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can you clean chain with mineral turpentine?

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Hello all

I do lots of air filter and chain cleaning on 2 dirt bikes. I use mineral turpentine to clean the air filters as suggested in the workshop manual. I would like to recycle the used turps and use it to clean the chains as well. Does anyone know if this would be OK?

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If it is not an O-ring chain, then no big deal! But.........absolutely NO, if it is an O-ring chain! O-ring chains are permanently lubed at the factory. Each link is injected with grease, and the O-ring is just there to hold the grease in place.

When you use a solvent on the chain (especially a very thin one like turpentine), it has a good possibility of getting past the O-ring. What will that do??? The solvent will dissolve the grease and you are left with no lube at all, and your chain life will be greatly reduced!

Don't use thin chain lubes on an O-ring chain for the same reason, and never use anything like WD-40. Best to use chain wax, which won't attract dirt.

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Thanks reconranger. I understand the o ring bit, that's why I asked the question. Apparently it is OK to use kerosene to clean o ring chains. And apparently it is OK to clean air filters with mineral turps. I thought maybe it is OK to use turps on air filters because it doesn't damage the foam. So maybe it is OK for o rings too.

Turps does seem thinner than kero. I shall err on the side of caution then.

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Take a close look at your O-rings, and you will probably find a few that have cracks! It is OK to WIPE the chain with a rag that is wet with a solvent, but don't SOAK th echain in it, because that will give the solvent an opportunity to get by the rings.

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If it is not an O-ring chain, then no big deal! But.........absolutely NO, if it is an O-ring chain! O-ring chains are permanently lubed at the factory. Each link is injected with grease, and the O-ring is just there to hold the grease in place.

.

good point and due to this there's really no reason to do much of anything to a chain unless you are just obsessed with making it look pretty.

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i dump a little gaoline into a 5 gallon bucket clean my chain and foam filter then filter out the dirt and dump it into my weed wacker or mower. its a triple threat.:applause: . If your anel(employee of the month,lol) about your chains and such. The local shop said to use wd-40 or equivelent to clean chains without hurting the o rings. chains and filters are too inexpensive to worry about breaking or coming apart

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Well, I did an experiment. I soaked an o ring in some turps for a couple of hours, then let it sit on the bench wet. It dried overnight. That was 3 days ago. The o ring seems OK. While it was wet I rubbed it to see if anything came off (like liquified rubber) but it didn't. I cleaned the chain tonight with turps, and it dried much quicker than kero (15mins). And I think it did a better job of cleaning. So I might keep using it after it has been used on the air filters.

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Somebody already gave the correct answer in that you really need to do NOTHING to an o-ring chain ever except ride it and make sure the tension is correct. What people are 'cleaning' is beyond me and the o-ring chain was made to eliminate all this chain maintenance. Since you DO NOT have to lube an 0-ring chain, I'd really like to know what people 'think' they are removing with all these solvents that water and soap won't remove or just riding it! The cleaning and lubing is CAUSING the dirt to be a problem if in fact it is and it's not just an imagined anal waste of time, but if that's how you like to waste your time, enjoy it!

And I thoroughly recommending cleaning it with thinnest possible rubber dissolving solvent you can get because no matter what people are told NOT to use, you people will turn right around and say, 'it works for me'. Therefore, use whatever you want as it doesn't matter! Cleaning and lubing a chain which doesn't need it with solvents that dissolve rubber is perfect! Go for it.

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I also don't understand why you guys even bother to clean x or o ring chains.

I average around 3,000 miles of racing and riding each year. After I wash the bike I spray the chain with some WD40 to keep it from rusting. Before I ride it again I'll spray the chain with chain lube. Usually one of the newer synthetic types and that's it.

The chain will last a full year and sometimes more. Plus I'm not dinking around "cleaning" a chain. :applause:

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what do chain manufactures say for maintenance on their websites???

I'm going to look.....

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From the Regina Chain website

In the O-Ring chains, lubrication is provided by grease sealed in the working area by O-Rings.However, it is still necessary to provide periodic lubrication to the chain. Lubricant between roller and bushings will decrease friction and heat, and will improve the efficiency of the drive, extending chain and sprockets life.

Lubrication also keeps O-Rings in good condition and protects the metallic components from rust and corrosion.

Also from Regina Chain

If the chain is not too dirty, the operation of lubrication is normally sufficient to clean the chain.

When the accumulation of dirt on the chain (sand, mud, asphalt particles or other foreign materials) is excessive, the chain must be washed with a brush and kerosene.

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. Lubricant between roller and bushings will decrease friction and heat, and will improve the efficiency of the drive, extending chain and sprockets life.

Lubrication also keeps O-Rings in good condition and protects the metallic components from rust and corrosion.[/color]

]

Industry studies I've seen show that there really is very little difference in efficiency and heat from a 'wet' chain to a dry. (Dry and DIRTY is totally different)

Protection from rust and corrosion? Hmmm, the thin metal of a car fender will generally last at least 5 years if you NEVER clean it, but somehow a chain which lasts about 1 year is gonna rust enough to affect performance or fall apart? Doubtful. Just ride the damn thing.

Nevertheless if you still feel so compelled to lube something, you need to use something that will NOT dissolve the o-ring which could simply be motor oil or " Use SAE 80-90 mineral oil or motorcycle chain specific lubricant safe for O-Rings." Beware, too, because SILICONE is in many of those chain lubes and silicone DOES dissolve rubber!

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Industry studies ......

I'm not arguing with you. I guess you just disagree with two different chain manufactures.:applause:

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Any solvent which doesn't dissolve rubber is fine.

Easy to say but "rubber" is a very generic term today. The question is, what are the O rings made out of (Buna N? or ????) and what is that material sensitive to?

I'd suggest checking with the chain manufacturer for recomendations because they may not all use the same materials.

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I'm not arguing with you. I guess you just disagree with two different chain manufactures.:applause:

let them post up the science which backs their recommendations and i"ll believe it.

There are all too many companies all to willing to tell people whatever they want to hear or whatever is cheapest.

Believe what you want, but that only makes it your opinion. I base my decisions on scientific fact and if I can't back it up, I shut up. Not every company is like that.

Nevertheless, please tell us how a little bit of lube on an o-ring chain will stop or slow stretching of the chain...............And I bet you $100 that the manufacturers don't even tell people about silicone eating rubber or just don't choose to ...........now why would they do that? Because they get more money if your chain wears out faster! I get nothing and frankly don't care if you believe facts or not. It's your choice.

It's well known in chemistry that silicone eats rubber, but armour all and others continue to convince people to put it everywhere including their tires and chain lubes contain it as well. Believe science or believe somebody who wants to make a buck.

I'm right and you're just spending more money!

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