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trying to loose weight for racing

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Hey everyone! I just want to say that all of the infromation on this forum has been verry helpfull. I just have one question and any help would be greatly appricieated. I have recently started a diet plan about 3 weeks ago. I started out at 256 lbs and said enough is enough time to get into shape so I have limited myself to 1500 calories a day and have been sticking to it faithfully. I have also joined a gym and go 3-4 times a week. the question that I have is that in the first 3 weeks I have lost 15 lbs which is great but this week I weighed myself and I gained a lb I was wondering if this is normal, shoud I be eating less calories, also any tips and advice would be greatly appriciated thanks in advance.

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Good for you.... 15lbs is GREAT:applause: :applause: :applause:

I'm no expert, but the basic formula for weight loss is to burn more cals then you take in. Keep to your plan, and don't worry about your day to day weight loss, rather weigh yourself once a week, or every other week. Do it at the same time, say first thing in the morning, so the variables will be normailzed. You might also want to keep a journal of your excerise. This allows you to refect on your accomplishments over time; it's a motivater on those days you don't feel like working out. And make the switch to Silver Soda (Coors Lite) if you want to enjoy a beer!:lol:

andy t.

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You need to take in more than 1500 calories at your weight. I'm no expert but I am on the same journey as you I started at 314 and am down to 280. I did the same thing at the start I ate about 1100 to 1500 cals a day and loss alot of weight the first few weeks. Then I got a trainer and he told me if your body does not have enough fuel it will eat at lean muscle mass. He set me up on a diet plan at about 2500 cals a day and it has been great. I am losing about 1 to 2 pounds a week. Hit the weights hard and lots of cardio and it will come off. Good luck. Most of the weight in the first couple of weeks is water weight.

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like everyones else said, i am no expert but i do compete is sports where weight is critical (muay thai and mma). the gaining one pound back is most likely water weight. you will always fluctuate here and there while losing. for instance i may cut 15+ pounds in 2 days (water weight) and be back to my previous weight the next day (rehydrating). as for long term weight loss everyone is different but a diet high in quaity protein (fish,poultry,whey,soy) with complex carbs (brown rice, high fiber bread) and alot of veggies works prety well. i know some guys around the gym use a calorie intake of 10 calorie per pound the want to weigh. like someone comming down to 200 punds would target 2000 calories perday. also try to split meals into a large breakfast (eggwhites,oatmeal,grapefruit etc.) and then have 4-5 small meals throughout the day. it helps your metabolism run on high and keeps you from long periods of not eating which cause you to get hungry and over eat. i pesonally fill up on protein and veggies before i dive into my carbs because they are much lower is calories (usually) and you can eat more. no matter what though make sure you get alot of protein because when your losing 5 pounds a week some of that has got to be muscle. and lastly i know beer is tastey and refreshing and people will argue the point that you can lose weight and still drink but trust me, just leave it alone until you get where you want to be. every beer is an extra 100-200 calories and alcohol is not an efficiant energy source for your body. i hope that helped, im not a expert but it works for me. good luck and keep us posted on your progress man.

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thanks everyone I may try to up my intake to 2000 calories a day then. I find 1500 calories really easy so 2000 should be a brease. I guess I am kind of an all or nothing person and may have been cutting my calories too much. I really appriciate the help. Oh I don't drink verry often mabyee once a month so beer isn't a concern.... but pepsi is lol I have already cut out all of the regular pepsi and went to diet and am fazing the diet out gradually and trying to drink more water... thanks again and I am open for as many tips as I can get.

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I like everyone else, cannot say that I'm an expert on the matter. However I played football 7 years, ran track, race MX, so on and so forth. Being in shape is critical for my life style, both weight and strength wise. Red Robbie's trainer is right, along with a most everyone else on this thread. 1500 Calories is too extreme for an active person. You will lose weight but also drive and energy. Your body needs calories to burn for energy, and thats what promotes weight loss. However cutting back tomuch is not a good thing. Example being if you were taking in 3000 and you cut back to 1500, your body has half of what its used to having to make energy. To make up for the lost calories your body cuts back your metabalism to counteract this harsh drop in calorie intake. So inturn you actually burn calories slower, making weight loss harder. DONT DRINK SODA, drink water, juice, tea, etc.... Eat a big healthy breakfast, oatmeal, eggs, etc.... and cut back the fast food to a EMERGENCY meal. Also eat 4-5 small meals a day, aim for about 2000-2300 calories, and dont eat past 7 p.m. if you are on a normal shedule. Keep active and you lose weight slow and steady, and in a healthy way.

