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disk (front) removal - allen screws stuck

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Besides saturating with WD40 and tapping the metric allen T-handle with a hammer while trying to back out, what else can I do to get the damn screw out? I have a new front disk and four allen screws from MotoXotica ready. I have pretty much stripped one out - while tapping with a hammer. :applause: Help!

Thanks,

Chris

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Besides saturating with WD40 and tapping the metric allen T-handle with a hammer while trying to back out, what else can I do to get the damn screw out? I have a new front disk and four allen screws from MotoXotica ready. I have pretty much stripped one out - while tapping with a hammer. :applause: Help!

Thanks,

Chris

A hand held impact tool work well for this kind of thing. I'm talking about the kind that looks like a big screw driver and you hit the tail end with a hammer. Drives it in while trying to spin it. You want to snap it hard and quick. Usually doing it slow and careful will strip it. You want to shock it out. You might want to heat it up a little as well as they probably has locktitie on them. For the stripped one I have had luck with pounding in a torx bit. If this or an EZ out type thing does not work your going to have to drill it out and hope there is enough left sticking out to remove with a visegrip.

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use some heat, with care but get em hot with a hot plate or a torch,,just exercise care. Good luck,,,if no luck you will need to drill the heads off, remove the disc and use heat and vise grips to remove the shanks. When you reinstall use a good quality anti seize on the screw threads. Remember this is cad plate steel screws into Al or mag (I think OEM uses Mag) and galvanic corrosion occurs. Again best of luck, Rob-Accio

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:lol::applause: :applause:

We'll that didn't take long - to ruin a perfectly good hub. Grrrr. On the positive side, this is a great opportunity to learn from my expensive mistake. I tried to heat and "snap" the remaining two good screws, with less than positive results. So I drilled out the screw heads - incorrectly (not leaving enough to grip...). So, I had to drill out the threads. Surprisingly, only one of the threads didn't come out with the bit. Long story short, in my last pass I took about 1/4 of the threads out as well. So, should I buy a tap kit and go through that exercise, or just get another hub and have this straightened wheel relaced? Honestly, I am tempted just to order a new complete wheel. The more time I spend working on this the more money my wife thinks I am spending. Argh!!!

Chris

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I would use a Timesert instead of a heli-coil, they seem to be more reliable/easier/stronger. It WILL hold. Even if you buy a new one I'd fix it to have the spare wheel...:applause:

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Does Time-Sert make an insert without a flange?

If not twoburgers might think he has a warped rotor :lol: to compliment his stripped wheel. :applause:

TwoBurgers '07 TE 510

What I lack in skill I make up with reckless abandon and even mo money. :applause:

image003.gif

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A hand held impact tool work well for this kind of thing. I'm talking about the kind that looks like a big screw driver and you hit the tail end with a hammer. Drives it in while trying to spin it. You want to snap it hard and quick. Usually doing it slow and careful will strip it. You want to shock it out. You might want to heat it up a little as well as they probably has locktitie on them. For the stripped one I have had luck with pounding in a torx bit. If this or an EZ out type thing does not work your going to have to drill it out and hope there is enough left sticking out to remove with a visegrip.

Good idea :applause: Never thought of it....

The hand held hit with the hammer impact driver - can one of those battery operated electric impact wrenches but used just as well? Would it work better? Worse? :applause:

I really don't know the answer but have had one on my shopping list for a while now - and most seem to accept the same type of hex bit as the "hit it with a hammer" impact driver.

Is there any place you would not want to use a battery operated impact drivers - when you can't get the screw / bolt off very easy.

.

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Bosch makes an impactor drill 14v. Model # 23614. www.boschtools.com. It only hammers when resistance is applied. I have one and it works great for awkward nuts such as the clutch.

Don't use crappy Chinese sockets or 3/8" adaptors as it will destroy them. Get quality stuff.

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I use a Makita cordless impact with 3/8 drive (6933 FDWE). Works great on stubborn fasteners and axle nuts. You must use good sockets/bits to avoid damaging the hardware. It has 103 ft lbs of tightening torque.

