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Rebuilding Rear Shock

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Hey guys, this is for a Yamaha 2006 YZ250F... whats the procedure on putting the oil back in the shock? I tried, put it in, and got rid of the air... tried compressing it and it wouldn't work right... I can't understand the KYB stuff... someone help me...? :applause:

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Do you have a service manual?

If not, look at the "read before you post" to download a service manual. There is a link at the top of the page...

Should be pretty straight forward.

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Do you have a service manual?

If not, look at the "read before you post" to download a service manual. There is a link at the top of the page...

Should be pretty straight forward.

So exactly which page of the service manual should he go to?

Did you even look at the manual?

Before spouting off "Read the manual", maybe try it first yourself. What he's looking for isn't in the Yamaha owners service manual.

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Hey guys, this is for a Yamaha 2006 YZ250F... whats the procedure on putting the oil back in the shock? I tried, put it in, and got rid of the air... tried compressing it and it wouldn't work right... I can't understand the KYB stuff... someone help me...? :applause:

I do this all the time. I have to leave right now, but I'll be back in a couple of hours & I'll write it up for you.

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So exactly which page of the service manual should he go to?

Did you even look at the manual?

Before spouting off "Read the manual", maybe try it first yourself. What he's looking for isn't in the Yamaha owners service manual.

pot calling the kettle black no?

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The best way is to take the shaft and end cap and install it into the shock. Then hold the shock in the vise where the low speed compression adjuster would screw into the shock facing up. Make sure you put just a few psi into the bladder with air if you want. Then fill the shock with oil allowing some to flow into the nitrogen bladder area. Now stroke the shock shaft to allow the air to bleed out. I would only move the shaft about 2-3 inches pushing it in all the way will make the oil flow out. Once all the air is out of the oil and your level is just going into the bladder screw in your compression adjuster, let out the air from the bladder and full the shock with nitrogen. I'm sure your shock had air in it. You really have to be careful when bleeding them it helps to turn the shaft when slowly moving the shaft back and forth to get the air past the piston.

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Put the shock body in a vise. Turn your compression screw counterclockwise all the way out. This will let the oil transfer easier from each side and it will help get air out of the valve body. Fill the resivore up half way with your oil then fill the shock body to 1/2 inch below the lowest circlip position. Tap your shock body around a little bit to raise any air boubles. Install the shock shaft. Push the piston into the oil just far enough for you to be able to install the circlip. Some oil should overflow the piston, This helps ensure that all the air is kept out. Slowly pump the pistin in about a half inch. This forces oil through your compression valve, thus getting the air out of the valve. Then slowly pull back the piston until the seal head stops against the circlip.

Now you are ready to install the bladder. Test the oil level by inserting the bladder until oil seaps out around the seal right before you push the bladder in

past the circlip groove. Once you have installed the circlip pull the bladder back against the circlip using some soft grip pliers. Now find someone that trust your rebuild and have them charge the shock with nitrogen. I believe that the range is around 150-170 pounds.

Hope this helps

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pot calling the kettle black no?

Well I don't think so. He told the guy to read the manual. The procedure the original poster was asking for isn't in the manual (because I actually looked in the book before I replied). So I don't see this as pot calling the kettle black at all.

I have no problem with someone saying read the manual if the info is actually IN the manual. I used to work in customer serivce for Hewlett-Packard as a 4th level engineer. I said RTFM plenty of times, but made sure it was in the manual first.

I'm helping my daughter move this evening/tomorrow, so everyone was waiting on me when I left. I was going to type in the process, but someone else beat me to it.

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Well I don't think so. He told the guy to read the manual. The procedure the original poster was asking for isn't in the manual (because I actually looked in the book before I replied). So I don't see this as pot calling the kettle black at all.

I have no problem with someone saying read the manual if the info is actually IN the manual. I used to work in customer serivce for Hewlett-Packard as a 4th level engineer. I said RTFM plenty of times, but made sure it was in the manual first.

I'm helping my daughter move this evening/tomorrow, so everyone was waiting on me when I left. I was going to type in the process, but someone else beat me to it.

Again, I saw oil in the post, and thought the front forks.

If you look in the manual, the forks are in there. The rear shock is pretty much the only thing the manual doesn't cover because it contains pressure...

I wouldn't have said read the manual if I knew the post was about the rear shock. Just one went over my head...

Sorry guys.

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Thanks... I think. I do shocks all the time... just haven't came accross a KYB Shock. They ARE different, and Yes, as you have figured out it IS NOT in the manual. Thats why I came here. I will try that tomorrow. Thanks again.

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It is really easy once you do it the the first time just remember A 45 degree angle slant helps get most of the air out. I do my own all the time. The only problem is finding someone to chage it for you. May get the gauges you do it soon. good chunk of money 135 I think if I am right.

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