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I upped my calorie intake to 2000 a day now ... and to be honest I am finding it hard because I am used to eating 1500 a day. But I guess that's a good thing. I weighed in today and I am down to 238 any tips on what exercises are best? Right now I am doing at least 30 minutes on the eliptical machine and I work a different body part each night .... how many reps and sets should I be doing on the weights???

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Best thing I ever did for losing weight and getting in shape for riding is getting a road bicycle. Start out gradually, and work your way up to an hour at least every other day. As time goes by you will see an improvement (as long as you maintain a good diet), and you'll probably want to ride even more. It's just getting over that hurdle of the first month or so. IMO way more enjoyable than an indoor trainer. As far as weights, stick with a weight where you can do the repetitions with good form. You may even want to speak with a trainer, as everyones body responds differently to working out. You have to find out what works best for you.

My wife is a certified instructor with ACE, and she suggests one of the following to increase your weight loss:

Increase the frequency of your workouts

Increase the duration of your workouts

Increase the intensity of your workouts

Also, don't skip a good healthy breakfast, and eat small meals frequently throughout the day.

Stick with a program that works for you, and you'll get the results you want.

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Every week I lift Chest, Arms, Shoulder/Back, Legs in differnet nights, and I alternate from one week doing 4 sets of 5, and the next 4 sets of 10.

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i ate 1500 cals a day for month, lost weight like crazy then quit losing weight. now i try eat more and work out more. been running for 45 mintues everyday and can't lose any weight. having lost any for 3 weeks now, &%$#@!?

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I think the key is to not "try" to lose weight. It's a lifestyle shift that usually gets results. I highly suggest reading a book by Paul Chek, called "Eat, move, and be healthy" ....or something like that. He trains top X games athletes, and his approach is sound. It's not a diet. Run away from anything that resembles a diet....you'll only go "off" of it.

The basic premise of his book is that we're not al the same, and we can't be expected to follow cookie cutter formulas to get results. It's good stuff.

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Try not to worry about small/quick fluctuations in weight like that. Same goes for small/day deviations in your diet plan. Better to view things on longer time scales both in body weight and dietary intakes. It is much easier to think of these things on a weekly basis long term than day to day or meal to meal. Quick/small weight fluctuations can be attrubuted to hydration status. Being up or down one pint of water will change your body weight one pound. You are only concerned with fat loss or gain so no worries on day to day body fluid fluctuations. Man, keep it up and good luck!

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i have been hard at this exact same thing for the last 5 weeks since returning home from my first test in the UK . i fly out for the first round of the british supermoto championships wednesday week :naughty::lol:

when i was there testing i was 97 kg {213pounds} at around 8% bodyfat , i now weigh in at 84 kg {184 pounds} it is a lot of work but well worth it . would have been much easier if i had to just burn off fat but i had to burn off a lot of muscle ,but i did it by diet and training

diet

1/ 4 x eggwhites , 1 x yoke , 1 tomato ,2 x slices of turkey , water and a black coffee .

30 min stationary bike . 45-60 min gym taining every thing no less than 20 reps , grouping chest/shoulders , arms/calves , legs then repeat {sundays off}

home from the gym , on my push bike 1 hour of road riding aound 30-35 km

2/ 150 grams of chicken, half a lettuce ,1 tomato , 2 mini cucumbers , a piece of fruit and a large water

3/ snack mixed nus and black coffee

4/ as 2

on pushbike 1-1 1/2 hours on the bike 40-45 k

5/ 150 grams of beef or tuna with 2 cups of mixed vegies {no potoes} and 1 piece of fuit

6/ snack mixed nuts and black coffee

i have eaten like this 7 days a week trained 6 days a week and it has worked a treat , not only am i the lightest i have been in 14 years i am also the fittest :applause::lol: :lol: :eek:

the diet was the hardest as i am used to eating a lot of food , so have been hungry and tied but now feel great for it , just my brand new custom leathers are now to big :worthy:

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i fly out for the first round of the british supermoto championships wednesday week
Best of luck, Shane.

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Well 7 pounds equal one horsepower, so just think how much faster your bike will be!

My other 2 cents. If you wake up and then work out, you need to eat alittle first to kickstart your metabolism. Like a piece of toast, 1/2 an apple and maybe an egg. Then after you workout, have a decent breakfast.