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You guys need to take a structures class. First step good tools, next penetrating oil, next heat (carefully but hot) for countersunk fasteners next pilot drill the center of the fastener with the proper corresponding bit for a good sized ez-out(deep into the screw). heat again and tap (with ball-peen or other) the ez-out while turning it out. No joy? drill with a bit that is over the screw shank size, pop off the head. Remove the part being held on (disc or sprocket etc)drill deeper with pilot if possible and heat and again grab the ez-out and tap on it with a hammer while turning it. No Joy? Try to just lock onto the shank with vise grips (hard on countersunk screws that end up short into the base structure). Try to slot the remaing shank and use a large straight slot screw driver with a wrench atached or a speed handle to turn it out. No joy? Drill the whole mess out with the correct tap size bit for Time serts (great product) or heli coils and install these.

Note the slot trick is great but for these fasteners which are countersunk it is difficult, it works great for bolts and screws that are not countersunk and is a good method of removal for stripped heads, using a dremel tool or other the cut a slot in the head and using a stright slot screwdriver with the wrench attached (most good quality straight slots (ie snap on) have a wrench hex built into the screw driver shaft. best of luck and don't worry about the hub , now a good shop can fix the issue with no problem with threaded inserts

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On my last ride, I had a CR 250 fall on me (the front wheel). So it was tweaked a bit. I had gotten it fairly straight with a rubber mallet, but wanted to put on a new one now that the wheel was nice and straight (Woody's Wheel Works). It was a honest drop, as it was a highly technical rocky downhill section. Stuff happens.

Chris

TB,

Why were you replacing the disc? Your bike can't have that many miles on it.

Norman

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On my last ride, I had a CR 250 fall on me (the front wheel). So it was tweaked a bit. I had gotten it fairly straight with a rubber mallet, but wanted to put on a new one now that the wheel was nice and straight (Woody's Wheel Works). It was a honest drop, as it was a highly technical rocky downhill section. Stuff happens.

Chris

Stuff does happen.... I hope you get it sorted, good machine shop should be able to help.

Norman

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Well, I decided to send the wheel back to Woody's in CO to have them address the disk thread issue I created. Once they look at it, they will provide me with options - probably an overbore re-thread. If for some reason it can't be fixed, I'll have them swap out the stock w/ a Talon. I appreciate the advice and technique - hopefully will save someone from the headache and cost I have experienced. I guess the golden rule - stay away from Honda's...:applause:

Chris

and to Louge - much less mo money...

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Time serts and even heli coils are great tools when you have lots of meat around the hole, that is usually not the case on a "weight sensitive" item like this.

Before damage was done I think its 400 degrees? that kill loctite. As I have always used red loctite I occasionally have to do that. At this point you likly looking at a hub but some real good chrafstman may fix the hole

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Update and question...

Woody's recommended a helicoil for two of the four threads. They did a nice job with this. But, the rim still has a slight wobble (not side-to-side). Grrrr. I think the next time I have a few bucks I'll order a new front wheel. Either way, I'm ready for a ADV ride 4/28&29 in MD. My question - the pads are dragging the disk (not binding though) after I re-installed the front wheel. Will this go away after I brake a few times, or did I do something incorrectly when spreading the pads (fell together - brake not applied)?:bonk:

Thanks,

Chris

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Update and question...

Woody's recommended a helicoil for two of the four threads. They did a nice job with this. But, the rim still has a slight wobble (not side-to-side). Grrrr. I think the next time I have a few bucks I'll order a new front wheel. Either way, I'm ready for a ADV ride 4/28&29 in MD. My question - the pads are dragging the disk (not binding though) after I re-installed the front wheel. Will this go away after I brake a few times, or did I do something incorrectly when spreading the pads (fell together - brake not applied)?:bonk:

Thanks,

Chris

Your front wheel is probably not centered. Try this, make sure the axle nut is tight and loosen up the axle clamp bolts. Spin the wheel quickly with your hand and grab the front brake. Do this about 4/5 times and it should fix the problem. Put Never-Sieze on all the bolts to prevent your problem in the future. I sell and service industrial control valves that are in really nasty environments and Never-Sieze is a must for preventing corrosion of fasteners. If it works on carbon steel in a chemical plant it will work on a dirt bike, just remember a little goes a long way!

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