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Front brake in turns

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I have always heard that you need to "feather" the front brake while turning. I understand the idea behind it, forcing the front end to bite a little. However can anyone tell me to what extent do you need to "feather" the brake, or is this all just BS?

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I use it on rutted turns especially. It helps me put the front end where I want in the turn and gives the bike a solid line through a turn. As for how much you'll need, that is something you will have to find out for yourself.

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I almost always use the front brake unless it is slick in the turn. it keeps the front tire where i want it. ( well usually)

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It holds my front tire in the berm and keeps it form going over the top of a berm. I get on both brakes coming into the turn - once have slowed to the speed i need I stay on the front brake until I roll the throttle back on. In fact I am usually still draging the front brake while I first begin to roll the throttle on, once I am ready to get on it hard I release the front brake. It really is amazing how well it works.

I worked on it a lot, it became a habit, then I was in a sand wash and came in to a berm hard and went for the front brake.... oops, not really a sand technique!

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Yea it will definitely bite you in the sand, you can not stay planted in the sand because it just moves around too much.

When you apply the front brake, it put alot more weight on the front end, you are pushing down much harder into the ground so your tire won't pop out of a rut because of all of the force going down. It's a technique that has to be mastered. The faster you go, the more brake you use.

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You just use a light drag, like you do with the back brake over chatter bumps.

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Well, you will want to use the brakes in order to set a speed for entering the turn. But do not use the brakes just because some people advise it; Many times you will ride through a burm, with out using brakes at all.

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constant pressure. Imagine riding along in the pits in first gear. Your doing 5mph and you pull the clutch in apply the front brake so that you stop in 15feet. That sort of pressure. Sometimes a little more if your front wheel needs to be pushed into the rut a little harder or to turn a bit tighter.

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constant pressure. Imagine riding along in the pits in first gear. Your doing 5mph and you pull the clutch in apply the front brake so that you stop in 15feet. That sort of pressure. Sometimes a little more if your front wheel needs to be pushed into the rut a little harder or to turn a bit tighter.

Great example, I'll have to try it. Thanks for all the advise guys. I have a problem with my front end washing sometimes and I hope this will fix it.

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When i come into a turn i have alot more back brakes then my front brakes i pull the front brakes just enough to get the front end to stick. Then when im leaving the berm im usually dragging the back brake still sometimes.

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Well, you will want to use the brakes in order to set a speed for entering the turn. But do not use the brakes just because some people advise it; Many times you will ride through a burm, with out using brakes at all.

Word:thumbsup: . But if you are riding thru a berm without using brakes at all, you could shave some time by coming in hotter- and then braking. This even goes for sand, although you would obviously be lighter on the brakes to keep from kniving in and losing momentum.

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