Also for the guy dieting and running for 45 minutes and not losing weight, muscle weighs more then fat, don't get caught up in the numbers too much, body fat percentage is a much more realistic gauge. You can do calipers, get water tested or even a basic scale that used an estimated bodyfat. It doesn't have to be super accurate, just as long as you have a rough estimate and then keep using that method as you go down the path.

Also, like it has been said, vary your routines. The body is made to adapt.

You quit eating and lose weight fast, then the body readjusts and slows down the metabolism and you quit losing weight. Feed the machine 5 times a day, every 3 hours or so, small meals, you won't get hungry, it tells the body that food is plenty and it kicks the metabolism up.

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i ate 1500 cals a day for month, lost weight like crazy then quit losing weight. now i try eat more and work out more. been running for 45 mintues everyday and can't lose any weight. having lost any for 3 weeks now, &%$#@!?

Your body adjusts to whatever stresses you throw at it, whether it's fewer calories or more miles run or whatever.

You hit plateaus and won't see any improvement.

That means you have to INCREASE the intensity of what you're doing. And also vary/change what you're doing. Change your routine, add some new exercises, etc.

Your training should always progress over time, changing with your goals, peak races (or whatever athletic event you're pursuing).

You cannot, however, improve forever constantly. You build up to a peak, then back off for a while, then start again with a new goal.

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Your body adjusts to whatever stresses you throw at it, whether it's fewer calories or more miles run or whatever.

You hit plateaus and won't see any improvement.

l.

That's not correct at all in regards to strength or wt loss and it's part of why so many people have so many problems.

You are correct in that the body adjusts to stresses such as strength training and when you hit a plateau you then CAN increase the load to get past the plateau, back off for a week, or you can change exercises and come back to that one in 4-6 weeks. If however, the plateau is just too much and is in fact a symptom of overtraining, that plateau can NEVER be overcome because it is just too much for the body to handle.

As for wt loss, increasing intensity won't do much for the most part if you have lost alot and then stop because the body has reached homeostasis which is what 99% of the diet and fitness industry does not understand. When you are losing wt your body sees this as starvation and wants to maintain its CURRENT homeostasis.

To try and maintain the current wt while you are trying to lose weight, the body does this by adjusting metabolism which it does more specifically by adjusting hormone levels such as cortisone, t3, leptin, etc. No amount of intensity is going to bring those hormone levels back up or change them.

You CAN further increase the calorie deficit to get more wt loss by exercising more and/or eating even less, but as most have found, this soon leads to a start of chronic tiredness and overtraining as the hormones mentioned above are also responsible for proper RECOVERY as well as maintaining your immune system.

If you are already at 1500 calories/day and have stopped losing wt and are tired and/or sore all the time it's time to take a couple weeks off from the calorie deprivation to allow hormone levels to come back up to normal. You will still want to workout the same and you will gain a little wt back, but when you diet again, you will be able to go lower than you were before.

Ideally, the problem which enables these hormones to drop is because people diet too hard to try and lose wt too fast. You should really have no more than a 500 calorie deficit/day with a couple of cheat days in there if you want to maintain normal hormonal levels. This is about 2500 calorie deficit/week which is about 1/2lb wt loss at most which is all you should expect.

It's slow, but consistent and you are far less likely to hit a plateau, which has the added benefit that you won't be sick or tired or sore all the time, either.

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1500 calories a day and heavy training is wrong. You've hit a plateau and your body thinks it's starving. You might want to schedule an appointment with a personal trainer and get some recommended training routines, diet (as in "what you eat") advice and so on.

Check the yellow pages or a local health club. It's worth the $$$.

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I think the key is to not "try" to lose weight. It's a lifestyle shift that usually gets results. I highly suggest reading a book by Paul Chek, called "Eat, move, and be healthy" ....or something like that. He trains top X games athletes, and his approach is sound. It's not a diet. Run away from anything that resembles a diet....you'll only go "off" of it.

The basic premise of his book is that we're not al the same, and we can't be expected to follow cookie cutter formulas to get results. It's good stuff.

BCS is on the money, I went to Cheks San Diego clinic a pretty fit 54 y.o. vet class racer. He looked at me from 50ft away and said I was 2lb heavier on my left hand side. He weighed me and was dead-on. I was convinced he knew his stuff.

I followed Cheks eating/training theories and went from 183lb to 168lb in five weeks without losing any strength, in fact my weights improved. My skinfolds are now like a 15 year old. Some of Cheks ideas are a bit weird but the guy is a genius and I feel stronger and fitter. I now don't even use a hydrator in races up to two hours.

Read the book.

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