do a good static balance on the bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does it really make a huge difference if the wheel is perfectly balanced? My average speed is 60 - 80 km/hr. I just figured that as long as my wheel isn't really heavy on one end then it wouldn't make a huge difference in ride or wear. Am I wrong? Just curious. Lot's to learn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, the accuracy of the balance matters as speed increases. Most dirt bikers never bother to balance the tire at all. Five minutes into the ride, the wheels are covered in mud and any balancing done is moot. 60~80 Km/hr a balance job on the bike to just get it close is more than adequate. Not a bad idea to attempt a rough balance when you add rim locks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of bike mechanics just had an argument over this on a local board. The one said only use dynamic balancing on your sportbike or you will die (a couple years experience) the other (~28 years experience) said it won't make a huge difference, and the factories, and well as the MotoGP race teams all do static balancing. Now keep in mind the amount of money motoGP teams have at their disposal, if dynamic balancing made a difference, they would likely do it, no?

I think I'm buying spoons and a balancing stand..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It may not make a big difference. It will be better. They USED to do static, now it is all done dynamically now that the machines are portable. How much better is factor of how well the wheel was made (was it balanced during the manufacturing process?), how well the tire was made and the intended top speed of use (a race tire? Z or higher rated?), care exercised during the installation of the tire and a few other details

Will you die if you only static balance? Of course not.

A wheel and a tire do not have a single heavy spot. They can have several, these spots can be in the center of the rim, or off to one side, basically anywhere.

I am an ex-factory rep from Yamaha with almost 40 years in my belt. I will always dynamically balance a street bike tire when possible. If I have no other choice, I will statically do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the aviation business we use the static balance method for balancing the nose wheels of corporate jets. There is a lot more at stake with a jet aircraft than with a bike. If dynamic balancing was any better, it would be the industry standard. The only advantage to using a dynamic balancer in a bike shop is that it might save them a little time, but it's not really any more accurate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Airplanes also use retreads, the life of a plane tire for the miles is tiny, the impact on landing, flatspots caused by the non moving tire on the passing pavement on landing and many other factors make the value of a dynamic balancing on a plane worthless, except maybe for the first take off.

Plane tires and motorcycle tires are not comprable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It may not make a big difference. It will be better. They USED to do static, now it is all done dynamically now that the machines are portable. How much better is factor of how well the wheel was made (was it balanced during the manufacturing process?), how well the tire was made and the intended top speed of use (a race tire? Z or higher rated?), care exercised during the installation of the tire and a few other details

Will you die if you only static balance? Of course not.

A wheel and a tire do not have a single heavy spot. They can have several, these spots can be in the center of the rim, or off to one side, basically anywhere.

I am an ex-factory rep from Yamaha with almost 40 years in my belt. I will always dynamically balance a street bike tire when possible. If I have no other choice, I will statically do it.

:applause: Thanks, its nice to hear another opinion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for a cheap static balance I have often used the backs of 2 chairs and the axle-learned this from a buddy. I first get the bearings clean and turning freely (you should do this every time the tire is off anyway) then keep adding weight (pennies taped on) until I cannot find the heavy spot anymore. A scale will tell you how much weight to add now that you know where to put it. I actually don't have a scale and just guess-timate the weight and cut old weights to size. Havent found it makes a huge difference on any bike. I have driven street bikes with wheels so out of balance that I could see daylight between tire and road in the shadow/silouette as it bounced along at high speed-havent died yet-(will someday for sure though).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, then the took advantage of you. A static or dynamic balance is worth at most, $15/wheel, more likely $10 each. Most shops I have been to charge between $30 and $35 to replace a tire (tube type, tubeless are cheaper) and dynamic balance a tire on the bike. It is lot more work to pull the wheel, swap tire and tube than to merely balance staticly two wheels. I am sorry to hear of your experience. Mark that dealer as one to avoid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a static balancer and use it on my street bikes and DRZ S I have had no balance issues I bought weights from dennis kirk it works very good

garage.php?do=viewattachment&attachmentid=36473

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I made a static balancer and use it on my street bikes and DRZ S I have had no balance issues I bought weights from dennis kirk it works very good

Yup, that is all you need to static balance, provided the wheel bearings are real smooth. Take that a step further, use precision frictionless bearings in the jig. Even with out the jig, you can do the same on the bike, just have to unbolt the caliper and remove the chain.:applause:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dynamic balancing is just plain faster.thats all.

if you have the time and proper stand with knife edge rollers,you can do the same thing.

go to a AMA supermoto or road race event and watch what the michelin or dunlop guys do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×