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Any ideas or input would be appreciated

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OK, I posted this in the General forum, but that place seems to be a cesspool and I got very little in response. Maybe some of you locals can give me some insight.

Well I think it is time to build a shop. I am getting pretty sure of what I want and think I can accomodate my needs with a 30x40x14. I have 43 feet between my house and the property line, so I can fit it in right? Here is what I am thinking so far:

30x40x14

12'x12' door for RV and 12'x8' door for car/truck (insulated)

3' man door

2 4'Wx2'H windows installed at 10' to reduce visibility but still allow light

2' eaves all around

2 1/2" blanket insulation in walls and ceiling

poured floor

I have received one estimate so far at $22540 or $18860 without the floor (both prices include 7.6% tax).

I plan to stub in water and sewer now, but install later when money allows. I am comfortable wiring and have an electrician buddy that can help when needed. I also plan on installing a loft later and setting up my workshop underneath. I hope to have room to park the 18' TT, wife's car, bikes, and my truck in the shop.

Who has had a shop built? What size? Is it enough? What did you pay (if you had it built)? Is the blanket insulation worthwhile? Any suggestions would be considered and greatly appreciated.

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Have you looked at the Little Nickel yet? They're usually filled with pole barn and wood structure ads.

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Yes, I have 10 companies with phone numbers sketched out in a spreadsheet. I plan to get estimates throughout the next couple of weeks, but I am wondering if I am missing anything.

Insulation is a big question I have, go blanket, stud and fiberglass, or are there other alternatives.

A friend has a gas furnace he will sell me for $50 that he wants out of his garage, supposedly a good unit according to another friend who works in the business. I will worry about hooking up heat later, but plan on propane right now. Some are suggesting tubing in the floor, but I don't know if I need it.

I just want to get ideas and get lined out before going after all the estimates.

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i hear washington building permits are pretty pricey also. have you looked into a prebuilt steel building? you get a kit and put some cement forms in the ground and put it up yourself! i had a guy down the street put one up looks to be the same dimentions as what you are talking about doing by himself in 2 weeks, and it looks good! he didnt pour the cement pad till the building was up tho.. i guess because of the wonderful rain we get up here! :applause:

heating that space would be pretty costly! and as soon as you open that big door you will loose 50% of your heat. i would only run heating ducts around the area you will be working in, cars and trailers dont need heated parking!

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Ryan, for the insulation, go with a pro installation. See if Gale Contractor Services is in your area. They've done a few houses for me for less than it would have cost me for the materials alone (if I'd purchased from a home improvement store)

I hate messing with insulation. I've done quite a bit over the years and dislike even the smell.

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Ryan, for the insulation, go with a pro installation. See if Gale Contractor Services is in your area. They've done a few houses for me for less than it would have cost me for the materials alone (if I'd purchased from a home improvement store)

I hate messing with insulation. I've done quite a bit over the years and dislike even the smell.

Yea, use an R21 home insulation, you will be happy and really its not that expensive. Also you may wanna go with a roll up door for the rv space, and may wanna make that a 14-16 foot height. Also, you can get a wood stove on Craigs list for free or very cheap, a wood stove is a great idea for a shop. Good luck.

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I am in the architecture business and have dealt with all building types, they all seem to have their advantages but as mentioned the pre-engineered metal buildings are a pretty slick setup for what you are talking about. With the vinyl faced insulation that reflects light well and has a reasonably good R-value as well. Bang for the buck it might be worth looking into.

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Hey Ryan,

I had a 36' X 30' shop built last summer. Here are the specs I had made.

4" concrete floor with #4 rebar at 2'-0" on center. Normal is #3 at 48" O.C.

(won't crack as easy)

16' wide X 8' roll up door.

4' wide man door.

6:12 pitch roof with second floor. (I built the stairs)

24" eaves all around.

I used Bunker Building in Spokane. Real honest guy and he will do it fast and anyway you want it. They are on Rosewood by McDonalds at Francis and Monroe. Talk to Randy Bunker (owner) and tell him I referred you and he will give you a price cut because you were referred. (cuts out sales commission)

Anyway, we can talk at breakfast on Saturday.

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Size does matter. But that all depends on what your going to put in it. You might consider an ag type pole barn for the tax write off. If you can qualify. My friend in Ritchfield built a 60x120 pole barn and had some minature horses around for 5 years. Now it's filled with classic cars. Bummer. His barn has 2' eves, t-111 siding, windows, dormer.Remember that's it's hard to make it too big, but real easy to make it too SMALL. We get this usless info cheap and pass the savings on to you.

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is a 12' tall door enough? i have known poeple that wish they would have gone taller.

I agree! most rvs at at or above 12 ft tall and you need to think future ( the rv of your future, or a future homebuyer that may want your place). my rexair class A is 12' 6" , a 12 ft door leaves zero room for error in squeezing in most rvs...

Joe

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Hey Ryan,

I had a 36' X 30' shop built last summer. Here are the specs I had made.

4" concrete floor with #4 rebar at 2'-0" on center. Normal is #3 at 48" O.C.

(won't crack as easy)

16' wide X 8' roll up door.

4' wide man door.

6:12 pitch roof with second floor. (I built the stairs)

24" eaves all around.

I used Bunker Building in Spokane. Real honest guy and he will do it fast and anyway you want it. They are on Rosewood by McDonalds at Francis and Monroe. Talk to Randy Bunker (owner) and tell him I referred you and he will give you a price cut because you were referred. (cuts out sales commission)

Anyway, we can talk at breakfast on Saturday.

Maybe I can sneak up and look at it on the way home from Juniper Saturday?

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Maybe I can sneak up and look at it on the way home from Juniper Saturday?

Sounds good, you can see what I did. See you at breakfast.

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You might think about making the roof line longer to give you some covered parking, I use it for tractor parking. 2nd the bigger doors. If you wall in a shop inside then you can easily heat that area while working on bikes and stuff. It also gives you a loft over that area.

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Dont forget the Keg-erater for your friends that might come and visit from far away places.

TONY

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Another thought to consider is having sprayed in foam insulation done, it is more expensive, but the R-value recieved from it is amazing.

As for in-floor heat, if you are going to heat the shop all the time, it is well worth it in efficiency, if you plan to heat it only when you plan to work out there, it sucks, takes forever to warm up, since first you heat the concrete, then the concrete heats the shop. It is awesome for keeping dry floors and when you need to roll around on a creeper. though.

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As somebody who does land planning and home design my first question is are you allowed to put a structure right on your property line? do you have any setbacks on your property to deal with? You may want to look into these issues by making a trip to the local building department before you get started to see if you need or can get permits for it.

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