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I am currently at the Air Force Academy and am about to head out to the "real" AF and i was wondering if anyone had any two cents about being in the military and being able to go riding. specifically if anyone went through pilot training and knows if there is time or a place to ride and keep your bike?

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my nephew was stationed at Ft Sill OK. and we went riding outside of town. Nobody said anything to him but this has been 20 yrs ago, things may have changed.

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The military allows you to ride as much as you want on your off time. You will have to go through saftey training coarses that are like 4 or 5 hours long. I heard that Holloman AFB actually has a track on base for personel to ride after they go through the training.

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if you are in flight training, STAY AWAY FROM A DIRTBIKE!! if you get dropped its not worth it. stay heathy and fly, dirt bikes will be here when you are done.

MN2(SW)

USN

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i spent 30 years in. can't remember any rules about not riding. just have to follow the rules when you ride. all of them... there might be times in training and duty that you are not allowed to participate in high risk sports, like racing, bull running, or cliff diving... the mission comes first. always. and you know that. can't speak for pilot training. can tell you about jump, freefall, dive, demolitions, atc, combat control, sere, survival, dive sup, terminal air control, naval gunfire, chapman's small arms, bill scott racing, and a couple others though.....

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Ya might want to put the riding on the shelf until you get your training behind you. You're going to need to stay on top of it and the risk, however minor, of injury while in the training environment isn't worth it. Save up for the bike you want and get it for yourself as a graduation present or something. I stepped away from the bikes for a few years, from about 6 months before flight school began until I was established in the Unit after I got back. I went the Army way so it was shorter than the Air Force route, but you can still do it. The length of time depends on what you end up flying of course. A buddy of mine left my Unit right after we got back from Iraq, he had been working towards the Air Force and is now in the middle of F-16 Qualification. We had this same conversation and he decided to wait.

Good luck.

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Get done with training first. As a fellow aviator I know a lot of pilots that ride. You can get in car accident and die or get seriously injured ending your flying career. But, you are not going to stop driving because of that chance.

They call it "liberty" for a reason. I say keep on roostin'!!!!

AMT3

USCG

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If you are in flight training Dirtbikes is a no go. While I was in flght training to be an aircrewman in the Navy, we were not allowed to ride motorcycles or anything until we got out of a FRS. Its not worth it to get hurt anyways until you get winged. You will have to get flight physicals and dont want to be NPQ'd before you can even fly.

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Most militaries are the same, aircrew are not allowed to do certain things, even taking cold medication without a flight surgeon`s approval!!! For good reason though, you will have time later. Good luck!!

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I would say to finish your training so you do not put a wrench in the plans. I retired out in the military in 93 and back in the late 70s I rode bulls on the side. I had to have a letter signed by the sq commander to ok my off duty activity back then so if I was to get hurt the military would fix me back up. You have to remember you are property of uncle sam and if you get hurt you have destroyed uncle sam property. Of course back then if the military wanted you to ride dirt bikes they would have issued you one. No drinking and riding because if ya get hurt the hosp bills could be all yours. Finish the training then have a blast. Like I said this was in the 70s alot has changed I'm sure.

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Have fun at UPT. Don't ride while you are there. It's not worth a med DQ or getting washed back. Do they still even do that? I know that they are trying to get wash outs to just get out these days, kind of like enjept(sp?). I am in ROTC right now, our commander doesn't want any of us riding at all. All it takes is one harsh injury and it's over.

Besides, what I understand about UPT is you shouldn't have time to ride anyway. You are supposed to be studying and getting ready for those stand ups.

Good luck! You trying for a fighter/bomber or heavies?

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I understand all the risks and what not, its just sooo frustrating that i havent riden in 4 years alraedy, its just killing me to stay off the bike, but thank you all for the advice, i really appreciate every bit of it

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i was thinking of going airforce after highschool because i want to fly fighter jets. i just wanted to know if its worth the 7 year comitment to the military. i know id be flying which would be awsome, but 7 years is a long time. what do you guys think?

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i was thinking of going airforce after highschool because i want to fly fighter jets. i just wanted to know if its worth the 7 year comitment to the military. i know id be flying which would be awsome, but 7 years is a long time. what do you guys think?

The catch word here is "commitment". If you do 100%, and really want it, than you can do 7 years standing on your head. It is a very powerfull word not to taken lightly. Go for it..... and you will grow from it..

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i was thinking of going airforce after highschool because i want to fly fighter jets. i just wanted to know if its worth the 7 year comitment to the military. i know id be flying which would be awsome, but 7 years is a long time. what do you guys think?

First, you will need to do one of three things:

-Go to Air Force Academy (best shot at pilot slot, roughly 50%)

-Go to college, enroll in an ROTC program (2nd best roughly 35% of slots)

-Go to college, go to OTS afterward. (depending on year 5-10% of slots)

Second, your commitment doesn't start until AFTER you complete pilot training. You are basically looking at 10 years. 1-casual status before going to UPT. 2 years at UPT. 7 (thought it was 8 or 10) as a pilot.

Just to let you know ahead of time, there are a lot of people who want to fly. Most want fighters. In your UPT (undergrad pilot training) class, there will only be a few, if any. In any given class, say there are 30 people. Maybe there are 3-5 fighter/bomber slots. This means you have to do better than 25-27 other people in that class to get a fighter/bomber. Now this is all trusting you even get the pilot slot in the first place, which is still difficult. You have to be better than most the other people in your class, nationwide.

Not to put a damper on it, but if you are not in it 100%, you wont get a slot. Be prepared to NOT get the slot and find a different job you want. If nothing else appeals to you at all, then maybe you shouldn't go. Just trying to instill that it is not a light commitment and you don't even find out your job until after you are committed for at least 4 years.

Supposedly the Navy and Marines "guarantee" a slot before you go to training, but take that with a grain of salt.

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I dont consider the comitment much of a comitment, especially if im flying like i would love to do for a job, but i just consider it my job and thats my life, would you consider a job at any other office a comitment, its more of a privilage to be doing a job you love.I would say go for it.

and a minor note about the AF academy pilot slots, its about 50% for the entire class but only about 55% of the class actually want a pilot slot, so its about a 95% chance of getting pilot if you are qualified and really want it.

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Yep, in the Corps riding is banned for air guys, not for ground guys though :applause:

My advice about doing Air Force ROTC is go to a school with a good det. I spent two years in a big one that gave pilot slots to people that didnt deserve them (usually ones with parents above O-5 or who were brown-nosers). Going to a small detachment will up your chances a little too.

Luckily, I realized that early enough and went to Marine OCS Good luck in whatever you choose :applause:

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Yep, in the Corps riding is banned for air guys, not for ground guys though :applause:

My advice about doing Air Force ROTC is go to a school with a good det. I spent two years in a big one that gave pilot slots to people that didnt deserve them (usually ones with parents above O-5 or who were brown-nosers). Going to a small detachment will up your chances a little too.

Luckily, I realized that early enough and went to Marine OCS Good luck in whatever you choose :applause:

Whats your MOS in the Corps?

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I am an active flyer in the USAF (AFSOC) and I ride all the time. Stay off that thing until you are at least BMQ, then ask around your unit. (Or, as I always say, it is better to beg for forgiveness than ask for permission) If you ride on the street, yes, you do need the MSF riders course. If off road only, don't sweat it. TRY not to get hurt too soon, your peers will frown on that. I ride with Stan/Eval, Ops Group, Command Chiefs, etc. You're good, just WAIT till you get your checkride at your new unit. Just my $.02. Fly Lucky. JL

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