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What makes the 250 two-stroke harder to ride?

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Why do u think a bike like a yz250 would be harder to ride than a thumper and if it would be good to start on for some1 who wants a bike? its not me i just want to kno what u think

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I think the YZ250 is a great bike. They have been for years and although I think it might be a bit too much bike for a first-time rider, if the rider used a bit of common sense and a whole lot of respect, it could be a good choice. But they are a rocket and need to be treated as such.

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The power of a 250 is very abrupt.. well in comparison to a 450. I think the thumper would be easier to learn on because of the widespread power.

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um get a 125 or a 250f. you will be faster/better sooner on a bike that is slower. it may not make sense, but it works, trust me.

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if you are a wimp a 250 is too much. i started on riding dirt on a yz250 and street on a GSXR750. it all revolves around respect and fear. fight or flight, and dont be a moron/statistic.

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i dont think anyone is a wimp for starting on less then a 250, just that he is 16 makes me think the smaller one would be better.

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two strokes hit hard in higher rpms. When i rode my friends 125 i thot it was way mellow, then higher rpms it kinda scared the shit out of me

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I thought a 250 wasnt gonna have shite on my 450 when I bought it..man o man was I wrong! because it hits so hard you need to hold on ..for your life ..I was almost regreting it after goin out twice ..then I took it to a sand track ...calmed it down a lil ...then hit the weights!

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a 250 2 stroke...or pretty much 2 strokes in gerneral...have a very snappy powerband...it is very quick with the throttle...it feels as if the throttle is very sensitive....with that kind of powerband...expect to be pulled around....

with a 4 stroke...it has a smoother and more usuable powerband through all obstacles....seriously though i feel like ever since iv been riding a 4 stroke it has felt like i have gotten lazy...dnt use the clutch to upshift...can sat in 1 or 2 gears throught the whole track....unlike a 250 or 125 2 stroke....where u shift basically all the time....great way to sharpen ur skills...

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A comparison of two hondas from my real world experience

2001 CR 250R: Very sharp power delivery. Once it hits the pipe it straightens your arms out and spins the rear tire violently. You can almost lug it, but the motor really wants to be abused. Its hard to go fast on this bike because the clutch comes into play if you let the RPMs drop down too far. Since the bike is feather light, its really twitchy at high speeds. It will wheelie in every gear, but you pretty much have to be in the correct gear (in other words it won't bring the front end up riding a gear high)

2005 CRF 450R. The motor is the ultimate jeckal/hyde mill. It can be smooth and mellow or flat out rip depending on how you treat (mistreat) the throttle. It pulls smoothly from just above idle to the rev limiter with no surprises. This bike wheelies in every gear also, but it will also bring the front up riding a gear high with minimal effort. Hookup is a ton better than the 2 stroke CR and the extra weight makes it significantly more stable than the CR with no real penalty in flickability.

For me, I'll take the tractability/useability of a thumper over the "personality" of a two stroke anytime...but then again I'm lazy :applause:

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what do you guys mean when you say hits hard at high rpm's. like once you his a certain rpm range it feels like a rocket boost or what? or it accelerates faster?

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Yes, that's a pretty good description. A 4-stroke has smooth linear power. On the 2-stroke, once you hit a certain RPM, the motor takes off! Although the 2-stroke more power for the same size engine, this makes it harder to control and ride.

what do you guys mean when you say hits hard at high rpm's. like once you his a certain rpm range it feels like a rocket boost or what? or it accelerates faster?

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Don't forget that the situation comes into play when you discuss "harder to ride". 450s are very difficult and heavy on woods trails and when conditions are less than optimal (heavy sand, mud, ruts, etc.). That's why 2 strokes are so popular with the offroad crowd. For an extreme example of "less than optimal conditions", watch Last Man Standing on Speed. It's pretty amazing what they can do in those condtions, and probably 98% of the riders were on 2 strokes. If your talking about riding around a groomed and watered MX track on a sunny day, then 4 strokes are easier to ride. 450 riders rarely need to shift or fan the clutch.

But if this post is about what to get for the beginner, you shouldn't even be considering 250s (2 or 4 stroke) or 450s. Learning to ride on bikes with that kind of power is difficult and dangerous. It's like learning to drive in a race car, or learning to ski on the steepest downhill. Buy a 125 smoker! They are fast but not lethal, maintenance is easy and parts are silly cheap, and they are more fun than just about anything out there. Plus, if you learn to ride a 125 fast (with all the shifting and clutching, and maintaining momentum), you will be fast on any bike!

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I am sure this has been said but it is not that 2t are harder it is the thing of the rider having to be more attentive when riding a 2t. They are more fun though.:applause:

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The design of the two stroke engine combined with the exhaust pipe basically acts as a turbo on a car. At a certain RPM range, due to the design of the exhaust pipe, you are getting pressure forced back into the cylinder, which then gives you that boost.

It's much like the turbo in a car, just without the actual turbo having to be installed. It's fun. :applause:

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the yz450f weighs what?... 9 lbs more than the yz250???

there is a reason why even the pros' have switched over to the 4 stroke.

and on top of that,maintenace is a bit%@ on a two stroke.... can you spell"top end"???

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Four-strokes cost more than two-strokes do to keep running. Can you spell "valves". I don't think 250 2-strokes are hard to ride. I thinks my kx250 is easier to ride than my kx100. You just have to hold on a little bit tighter.:applause:

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there is a reason why even the pros' have switched over to the 4 stroke.

I'ts called creative advertising, promotions, and what the factories says goes and who foots the bills..:applause:

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Jets, your description is pretty much right. The 2stroke will hit it's 'powerband' (the rpm range where the engine makes the vast majority of it's power) like an F-15 kicking in the afterburners. On a much smaller scale, of course. Initially, the powerband can be intimidating for those who aren't familiar with it, but once a rider has become familiar with it, he can use it to his advantage. I've had my CR250 for over nine years and I know it so well that I could almost ride it in my sleep. In the tight steep sections of the woods we ride in the north Georgia mountains, I can keep the rpm in the 'sweet spot', which is just before hitting the powerband full-on. This gives the bike the ability to be on the power, but not so much as making it like trying to stay on that bull for the full eight seconds. This way, I have the bike's muscle working for me without having to put everything I have into staying on the trail, or staying on the bike for that matter. Using the power in this manner means that the bike will chug right up and over everything that's been thrown at it. And the real beauty of it is that at any given instant, I am just a split-second away from the full effect of the afterburners. This takes some learning to get to know exactly where this sweet spot is, and properly controlling the throttle...but it's not rocket science, all it takes is seat time.

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